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November 05, 1935 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-11-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THEF MI MX DM 1bILY

Villard Makes
Criticism Of
Press Trends
feeares Expelled Students
Should Be Given Chance
To Get Hearing
(Continued from Page 1)

Rescued Norwegian Mariners Reach Detroit

R.O.T.C. Society
Will Initiate 20,

Gambling Upon
Football Games

Classified Directory

New Members Is Now Mania

0

he sighed, "has been waning recent-
ly.
He turned and suddenly faced hi
interviewer directly. "I wish yot
would quote me as saying," he de-
clared, "that it is very remarkable
that under the most progressive na-
tional administration in many years
there have been more outbreaks o:
reaction and more massing of th
conservative forces than at any tim
in the past."
"What are your views on Presiden
Roosevelt and his program, Mr. Vil-
lard?"
"I am a democrat with a small 'd,''
he smiled. "I certainly approve o:
the Roosevelt administration and it:
objectives. . But I thoroughly disap
prove of many of the President's ad-
ministrators and his methods - hi
devaluation of the dollar, his failur
to do anything radical with the tar
iff, his building up of the army an
navy."
"What about the Constitution?" h
was asked. "Should it be changed
kept intact, or completely scrapped?'
Should Change Constitution
"I think it should be altered," h
replied quickly. "Certainly the struc
ture itself should be kept, but ther
are many changes absolutely neces
sary."
In Mr. Villard's opinion, the great
est problems facing the college stu
dents today are those of "Fascismn
and reaction, of war and peace.
"There is great danger of Fas
cism," he declared earnestly. "Al
these tendencies to abridge 'the free
dom of speech, of press and of as
semblage are tendencies toward it."
Mr. Villard pooh-poohed any dan
ger from Communism. "Communisn
is negligible in this country," h
stated. "Even in these times of stres
there were only 125,000 Communisti
votes polled in the last national elec
tion. We have nothing to fear fron
Communism. Fascism is the rea
danger."
Uurges Fight Against Fascism
The New York editor was emphati
in his statement that "the choic
is between liberalism and Fascism
Because there is so little Commu
nism here, we can best fight fo
democracy by exerting all our effort
against Fascism."
Only when he was asked for a d
rect evaluation of the Russian experi
ment did Mr. Villard hedge. "I
liberalism is at one end and Fascis
at the other," he was asked, "wher
does Communism come?"
"It doesn't," he said. "It is neg
ligible."
"What is your opinion of Com
munism, Mr. Villard?"
"I'd rather not be quoted on that,
he replied. "But you can. say that
am as bitterly opposed to the Com
munistic dictatorship as I am to th
Fascist dictatorship."
As the outstanding newspaper "o
a basis of news," Mr. Villard withou
hesitation picked the New Yor
Times. "Editorially, however," he ex
plained, "I rank it way down. Fro
an editorial standpoint, I would plac
the St. Louis Post-Dispatch first."
-, Asked what he thought of the Ne
York Post, a paper on which he for
merly worked, he again replied: "I
rather not be quoted on that."
Freshman Forums
FinishedBy Unio
The last of a series of Freshma
forums sponsored by the Union t
aid new students to become adjus'
ed to University life was held yeste:
day in the north lobby of the Unio
Prof. Bennett Weaver of the En
lish department conducted the serie
of metings which prior to this ye
had been sponsored in the latter pa
of the second semester.
Students attending the forums wo
asked to submit written questionsc
the problems confronting them.

-Associated Press Photo.
Members of the crew of the Norwegian freighter, Viator, rammed
and sunk by the motorship Ormidale off Thunder Bay Island in Lake
Huron, are shown as they waved a greeting upon arriving in Detroit 36
hours after the disaster. All members were rescued by the Ormidale.
Prof.*VnderVelde Describes
Hi0or Blind ots n a

Men Must Perform Menial
Tasks, Stand Night Vigil
Before Induction
Twenty new members will be in-
itiated into Scabbard and Blade, hon-
orary military society, next Sunday.>
The initiation will mark the end
of a hectic "hell-week" during which
period the future members are being
made to perform sundry menial tasks.
In addition to wearing their com-
pulsory blue denim uniforms, the
new members must meet every nightI
this week for drill. They have to,
polish the members' boots and
plaques, and in general, must do the
bidding of the fortunate men who are
already full-fledged members.
Saturday the new men will con-
vene for a walk to the fresh air camp.
After their return, they will 'stand
guard all night by the Scabbard and
Blade plaque, which is located neari
the flagpole on the campus.
The all night vigil will culminate in
the formal initiation at 8 a.m. Sun-
day, in front of the plaque. The men
to be initiated are: Carl Abbott, How-
ard Braun, Philip Buckminster,
George Cannon, William DeRamus,
Jr., Jack Gustafson, Dan Hulgrave,
Tom Jensen, Paul Pinkerton, Charles
Swartout, Stanley Thomas, Frederick
King, Earl Morrow, Ralph Price,
Richard Sinn, Elbert Carpenter, Paul
Minnear, Melvin Hyatt, Carl Beers,
and Richard Shappell.
Williams Students
Carry Nazi Flags
At Oath Ceremony
WILLIAMSTON, Mass., Nov. 5. -
(P) - Students of Williams College
arranged a musical comedy setting
today for a ceremony in which the
faculty members took their oaths of
allegiance to the Constitution re-
quired by a new state law.
Flag-waving students thronged the
campus, goose-stepping, clicking their
heels, and giving Nazi salutes in cele-
bration of an official but satirical
"Red, White, and Blue Day." Fra-
ternity houses were decked in bunt-
ing.
l One of the three students, carry-
ing a large swastika flag, was Fran-
s cis B. Sayre, Jr., son of the assistant
secretary of state and grandson of
President Wilson. He was born in
. the White House.
Behind them marched two youths
with fife and drum representing "the
spirit of '36." Heels clicked as a
campus throng saluted the Nazi flag
in burlesque.

(continued from Page 6)
the racket to earn money, not dis-
tribute it, have made things a little
harder for the betting fans. They
don't select just any games for the
fans to bet on; they choose a few
toss-ups and throw in an "open-and-
shut" affair or two in which', it must
be added, the under-dog outfit may
be counted on for an upset now
and then.
Winning methods are now an open
secret to all coaches, therefore a na-
tural corollary is that "little" teams
are going to knock over "big" ones
with disconcerting regularity. So
now the football favorites are win-
ning a little less than 85 per cent
of the time, another sports author-
ity says, and in some sections, he
adds, the favorites win cnly 70 per
cent of the time.
One of the sports scribes, possibly
a bit more cynical than the rest,
tosses the whole perplexity overboard
in this wise,:
"It must be the better's weakness
- the animal in him, or something.
The experts certainly don't fool
themselves. You could walk a week
without finding a football coach who
bets on his own selections."
And so the football gambling
merry-go-'round whirls in its dis-
astrous and expensive circles. The
betting fan grows gloomy and sour on
amateur football and eyes his de-
flated purse with misgivings.
Coughlin Lays Down
New Annual Program
DETROIT, Nov. 5.-(A)-The Rev.
Father Charles E. Coughlin launched
his National Union for Social Jus-
tice today upon a new annual pro-
gram he said would include "an open
hunting season on members of con-
gress."
Opening a series of radio addresses
Sunday afternoon, Father Coughlin
divided his time between a reitera-
tion of the 16 principles on which he
founded his National Union.
0 - n .1

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'I,

II

Declares Many Materials
- Destroyed Which Might
Complete State History
- By DONALD T. SMITH
.l Prof. Lewis G. VanderVelde of the
- history department gave the fourth
- talk in the Michigan, My Michigan
series yesterday afternoon from Mor-
- ris Hall'over WJR, choosing Michi-
n gan's blank spots of history as the
e subject of his radio talk. This series
s of talks has been arranged to inform
C Michigan students and citizens of the
- natural resources, industries, educa-
n tional facilities, and history of their
l State.
"We have had some excellent writ-
ing upon the story of our State, but
[ many important phases of that story
e still remain to be adequately told. The
reason for these blank spots in Michi-
- gan's history is a very simple one:
r the materials upon which a proper
,s account must be based are not avail-
able to students and writers.
-_ "And the reason for this fact is
simple: thesematerials, where they
f have not been lost or destroyed, are
n lying about unused, unappreciated, in
'e cellars, or attics, or store-room. Per-
haps some of them are lying in your
homes," he stated.
Tells Of Graduate's Work
i- The experience of a graduate stu-
dent in history, who planned to write
a history of the anti-slavery move-
I ment in Michigan, was used as an
- example. Professor VanderVelde
Le went on to say: "For years we have
knowni something about the anti-
n slavery movement in our State, but
it there are two very common miscon-
'k ceptions about it. One is that Michi-
gan was relatively unimportant in the
m. movement against slavery. This is a
e very bad mistake indeed. The other
is that such activities as there were
w against slavery were confined to the
- underground railroad.
'd "Now the underground railroad in
our State was important, but it con-
stitutes only one phase of the anti-
slavery movement in Michigan. The
graduate suspected that there was a
good deal more to the story, but he
n found very little in the University li-
brary or any other libraries in the
State to bear out his suspicion.
n Gathered Much Evidence
to "However, after considerable ef-
tfort during the past few months he
- has managed to get together a mass
n. of' evidence to bolster up his theory.
g- Where did he get his evidence? For
es the most part, in materials stored in
ar private homes." Several specific ex-
rt amples were shown to prove the dif-
ficult task the writer had to'obtain
re his material.
of "With this to start with." the speak-
er continued, "the writer had only

begun his work. He already had ample
proof that the anti-slavery movement
in this State was anything but unim-
portant. He plans before he is
through to round out his materials
in such a way as to be able to furnish
a complete list of anti-slavery work-
ers; to measure the amount of time
and effort spent in the cause; to dis-
cover how widely the various churches
and denominations participated in
the movement; to trace the relation-
ship of the anti-slavery movement to
other reforms of the time, to the
splits in political parties, to the social
and intellectual issues of the period,
If he is able to do this, then," Profes-
sor VanderVelde said, "one of the
worst blind spots in Michigan history
will be removed."
"Michigan history, in spite of the
fact that much of it has been wel
picture by historians, remains very
spotted," he continued. "The spots
in the picture are Gue to the
fact that painters did not have the
materials to fill in, in many places
Until the materials from which his-
tory is told have been gathered in
places accessible to writers of history
there will still be a good many blind
spots in the story.
Urges Gathering Of Data
"It seems particularly fitting that
in these years from 1935 to 1937
when we are paying so much atten-
tion to the celebration of the anni-
versary of Michigan's statehood, tha
a serious effort should be made in
the direction of gathering together
these materials. I may add that ef
forts of this sort will receive the very
heartiest support of Dr. George N.
Fuller of the State Historical Com
mission, who for years has been lab
:ring in this direction."
"Vou will notice that my plea i
that materialsbe located in a librar
. .e ┬▒sey will be safe from de
truction and misuse, and open to th
ase of scholars. Such as library
should, it seemes to me, meet thre
specific qualifications: it should b
fireproof; it should have adequat
facilities for the expert care an
preservation of manuscripts an
other rare materials; and it shoul
be accessible and readily usable b
research students," Professor Vander
Velde concluded.

'!
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