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December 09, 1934 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-12-09

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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1934

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FACE SEW14

THE M.. a at L111CVWAN:1 I21A Ai V PAGE SE"VE"

Strong Purdue
Quintet Opens,
Season Monday

Notre Dame Back Who Starred Yesterday

Big Ten Champions
Lost Three Men,
1933-34 Regulars

Have
From

DICKINSON RATINGS
CHAMPAIGN, Ill., Dec. 3. - (P)
-Professor Dickinson, of the Uni-
versity of Illinois, announced his
selections for the 1934 football sea-
son, today.
Team W L T Pts.
Minnesota....8 0 0 23.51
Pittsburgh..... 1 0 23.19
Columbia ......'7 1 0 23.00
Illinois .........7 1 0 22.01
nice Institute ..9 1 1 21.97
Alabama ......9 0 0 21.70
Navy ..........8 1 0 21.67
Ohio State .....7 1 0 21.51
Colgate........7 1 0 21.06
Stanford......9 0 1 20.34

Faculty Ruling Bars 3 Gopher
Gridders From Further Play,
Conti-ued from Page 1) prospects. We'll show them some
years of competition permitted in pretty good football. Ii means we
the Big Ten. have to use more unseasoned men,
Coach Bernie Bierman, of the have to develop more slowly and havel
Gophers, 1934 champions of the West- to fill vacancies we had not foreseen:
Gophrs,1934chapion ofthebut we have some good boys and I am~
ern Conference, was upset over the sure they will bear down harder in
iuling. -response to the emergency and will
"The rule as it is reaffirmed, is not do all they can to make a winning
cnjy unfair but impossible to enforce," team. We do not seem to be very suc-
he said. ( cessful at winning arguments in star
"It hurts us heav iy. i am not en- chamber sessions, but maybe we can
tirely discouraged, however, about our still win a few on the football field."

SCHEDULE ANNOUNCED
CHICAGO, Dec. 8 -(M)- Coach
Ray Fisher arranged an 11-game
Conference baseball schedule today
at the Big Ten meeting here, in
concurrence with Big Ten base-
ball coaches, for the 1933 season.
Following is the Michigan sched-
ule:
April 19 and 20, at Ohio State;
April 23, Northwestern at Mich-
igan; April 27, Wisconsin at Mich-
igan; May 4, Illinois at Michigan;
May 10 and 11, Ohio State at Mich-
igan; May 17, at Purdue; May 18,
at Illinois; May 24, at Northwest-
ern; May 25, at Wisconsin.

How successful Purdue's basketballt
quintet will be in its defense of the
Big Ten cage title will probably be
discovered this week as a result of its
play in its opening games against4
three exceptionally strong secondary
teams. Monday night the Boiler-
makers meet the fast-breaking West-
ern State team, and then played De-
Pauw and Wabash within the week.
Graduation hit the team hard.
Ray Eddy, flashy ,forward, who was
named honorary captain of the
championship five, Emmett Lowrey,
All-Conference guard, and Dutch
Fehring, the versatile center on last
years squad, were lost. In addition
George Fisher, star reserve center,
didn't return to school.
This has left Coach Lampert with
only co-captains Norman Cottom
and Ed Shaver to form the nucleus
of his team this eason. In 1933 Cot-
tom was All-American forward, but
whether he will be able to repeat this
performance this season is a ques-
tion that cannot be answered for
some time yet.
Judging from his performance in
the early practice sessions, Bob Kes-
sler will probably start as Cottom'sj
running mate at the forward posi-
tion. Kessler specializes in drives un-
der the basket and should pair well
with the veteran forward.
At the center position Coach Lam-
bert has Ed Elliott, letterman from
last season, and Jim Seward, lanky
six foot seven inch sophomore, who
at present is the choice for the pivot
position in the opener. If Seward
proves able to fill up the hole that
Fehring left, it will be a relief to
Lambert for his type of offense re-
quires a capable center.
Charles Meade and Austin Lam-
bert, two, of the eighteen letter win-
ners last year, are the leadingcandi-
dates for the floor guard berth. Both
have seen plenty of service in their
two years on the squad and should
prove capable successors to Lowrey.!
Shaver is a sure starter at back
guard, but he will be pushed hard
throughout the season by Cliff Baum-
back, the rangy sophomore, who
played regular end on the grid eleven.
The Boilermakers play twelve
games with Conference schools. In
meeting Wisconsin, Northwestern,
and Indiana they are taking on three
of the most dangerous quintets in
the Big Ten and they will have to
play exceptional ball to approach the
record that they made in winning
their championship. The other Con-
ference teams are Illinois, Ohio State.
and Chicago.
It is not very probable that Coach
Lambert will change the style of play
from that which has been so suc-
cessful in the last few years. The
only likely change will come if Sew-
ard's pivot shots prove exceptionally
dangerous. In this event Lambert l
may slow down the play in order to
give the center a chance to take a
greater number of shots under the
basket.

You

Shoud

Wol]L-Y***

You ave Plenty of Corpa y
On the "Diagonal"

-Associated Press Photo
Andy Pilney, Notre Dame backfield star, threw a forward pass to
Wayne Milner, whc .made a remarkable catch. Frank Layden, brother of
Head Coach Elmer Layden carried the call over on the next play for the
second touchdown scored against Southern California yesterday before
50,000 football fans at Los Angele.
Pilney, who comes from Chicago has been the daminant spark in
the Iish backfield all searon. He is also a star ba'cball player at the
South Bend school playing in thv Notre Dame team's outfield.
Dizzy Dean And Bo1)Quinn Say
That Righthanders Fil The Bill
CHICAGO, Dec. 8.- (P)- Three away in the major leagues every year
baseball nabobs were in a huddle be- by some manager who thinks he has
hind a post in a Louisville hotel Ito have at least one good lefty on
lobby, waving their arms and accus- 'his mound staff."
ing each other of attempted grand I

Send Your Last Year's Coat

to GREENE'S-.-

- -

We'll Put it in Shape to
Weather Another Long Winter

I

larceny.v
"We've got to have a left-hander,
but I'll be If we will make a
deal like that," one shouted.' That
would be highway robbery. Why -"
Just then his pitching highness, Je-;
rome Herman ("Dizzy") Dean, busted
in.
"Hey, what's all this argument and
talk about left-handers? It seems all
you guys are nuts about lefties. What
can they do that I can't?"
Agrees With DizzyI
The nabobs scratched their heads.
The huddle broke up. Bob Quinn, gen-
eral manager of the Brooklyn Dodg-
ers, strolled over and said:
"Dizzy is right. It's long been a
great mystery to me why club owners
and managers have to have a left-
hander on their pitching staff. As Diz-A
zy says, what can a southpaw do
that a right-hander can't. I'll tell
you. Nothing. If I had my choice of
a staff of five good right-handers or
five southpaws or even three good
lefties and two good right-handers,
I'd take the five right handers any
day. Thousands of dollars are thrown,

With that, Quinn, one of the
shrewdest nabobs in the game, reeled
of a list 'of great right-handers
Among them were Christy Mathew-
son, Mordecai Brown, Ed Walsh, the
Dean brothers, Wild Bill Donovan,
Cy Young, Walter Johnson, Grover
Alexander, Charlie Radbourne, and
so on down the line of the pitching
immortals of the game.
No, sir," said Quinn, "you car
have all the Groves and Hubbells if
you give me the Cy Youngs, Walter
Johnsons and Dizzy Deans."
Not in the memory of Quinn and
many other baseball magnates ha;
the demand for southpaw pitchers
been so great as it is today. Scouts
havo been ordered to comb the minors
with a fine comb to locate port-
siders.
Winter Means a Heavy Coat.
Have Last Year's Altered
and Cleaned at
John's Tailor Shop
"Ann Arbors Popular Tailor"
609 Packardi

X'XJ E call it Su per-Service"
you call it what you may.
The point we wish to stress is that
we offer a COMPLETE VALET
SERVICE... besides our regular
force in the cleaning plant we re-
tain at all times a skilled tailor and
a proficient dressmaker to alter,
remodel and repair suits and coats.
Remember that when you send in
your last year's coat for Micro-
cleaning.

?WOMEN'S
SP O R TS
Five members of the executive c
mittee of the Washtenaw County.
sociation of Women's Basketballt
ficials attended a meeting in Lans
yesterday. Those who represented
organization are: Prof. Laurie
Campbell, Miss Virginia Pease
Gertrude Morris, '35Ed., Ruth R
'35Ed, and Lavinia Creighton, '35
The meeting was held with two ot
local boards, those of Detroito
Battle Creek.
The purpose of the meetingN
to establish local boards of offic
in all sections of the state. Thi
part of the movement to encoun
more women to take basketball>
ings. The attempt is being made
have all games officiated by rated,
erees and umpires.
The Novice Riding Club, under
direction of Gordon McDon
is now practicing gymnastics
horseback. If the riders become su
ciently proficient, a "monkey" d
will be held before the end of the s
son. Plans are also being made
tests to be given this semester,
that women from this organizat
may be proposed for membership
Crop and Saddle, should any
cancies occur.

LOOK YOUR BEST-
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omn-
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A Tailored Overcoat is
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We Starut at
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Are

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your FORMALS
your GLOVES
your HATS
your FURS
your SWEATERS

your LEATHER JACKETS
your SUITS
your RIDING BREECHES
your TIES
your SCARFS
your SPATS

Ready for Witer?

I V

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broiled
tenderloin
steak
dinner

GREEN E'S
CLEANERS 8' DYERS
ICROCLE
-...--_ _

IN

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