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October 01, 1935 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

- JAGE SEE

State Loses Two
Backfield Stars
From Next Tilt
Warmbein And Edwards,
Unable To Participate
Because Of Injuries
EAST LANSING, Sept. 30. - (P) -
The Michigan State College football
team preparing for the "game of
games" with Michigan at Ann Arbor
Saturday learned today it will have
to enter the game without two of its
backfield stars.
On top of the injury to Dick Ed-
wards, right halfback, that will keep
him out of practice for at least two
weeks, the team learned that Kurt
Warmbein will not be in the starting
lineup to throw his accurate forward
passes and probably will not even be
able to play at all.
Edwards is onacrutches because of
ligaments that were torn in the bend
of his knee in the opening game with
Grinnell Saturday. Warmbein in-
jured his shoulder in practice early
this season, did not even put on a
uniform Saturday, and the doctors
told him today that if he plays at all
Saturday it can be "only just a few
minutes."
Michigan Gargoyle
Reduces Rates Of
Last YearBy Half
Opening its 1935-36 subscription
drive, the business staff of the Mich-
igan Gargoyle, nationally famous hu-
mor monthly, announced recently
that the annual rate for the publica-
tio of nine issues would be 50 cents.
This constitutes a reduction by half
of last year's price of $1. The sales
drive has been conducted under the
supervision of Norman Williamson,
'36, business manager.
The first edition of the 1935-36
series will comprise 40 pages, Don
Miller, '36 editor, stated yesterday.
By popular request 'the editors have
continued many outstanding de-
partments of last year's Gargoyle, in-
cluding Sophisticated Lady and Pre-
posterous People. "Candid Camera"
will again be featured. Miller an-
nounced that the "official black ball"
will not appear in the first issue but
may be used later at the discretion
of the editors.
Focussing its attention on the foot-
ball season, the October issue of the
Gargoyle will contain an unusual
pictorial representation of the '35
Wolverines, a covering presenting the
coaching staff, and an article by
Harry Kipke. The October issue will
make its appearance Wednesday,
Oct. 9.
Students with advanced credits de-
sirous of trying out for the Gargoyle
may do so at once, it was announced
yesterday. Walker Graham, '37, and
Ogden Dwight, '37, will be in charge
of the art and writing try-out sec-
tions, respectively.
Ask For Tryouts
for Union Council
A call for sophomore tryouts for
the executive council of the Union was
issued last night by Wencel A. Neu-
mann, '36, president of the Union.
All second year men interested are
urged to report at 5 p.m. today in
Room 304 of the Union.
Neumann stated that those soph-
omores who were on the Union staff
during the second semester of their
freshman year were expected to re-
port and emphasized the fact that all
sophomores who are scholastically

eligible and who are interested should
come to the meeting. It is not abso-
lutely essential that such men have
been tryouts for the council before,
he stated.
The tryouts are placed on one of
the various student committees which
help direct the student activities of
the Union. Every six weeks the try-
outs are moved from one committee
to another until each sophomore has
served on each of the different groups.
When the sophomores are picked the
chairmen of the committees who be-
come members of the executive coun-
cilmen.

Map Shows British Empire's Interests In A frica
GREAT BRITAIN
E U R 0 P E
n ..A S Z ra
GIBRALTARa-sCYPRUS (BR.)
MALTA) I S e a PALESTINE
TRANS-JOR N
L BYA (SR.) KOWEIT
EGYPT I N D I A
GAMBIA V DEN
EK PTT BR.SOMALILAND
GOp NIGERIA SUDAN f
SIER CAS ETHIOPIA
EONE ITALIAN SOMALILAND
UGAN A 'KENYA
TANGAN IKA I
TERR.A l? a n
At I .n t ic O c e an
A f ~ a i -l © C anRNODES A
Ocean cn
SOUTH- BECH- *MAURITIUS N
WEST, UANA- (9R.)
AFRICA LANDI
SOUFH BRITISH
AFRICA
-Associated Press Map
This map shows graphically the parts of the far-flung British empire affected by Italian movements in
Africa and reason for England's interest in Mussolini's plans in Ethiopia. Fearing Italy's efforts would
create trouble in her own African possessions, or disrupt the precious "lifelind" extending through the
Mediterranean 4and Suez canal to these possessions, India and the Orient, England has amassed a mighty
fleet in the Mediterranean. If the Suez canal were closed, Italy would be forced to reach Ethiopia by a
route thousands of miles around Africa.

Medical School
Convenes For
Annual Meet,
Dean Furstenberg Urges
Medics To Plan Field Of
Work Early
The Medical School held its eighty-
sixthnannualhconvocationMonday
morning at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre, officially opening the present
school year.
The exercises were opened with a
few introductory remarks and greet-
ings extended to returning students
and the incoming freshman class by
President Alexander G. Ruthven. He
was followed by the guest speaker of
the exercises, Dr. Andrew Porter Bid-
dle, a graduate of the Detroit Medical
School in 1886 and now practicing
dermatology in Detroit. Dr. Biddle is
active in state and national medical
societies, having been president of
several of the societies in the past.
In his address Dr. Biddle stressed
the problems relating to social medi-
cine, discussing them from the stand-
point of both the patient and the
physician. Following his address he
was presented with an honorary de-
gree of Master of Arts.
The Sternberg Medal, annually
awarded since 1921 to the student
who has done most in the field of
public health, was then given to Dr.
William George Gordon.
The presentation was followed by
remarks to the students on behalf of
the faculty by Dean A. C. Fursten-
berg. He pointed out the advantages
for the medical student in choosing
his field for practice early and the
advisabiilty of selecting a good hos-
pital as well as a capable superior for
his, interne training.
The exercises were closed by Pres.
Ruthven.
COUZENS HOME
BIRMINGHAM, Sept. 30.- (/P)-
Senator James Couzens was home
again today after three months in
the Mayo clinic at Rochester, Minn.,
where he underwent four operations.

Won't Salute Flag

nesses," went to jail on a charge of
disturbing school today after he had
sprawled his legs under a small third
grade desk and watched his eight-
year old son again refuse to salute
the stars and stripes.
Arrested with the elder Nichols was
a friend, named by police sergeants
Joseph Gannon as Edward H. James,
Concord. James and Nichols were
released on $200 bail after pleading
innocent to the disturbance charges.
They were booked for a hearing in
Lynn district court tomorrow.
Why waste those
Leisure Moments
between classes
when it's just a
step to the
B altim ore
Dairy Lunch
STATE OPP. ANGELL HALL

-Associated Press Photo.
Officials at Lynn, Mass., were in a
quandary after eight year old Carl-
ton B. Nichols (above) Lynn school-
boy, refused to salute the flag on
grounds that it was an "emblem
of the devil." His family belongs to
a sect known as "Jehovah's Wit-
nesses."
BOY'S FATHER HELD
LYNN, Mass., Sept. 30. -(/P) -
Carlton Nichols, Sr., a member of a
religious sect called "Jehovah's Wit-

"From a Sandwich to a
Full Dinner."

READ THE WANT ADS

Professor Swinton To Survey
Wear Tear Of Graveled Roads

the efficacy and economy of the stab-
ilized gravel road in relation to other
gravel road surfaces, as well as the
annual loss of gravel due to traffic on
loose gravel and calcium chloride-
treated gravel.

Every Study Room and
Office Needs these-
Sponge lubber Chair Pad. . . $1.00 up
Desk Pad with Blotter .......50c up
Waste Baskets . . . . . . . . . . 35c up
Canvas Bnder................50c
Book Ends.............25c pair
Zipper Brief Pocket .......$1.29 up
Sheaffer, WahI Pens and Pencils
The ayer-Sckairer Co.
,Sationers, Printers, Binders
0/ice Outfitters
Phone 4515 112 South Main St.

How fast does a gravel road go?
No, it's not a riddle, it's a scientific
study of road surfaces being under-
taken by Prof. Roy S. Swinton of the
University of Michigan Engineering
College, who is planning a study of
the wear and tear of Michigan's mo-
tor traffic on different types of gravel
roads, under a contract with the
Calcium Chloride Association.
Measurements of three-mile sec-
tions of roads in Wayne, Washtenaw,
Genesee, and Huron counties have al-
ready been taken during the spring
of 1935,,and will continue with spring
and fall' measurements until the end
of 1938, on three types of surfaces.
These roads are Geddes Road from
the Washtenaw-Wayne county line to
Ruthven Will Sign
1,000 Pledges; Pen
Firms Please Note
The job of being president of the
University of Michigan is no snap.
Even if it had been, it won't be very
long.
If you doubt it, you have only to
ask President Ruthven. Within a
very few days, President Ruthven
will have to sign personally nearly
1,000 documents - the oaths which
members of the faculty are required
to swear to by the Baldwin bill.
The bill, passed by the last Legisla-
ture, declared that ". . . it shall be
unlawful for any citizen of the United
States to serve as a teacher . . ." in
any college exempt from taxation un-,
less he swears to support the United
States Constitution.
About half of the approximately 1,-
000 teaching members of the faculty
have returned the oaths, which werel
handed out with contracts, signed.
The others are coming in every day,
according to the President's office.
But where the rub comes is that
President Ruthven will have to and is
planning to sign personally each oath.
And if he doesn't get the writer's
cramp, he says he is sure to wear
out several fountain pens.
All of which makes him sigh sadly:
"This job of being President is no
snap."~

'Michigan Avenue in Wayne, Seven
Mile Road from Pontiac Road west
in Washtenaw, Sebawing Road off
M-53 eight miles south of Bad Axe
in Huron County, and McKinley Road
out of Flushing in Genesee County.
All four roads carry traffic of from
300 to 500 cars daily, and are roads
on which the counties have agreed
not to change the type of surfacing
during the period of the survey. Any
necessary additions of gravel will be
carefully recorded as to amount and
location.
Each road will consist of successive
miles of three different surfaces. The
first will be a mile of "stabilized" sur-
facing, consisting of gravel bound
with clay and containing calcium
chloride throughout its crust in suf-
ficient quantities to prevent dust and
raveling. The second mile will be
gravel maintained with calcium
chloride in the usual dust-proofing'
manner, and the third mile will be
loose gravel which has not been treat-
ed in any way.
Professor Swinton will take his
readings with respect to a leveled line
across the crown of the road from one
side to the other, with measurements
from the line to the gravel surface at
intervals of a foot. The set of about
24 readings thus obtained will be
averaged with 19 other sets of meas-
urements taken in the same mile to
determine the average height of grav-
el for the section studied. Loss of
gravel will then be determined by
comparison of successive readings
with the original reading.
Other studies which will be under-
taken at the same time on the roads
include measurements to see if the
depth of the surface "mat" or "crust"
has changed, periodical traffic counts,
and records of maintenance costs.
Metal plates have been imbedded in
the roads and measurements will be
taken to determine whether the road
bed has been raised or lowered by
frost heaves during the spring period.
The purpose of the study is to test

To Sound Your Real Political
Mind Consult APsychologist

It's 1945, election time, and before
you can vote you have to go to a
licensed psychologist to establish
whether you're a Republican or Dem-
ocrat, or neither.
Fantastic? Well, at the recent con-
vention of the American Psychologi-
cal Association, Dr. Theodore F.
Lentz of Washington University out-
lined a test he had used to discover
predominant radical or conservative
tendencies in college students, and it's
only a step from that classification
to actual party divisions.
The test, given to 580 college stu-
dents in six different colleges, con-
sists of 437 statements either conser-
Ann Arbor's Canines
Enjoy Sept. Dog Days
The adage -"every dog has his
day" - was proved last Saturday
when the aristocrats and proletarians
of dogdom strutted their stuff in
Ann Arbor's annual canine parade.
The parade, in honor of National
Dog Week, was sponsored by the Ann
Arbor Kennel club. A large crowd as-
sembled to see the dogs march down
Main Street behind the Mayor, pres-
ident of the Chamber of Commerce
and a score of other dignitaries. And
the only person of importance to the
dogs absent was that terrible indi-
vidual, the dog catcher.
When the parade reached Fourth
and Catherine Streets, the dogs were
treated to ice cream. And then the
judges started in. Prizes were award-
ed for the largest dog, the smallest
dog, the largest dog and smallest
owner, the homeliest and the hand-
somest.

vative or radical in nature, and divid-
ed into six categories, religion, poli-
tics, education, sex, non-social, and
general.
After each statement the students
were told to write "yes" if they agreed
with it, "no" if they disagreed with
it. The statements were set up with
roughly half radical and half conser-
vative.
While Dr. Lentz was willing to state
that he found students on the whole
more radical in thought than "those
who are more mature in judgment,"
he refused to reveal any further sta-
tistics, inasmuch as he had given the
test merely with a view to testing its
reliability, rather than to determine
the trend of student thought.

ar

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SE6IAL§S

FOUNTAI N

PENS .....$1.00and up

Dependable ALARM CLOCKS

...98c

STATIONERY.......29c - 39c - 49c

LAUNDRY

CASES ..........$1.29

THE
ANN

A R B OR

PRESS....
'Printers of student
publications, Uni-
versity bulletins and
fine books, catalogs
for manufacturers
and advertising lit-
erature.
(-,/ gr i Istiuin

Large Assortment of Medico Pipes si*oo
1 0 Fil ters F RE E. . .. ..............
1 Camels, Luckies, Chesterfields, for 25c
Old Golds, and Raleigh Cigarettes. 2

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PHONE

DG STORE
340 South State Street

E

3534

DELIVERY SERVICE

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-IM% ll

WELCOME to all1

Do

YouKnow

THE FUTURE
TOMORROW is a time we all would like to peer into.
If we could do this we could avoid many of the set-
backs. A savings account is a substitute for foresight,
and we can provide against reverses by starting one
immediately.
Deposits in this bank are insured by the
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.
Farmers & Mechanis Bank
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM
Main at Huron State at the Arcade

that already over

225 MICHIGAN MEN
are enjoying the nique advantages
offered to members of the
MICHIGANW
A Non-Profit Student-Operated Cafeteria

MICHIGAN
TYPEWRITERS
New and Used. Large and Portable. All
makes bought, sold, rented, exchanged,
cleaned, repaired. A large stock of quality
machines at considerate prices. Conven-
ient terms may be arranged if desired.
Ask for our RENTAL PURCHASE plan;
it may save you money. Our service de-
partment is one of the best in the state.
CORRESPONDENCE STATIONERY
A complete stock of plain, Michigan, etc.,

STUDENTS
FOUNTAIN PENS
Nationally advertised makes, such as
Sheaffer, Parker, Waterman, Wahl, and
others priced $1.00 up. Service work re-
ceives careful attention.
STUDENT and OFFICE SUPPLIES
Michigan Pennants, Desk Lamps, Blotters,
Laundry Boxes, Scrap Books, Alarm
Clocks, Leather Goods, Loose Leaf Note-
books, Punched and Typewriting Paper,
Ribbons, etc. Hundreds of items too nu-

"Of, By, and For Michigan Men"

LANE HALL

202 SOUTH STATE ST.

iii

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