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March 30, 1935 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1935-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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MICHIGAN DAILY

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PubilE.red every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in Con-
trol of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the 'Big Ten News Service.
MEMeR
cA5sodte4d fgf f.lite ' rss
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MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper ani the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special dis-
patches are reserved.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carier, $100; by mail,
1.50. During regular school year by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$.50.
Offices: Student Publications Biding, Maynard Street.
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: National Advertising Service, Inc. 11
West 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. - 400 N. Michigan Ave.,
Chicago, In.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR ................WILLIAM G. FERRIS
CIT EDITOR..... .........JOHN HEAEY
f!ITORIAL DIRECTOR......RALPH G.,COULTER
SPORTS EDITOR ..................ARTUR CARSTENS
WOAEN'S EDITOR ......................EILE.ANOR BLUM
NIGHT EDITORS: Courtney A. tvans, John J. Flaherty,
Thomas E. Groehn, Thomas 1. leen, David G. Mac-
donald, John M. O'Connell, Arthur M. Taub.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Marjo'ie Western, Kenneth Parker,
William Reed, Arthur Settle.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Barbara L. Bates, Dorothy Gies,
Florence Harper, Meanr Johnson, Josephine McLean,
Margaret D. Phalan, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider,
Marie Murphy.
REPORTERS: Rex Lee Beach, Robert B. Brown, Clinton B.
Conger, Sheldon M. Ellis, William H. Fleming, Richard
G. Hershey, Ralph W. Hurd, Bernard Levick, Fred W.
Neal, Robert Pulver, Lloyd S. Reich, Jacob C. Seidel,
Marshall D. Shulman, Donald Smith, Wayne H. Stewart,
Bernard Wessman, George Andros, Fred Buesser, Rob-
ert Cummins, Fred DeLano, Robert J. Friedman, Ray-
mond Goodman, Keith H. Tustison, Joseph Yager.
Dorothy Briscoe, Florence Davies, Helen Diefendorf,
Elaine Goldberg,. Betty Goldstein, Olifve Griffith, Har-
riet Hathaway, Marion Holden, Lois King, Selma Levin,
Elizabeth Miller, Melba Merrison, Elsie Pierce, Charlotte
Rueger Dorothy Shappell, Molly Solomon, Laura Wino-
grad. Jewel Wuerfe.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER...............RUSSELL B. READ
CREDIT MANAGER.................ROBERT S. WARD
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER......JANE BASSETT
DEPARTMENT MANAGEE& 'Los-Advert Ing, John Og 0-
den; Service Departmient. ernr d Rserfhal; Contracts,
Joseph Rothbard; Accounts, Cameron Hall; Circulation
and National Advertising, David Winkwrorth; Classified
Advertising and Publications, George Atherton.
BUSINESS ASSISTANTS: William Jackson, William
Barndt, Ted Wohgemuith, Lyman Bttman, John Park,
F. Allen psoni, Willi Toinsot', Homrer Lathrop, Tom
Clarke, Gordon Cohn, Merrell Jordan, Stanley Joffe,
Richard E. Chaddock,
WOMEN'S BUSINESS STAFF: Betty Cavender, Margaret
Cowie, Bernadine Field, Betty Greve, Mary Lou Hooker,
Helen Shapland, Betty Simonds, Marjorie Langenderfer,
Grace Snyder, Betty Woodworth, Betsy Baxter, Margaret
Bentley, Anne Cox, Jane Evans, Ruth Field, Jean Guon,
Mildred Haas, Ruth Lipkint, Mary McCord, Jane Wil-
loughby.
NIGHT EDITOR: DAVID G. MACDONALD
The Roller
Skate Menace. .
T HE CONFISCATION by Detroit po-
lice of the roller skates of youths
vho insist upon using the public streets as a place
for their recreation, reminds us that we have a local
situation which is fully as distressing.
Every year, with the advent of spring, local grade
and high school students and even some University
students make a practice of using the Diagonal for
their skating activities. It has always been a source
of annoyance for students attempting to study in
the General Library and at times it is practically
impossible to concentrate in any University build-
ings flanking the sidewalks.
Added to this, the fearless attitude on the part
of the young devils on wheels has introduced an
acute traffic and pedestrian problem. What is the
city going to do with these roller skaters who per-
sistently believe that they have the right-of-way
on sidewalk and street?
The building and grounds department partially
solved the problem last year by spreading fine
gravel over the sidewalks on the Diagonal, making
skating impossible. So far this year this has not
been done. But spreading gravel, although it
might solve the problem, is not conducive to com-
fortable walking, and we would suggest that the
Detroit system be instituted in its place.
The Diagonal is University property, and build-

ing and grounds employees would have every right
to confiscate skates of offenders. Bicycles are
prohibited on the Diagonal and a number have
been taken away from violators, so why shouldn't
the same system succeed with the skaters?

discovered to render him vulnerable to attack.
The motto of the anti-Hearst element should not
be the blind: "Don't Read Hearst!" but like "Watch
Red Grange," or "Watch Friedman," a warning.
"Watch Hearst!"
The Jamboree
Deserves Support. . .
T1HE ALL-CAMPUS JAMBOREE next
Tuesday for the benefit of the Uni-
versity Fresh Air Camp, is worthy of the support
of all students and townspeople.
Many benefit performances depend for their sup-
port, on the good work they do alone. This has
never been the case with the Student Christian As-
sociation-sponsored Jamboree. Everyone that has
ever atended one of these performances has re-
ceived his money's worth in entertainment as well
as the satisfaction of helping underprivileged boys.
This year's Jamboree will be no exception. With
such national artists as Tony Wons and Sylvia
Clark plus the talents of the Glee Club and the
League Trio, and the appearance of J. Fred Lawton
as master of ceremonies, the Jamboree audience
is assured a full evening.
The Student Christian Association should be
congratulated on, and supported in, the work it is
doing. Students can best evidence their support by
attending the Jamboree.
This year's average freshmen is three pounds
heavier, an inch taller and has a chest girth one
and one-half inches greater than the average youth
(if his age. We didn't think athletic subsidization
would stand out like that.

COL LEG IATE
OBSERVER

By BUD BERNARD
There was a proud father of a Delta Gam
at the University of California who thought
that no place in the world was there a girl
as wonderful as his daughter. Every chance
he had he would talk about her and try to
imiress everyone that she was a marvel. One
evening a new caller, incidentally a college
man, arrived at his home to take his daughter
tc a party. While they waited for the girl to
finish powdering her nose, the father spoke
to the young collegian about his daughter.
"Yes, my son," he said, "the man that marries
my daughter gets a prize."
"Can I see it?" was the startling request.
Mae West. the gal who has done more to educate
the youth of our nation than many professors says
in the Wisconsin Daily Cardinal that "a well-
rounded figure is much more attractive than a
well-rounded education," and she's not talking
about mathematics.
"To keep a man," she says, "just let him talk.
And that's all I can tell any girl about men.
"But there are other problems . . . such as what
to do with a man after you get him. I haven't
found any use for one yet."
When a lot of ciphers line up behind another
cipher that's too bad, says a student at In-
diana University, but when a mass of siphers
line up behind a diget, brother, that's Huey
Long.
** *
Here's one way to stop overcrowding in the
journalism profession. Cornell school of journal-
ism decided students should report at 7 a.m. daily,
so that they might be acclimated to the working
hours of reporters on afternoon papers. There was
a sudden ceasing of the large number who they
felt had a yen for writing.

I

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Modernize
Your KITCHEN Now.

i

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..._.-.- ' ._...11
_

DURING OUR
OLD-STOVE ROUND-UP

The SOAP BOXj
Letters published in this column should not be
construed as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous contributions will be disregarded.
The names of communicants will, however, be regarded
as confidential upon request. Contributors are asked to
be brief, the editor reserving the right to condense
all letters of over 300 words.
Prosperity For Vine Center
To the Editor:
Me and Zeke wuz settin' around t'other night,
tryin' to calculate jest whut we might do with ary
extry piece of change we might git providin' we got
rid of all th' hogs and corn this year ...
... Us two wuz a speakin' our minds about the
situation, when Ephriam and Ebner and a couple
of other boys come a slouphin' in and stood there
a-gawkin' with their hands a fiddlin' with their
galuses, and scrapin' ther shoes on the backs o
ther' briches legs ...
"Wall, shucks," Eph started in, "ain't youal heerd
'bout the new plan fer gittin' rich, and havin'
plenty shoes and two coats and a second hand
Chevy under yer shed? Hit's all bin told 'bout over
th',radio."
Me and Zeke looks up sorta startled like and tells
him that we ain't cause we ain't had no radio, it
bein' busted since Zeke throwed the Bible at it
back sdme weeks.
"Wa'al now, chucks," Eph kept on, while Ebner
and th' others nodded fer him to go ahead and
let us in, on it. "Hit's jest that jest as soon as
Huey Long gits ta be president, why they ain't
nothin' else fer him t'do but order in all th' money
whut them big corn buyers and city fellers is got
to and divvy it up to all us fellers on th' farms.
'Course, like as not, he'll whack off a little bit and
give it to some of them little city fellers whut is
hongry and ain't got but one pair o' shoes, ner
no autymobile, but we reckons he aims to split
most of it with us farmers.", Eph stopped and
sort a cotched his breath ...
"Shucks," I told Eph, "tain't no use worryin'
'bout it so early is they? 'Pears as they ain't 'lec-
tion till sometime in 1936 and me and Zeke's got
to raise another crop so's we kin make ends meet."
And then I addid somethin' 'bout ends meetin'
with a strand 'r two left over, fer th' past year,
which wuz differnt frum whut we had reckoned it
would be seein' as how bad off th' farmers wuz put
by rains, and dry spells and them 1928 polyticians.
But Eph and th' boys, all got to clamorin' and
talkin' loud 'bout this hyar new plan of Mr.
Huey's bein' easy as heck, and me and Zeke won-
dered how come nobody else had ever thought
of it afore now.
Whereupon Eph said that "it wuz jest that
them other big fellers in Washington ain't had our
sitiation at heart like Huey has, and that Huey
ain't got no pertikler reason fer wantin' to be
boss ceptin' that he's got a friendly streak in him
as wants every feller to have two suits o' clothes
and plenty of grub, and a insurancepolicy, and
edication such as is to be had in great schools
like Herverd, Yell, and Lusiany State."
Zeke, a-stretchin hisself, it being now 'bout 8:30
and past bedtime, reckoned that if a feller got
too much of sich handiness give him he wouldn't
do no work, and reckoned farther that fer a
feller not ta work would make him lazy and no-
count, and anyway if they warn't no work done
th' hogs wouldn't git fed ner th' corn planted.
Wa'al Eph and Ebner and th' others reckoned
they might like t' have a little more time off work
to set on a holler log and whittle, not tountin'
Sundays. They argyd that as long as there wuz
heeps o' money in the vaults at New York and
Washington, jest layin' there gettin' musty, it
might as well git used fer us farmers to git new
suits and sich.
. ..Me and Zeke ain't up on them radio talks
yit, but we aim's to jest as soon as th' radio gits
fixed. Course it all 'pears sort o' silly to me and
Zeke, but we got to study it a bit more.
--Lum Tinker.
Among the casualties of a tornado that ripped
through southwest Alabama recently were one
deer, 16 squirrels and a wild turkey. Which made
it less disastrous than the work of an average
man with a shotgun, who usually adds another
hunter to his collection.

g
.

..........

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$ 00R
ALLOWANCE
FOR YOUR OLD STOVE !
$.75 down
MONTHS TO PAY
T THE BALANCE!

* * *

*

They are talking about the co-ed at the Uni-
versity of Illinois who said she wanted to
work in an ammunition plant so that she would
have lots of arms around her.
* * * *
This story from Boston University took place
in an anatomy lab where a couple of would-be med-
ics were dissecting a cat:
"Tom," said the first.
"Yes," said the second.
"Where's your right hand?"
"Why it's holding the cat's head."
"Then, where's your left hand?"
"It's right here, why?"
"In that case," murmured the first with a sigh
of relief, "I've just cut through the feline's leg."

MAGIC CHEF TABLE TOP
$76.50 Selling Price
$20.00 Old-Stove Allowance
$56.50 Plus Tax InstalIed

A NY N EW CA BI NET TYPE tA NGEI INCL UDE D IN TH IS SALE
Trade in your old, worn-out, inefficient stove fr, a Modern
Automatic MAGIC CHEF Gas Range! You'll enjoy the new-
type burners, easy-to-clean surfaces, and the insulated oven.

I

I

A Washington
BYSTANDER

--

0.

[1

By KIRKE SIMPSON

WASHINGTON, March 29.
J HE WHISPER passed about on Capitol Hill that
the White House wants its whole program
shoved through this session, paving the way for a
brief and "harmonious" pre-campaign session next
year, was expected whether it
: "actually started at the White
House or not. Nothing could
be sweeter from a White House
i view than to do it that way.
Carrying over into next ses-
sion any proportion of the leg-
islative hard nuts to crack al-
" ready laid or to be laid on Con-
gress' doorsteps by the President
would only add to uncertainties
as to getting them cracked at
all. Any election-year Congress
BYRNS is a more difficult leadership
job than an off-year session.
Legislators up for a battle to retain their seats,
which means all House seats and a third of the
Senate, will have to begin thinking and voting
-in direct relation to near approaching primaries
as soon as the '36 session convenes next January.
* * * *
THE OFF-YEAR SESSION is the only breathing
space for House Members - and a lot of new
House Democrats have not yet caught their breath
after the surprise in '34 at their own election.
Keeping them in order behind administration plans
next session will be a harder task for Speaker Byrns
et. al. of the House general staff.
The political repercussions likely to flow out
of individual votes on bonus payment offers an
example. It is so near right now to overthrowing
a presidential veto that Democratic leaders express
no more than a pious hope the Senate will stand
fast if it comes to that. In an election year, with
a third of the Senate membership up, they hardly
would voice even that hope.
That is one strong argument unquestionably be-
ing advanced in inmost administration circles for
compromising the bonus issue out of the way before
next year. If it is just beaten by the negative
process of a veto narrowly sustained in the Sen-
ate, back it will come next year with far less pros-
pect of whipping the measure into such shape that
the White House could accept, even if it did not
like it much.
* * * *
BUT A STUDY of Roosevelt strategy to date
would indicate that it was not so general a
look ahead that prompted whatever word may
have been passed along to hill leaders to push the
whole program. The President himself repeatedly
has pictured himself as skipper of a football team,
calling the next plays as results of the last effort
seemed to justify.

MAGIC
SERIES

MAGIC CLEF
SERIES 200
$77.50 LESS ALLOWANCE

CHEF

i

S2100

$85.50 LESS ALLOWANCE

See these Ranges on display at our dealer's or at our office.
WASHTENAWU GAS COMPANY
211 EAST HURON STREET

Religious Activitiles

t

Keeping Abreast
Of Hearst . .

The Fellowship of
Liberal Religion
(UNITARIAN)
State and Huron Streets
5:15
:RETURN OF
PERSEPHONE"
Family servi-e with buffet supper.
7:30
LIBERAL STUDENTS' UNION
Discussion.
First Methodist
Episcopal Church
State and Washington
Charles W. Brashares, Minister
L. Laverne Finch, Minister
A. Taliaferro, Music
9:45 A.M. - Classfor young men and
women of college age. Dr. Roy J.
Burroughs will lead the discus-
sion. Meet in the balcony of the
church auditorium.
10:45 A.M.-Morning Worship Service
"WHY LOVE?"

Hillel Foundation
Corner East University and Oakland
Dr. Bernard Reller, Director,
11:15 A.M. - Sermon at the Women's
League Chapel by Dr.' Bernard
Heller-
"Maimonides - A
Medievalist's Contribution
to Modernism"
8:00 P.M. - Open forum at the
Foundation led by Dr. Jacob Sacks
of the Pharmacology Dept.- "The
Scientific Attitude in Social Prob-
lems."
Call the Foundation for reservations
for Passover meals.

Zion Lutheran
Church
Washington at Fifth Avenue
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor
9:00 A.M. - Children's service. Ser-
mon subject, "A Fisherman and A
Fisher of Men."
10:30 A.M. - Service with sermon on,
"THE LAW PURIFY-
ING LIFE"
Text, Psalm 119, 9-16
5:30 P.M. - Student fellowship and
supper.
6:30 P.M. - Student forum with
address by Rev. H. Yoder, -Test-
ing for Values."
LENTEN SERVICE
Wednesday at 7:30 P.M.
Sermon, "John the Apostle"
St. Paul's Lutheran
(Missouri Synod)
West Liberty and Third Sts.
Rev. C. A. Brauer.Pastor
9:30 A.M. - Lenten Service in Ger-
man. "The Mockery."
10:45 A.M. - Morning Service- Ser-
mon by the pastor.
"AARON'S ROD
BLOSSOMS"

(,{, ON'T READ HEARST!" is the
1.1 warning printed on lapel buttons
at present being distributed by some anti-Hearst
organization, in the hopes of fighting the syndi-
cate owner with a boycott.
Unfortunately there seems to be little chance of
reducing the mass reading public of Mr. Hearst's
papers by the simple expedient of a boycott by
the comparative few who thoroughly hate his
methods and recognize their danger.
The prospect of such a movement is that it would
have an actual weakening effect on the anti-Hearst
forces. During the World War the teaching of
German was stopped in the public schools of Amer-

LENT TIME
IS
CHURCH

A news item says that 154 of 156
the Arizona State Teachers College

graduates of
have gainful

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