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May 12, 1934 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
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The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-12

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THlE MIHiGAN DAILY

;AN DILY

-=-

-- .
-- .

aeeaSeDn'orNTMra am arntl ALWANa . .
Puonshed every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
lnd the Big Ten News Service.
rssociattd l elle _te _$
m-:1933s a bCsniA94
,AEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is encusivel entitled to the use
fer republication of all news dipathcs credited to it or
not otherwise credited In thi paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at the 2ost Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as
second class matter. Special rate of postage. granted by
Third Aistant Postmaster-General.
SBbscriitlon during summer by carrier, $1.00; by mail,
$1.50 . During regula school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mai, $4.25.
Offlces: Student Publicatms Building, Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives:. College Publications Representativs
Inc., 4 East Thirty-Fourtl Street, Nw York City; 80
Boylson Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4825
MANAGING EDITOR.......THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
CITY EDITOR.... ...........BAtACKLEY SHAW
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR.......C. PAT SCHAAF
SPORTS EEWTOI ...............ALBET H, NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR..................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: A. Ruts Bail, Raiph G. Coulter William
G. Ferris, John C, Healey, George Van Vieck, E, Jerome
Pettit.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Arthur W. Car-
etens, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Beck, Eleanor Blum,
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: C. Bradford Carpenter, Paul J. Elliott,
Courtney A. Evans, John J. Flaherty, Thomas A. Groehn,
John Kerr, Thomas H. Keene, Bernard B. Levick, David
G. MacDonald, Joel P. Newman, John M. O'Connell,
Kenneth Parker, William R. Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch
- Arthur S. Settle, Jacob C. Seidel, Marshall D. Silverman,
Arthur M. Taub.
Dorothy Glep, Jean Hanmer, Florence Harper, Eleanor
Johnson, Ruth Loebs, Josephine McLean, Marjorie Mor-
rison, Sally Place, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGER.............W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER ............BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER ....................
... ........................ CATARINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Noel Tur-
ner; Classified Advertising, Russell Read Advertising
Service, Robert Ward; AccountsAllen Knuusi: Circula-
tion and Contracts, Jack Efroymson.
ASSISTANTS: Milton Kramer, John Ogden, Bernard Ros-
enthal, Joe Rothbard, George Atherton.
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Mary Bursley, Peggy Cady,
Virginia Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevieve !-ied, Louise
F orez, Doris Gimmy, Betty Greve, Billie Griffiths,Janet
Jackson, Louise Krause, Barbara Morgan, Margaret
Mustard, Betty Simond.
FRESHMAN TRYOUTS: William Jackson, Louis Gold-
smith, David Schiffer, William Barndt, Jack Richardson,
Charles Parker, Robert Owen, Ted Wohgemuth, Jerome
Grossman, Avnr, Kronenberger, Jim Horiskey, Tom
Clarke, Scott, Samuel Beckman, Homer Lathrop, Hall,
Ross Laevin, Willy Tomlinson, Dean Asselin, Lyman
Bittmnan, John Park,DonHutton,Allen Ulpsn, Richard
Hardenbrook, Gordon Cohn. ..
NIGHT EDITOR: A. ELLIS BALL
Experts Vs.
Popular ' Apathy.
D ESPITE THE FACT that Ann Arbor
citizens are unanimously agreed
that they want an improved water supply, the pos-
sibility ofdany change in our present system seems
to be sadly remote.
There are two principal obstacles to any plan
of improvement.
First, the manner of financing a plant for either
improving the water from the present source or,for
utilizing water from the Huron, is not altogether
clear. Funds for such a venture must come from
the issuance of .either a public obligations bond
or a revenue bond. Ann Arbor has already ful-
filled its quota of public obligations bond issues,
and the legality of a revenue bond isue is now
being questioned before the State Supreme Court,
where the city is striving to obtain legal sanction
to the Sewage Disposal Plant revenue bond.
Thus there exists considerable doubt whether
the city could finance the measure.
The second obstacle is the people themselves.
The Council, cognizant of the fact that many of
their constituency hold rather strong views on the
subject, would hesitate to take it upon themselves
to decide upon the manner of the improvement
of the supply. It is likely that the matter will have
to be decided at the polls, and, even more certain
that the vote would be such that -it would make
any action impossible; for there are many among
the laity who are strongly prejudiced each way..
It should not be necessary for the people to
decide upon the manner by which the imrove-

ment should be accomplished; it should suffice
that they express their desire for some improve-
ment, and that technical experts, hired by the
city, should on the basis of their experience decide
the question of what manner is most desirable.
Although the advice of technical experts has
not been unanimous, we feel that the report of
the Board of Water Commissioners of .last year
covered the salient features of the issue so well,
that we offer selections from it for further con-
sideration.
The report was issued at the conclusion of. a
meeting which was called for the purpose of "dis-
cussing the water problem of the City with the
idea in mind of arriving at the logical solution
of the water question for all time. "Upon discussion
of the matter, it appeared to be the unanimous
opinion of all those present that a..softening and
filtration plant with the Huron River as the source
of supply was the solution of the problem.
The essential points of the report, concisely sum-
marized, are as follows:
"1. The continued use of the existing sources
ri' Yrn 1nw rn...... r.ncrJn. nrrr. . .rn . n - ~i

Both the financial injury and the public criti-
cism could be eliminated by a properly treated
supply.,
"2. The correction of this condition through
the softening of well water solely leads to an
indeterminate expense of large proportions.
The initial investment required is likely to
amount to at least $500,000, with more to
follow as the water demand increases. There
would seem to be no possibility, either now or
in the early future, of securing the necessary
funds to carry out a softened-well-water
project.
"3. The Huron River at the Barton Dam
offers the only known adequate and satisfac-.
tory source of supply which may be filtered and
softened at a reasonable and determinate cost,
estimates for this Board indicate: (a) That a
river project can be carried out, under existing
conditions, for a capital outlay of not to
exceed $335,000, including plants and mains
and, (b) That the increase in annual operating
costs to the Department, exclusive of Fixed
Charges, should not exceed $30,000; that there
is available from department funds $125,000,
and that, therefore, $210,000 additional would
be required. (c) That this additional burden
may be asumed by the department without any
increase in existing rates.
"4. The Montgomery and Barton Wells could
be utilized in connection with the proposed
plant, with no additional capital outlay in the
case of the Barton . . . but with an additional
investment in the case of the Montgomery
well of about $45,000. The added operating
costs would depend upon the amount of exist-
ing wells, but a summer use only of well water,
to improve temperatures could be carried out
without increasing rates.
"Recommendations:
"In view of the above your Board of Water
Commissioners unanimously recommend the
adoption at thi time of a plan to filter and
soften Huron River water, as the major source
of the City's supply, and for the following
reasons:
(a) It will afford a permanent and satisfac-
tory solution to the City's water problem and
at a reasonable and definite cost,
(b) The savings to the water consumers
would amount to the capital investment in not
over five years.
(c) The construction at this time of reduced
prices and unemployment is particularly de-
sirable , .
The motion was defeated in the Council, 12-1,
because of uncertain sentiments of the people, and
the matter has been dropped since.
Thus this very sensible analysis of our water
problem, along with about six others of the same
character, have been ignored despite our needs.
Dirge For
The Counci l:.. .
HE PROPOSAL for a dissolution of
the Undergraduate Council made
Thursday by the president of that body and gen-
erally assented to by other members of the organi-
zation comes as a natural result of the Council's
condition throughout the year. It is simply the
case of a very sick man dying. The death bed
struggles are made humiliatingly conspicuous by
the absence of mourners.
The truth is that student government at Mich-
igan doesn't exist. The Undergraduate Council
has no genuine power of its own. Every move that
it makes may be vetoed by higher administrative
bodies. This is true, too, of the Interfraternity
Council. It takes its orders from the Judiciary Com-
mittee. There is an attempt to pretend, of course,
that the University has student government, and
that this government is a wise and beautiful thing,
for it is the voice of the people, which, in turn, is
the voice of God. But, as long as the authority does
not really rest with the student representatives,
they cannot do a thing. They can just talk, aim-
lessly, futilely, like little children endeavoring des-
perately to convince themselves of their own
importance. They are simply puppets. They are
allowed to play parliament as long as they don't
hurt anyone.
The members of the Undergraduate Council were
rather aware of this situation all year. That was
the reason why so few of them appeared at meet-
ings. After all, as long as a meeting is meaning-
less, why go? The Council members have at last
given up the ghost. There is no longer need to

pretend that the Council is a student self-govern-
ment body. Now that the members are about to pick
up their packages and depart (amid a complete
silence), the University can look forward, quite
possibly, to a year in which the entire farce of
student government will happily be forgotten.
Art Reviews

Musical Events
TOD4Y'S CONCERTS
Afternoon
Frederick Stock directing
Beethoven Coriolanus Overture
Beethoven 9th Symphony
Strauss "Ein Heldenleben"
Evening
Ileger, "A Song of Peace," an oratorio
for Soli and Chorus, Earl V. Moore,
directing
FRIDAY AFTERNOON CONCERT
In Review
YOUTH HAS BEEN SERVED. There was sixteen
year old Guila Bustabo, strong, sure violinist,
there was the Children's Chorus, highly-trained,
and there was the Stanley Chorus, a very young
organization, under the leadership of Margaret
Martindale, senior in the School of Music. Bustabo,
with her whizzing technique, and the young peo-
ple's chorus, with their secure training, were ex-
pected to give a good performance. Bustabo's was
fortunately more than technique. Miss Martindale
had the rare chance of conducting the principals
of the orchestra.
"In all fairness to Miss Martindale, it should
have been decided to let her direct the chorus, for
she had. done all the work and done it well," said
Eric DeLamarter yesterday afternoon, "but, the
decision,. was based on more than that, for young
Miss Martindale has leadership, plus a scholar-
ship that every conductor must have who satisfies
a musician. She has a clear beat, and, this after-
noon had full command of every situation."
DeLamarter's conducting of the Bach Concerto,
and the merry little spring symphony of Milhaud
with a chamber orchestra, makes apparent the
musicianship that is his.
FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT
In Review
THUS FAR, the Festival has had no concert
equal to the thoroughly drilled performance
that was given last night. The Brahms Fourth
Symphony held all the elements that went into
the other sections of the program. Stock was in a
beneficent mood; his reading endowed the sym-
phony with drama in the first movement, with
song in the second, with puckish humour in the
third, and masculinity in the fourth, with its res-
onant brasses. Nouns indicate nothing, perhaps, for
the spirit, the power and the glory of the Brahms
was new. There was a richness and emotional
texture in the sound that cannot be transmitted to
those who were not there. The opening brilliance
of the Moussorgsky "Night on a Bare Mountain,"
moreover, gave a precedence to the enthusiastic
performance that went on throughout the evening.
Expecting to hear something ghoulish, or grotesque,
I heard a descriptive piece concerning spirits of
darkness that a Berlioz would have scorned. The
"Sailor's Dance," jovial and high spirited, Stock
repeated at a "slower tempo, ladies and gentle-
men" -in one section.
"Voi che sapete" won complete submission to
Lucrezia Bori. She sang it as Mozart, with all
grace and delicacy. With an entirely different kind
of voice than Ponselle's, with different tempera-
ment, Bori fits the concert stage perfectly. She is
(studiedly) artless, creating ,for us finesse and
beauty. Her manner with her student admirers, her
inclusion of Mrs. Rhead in her applause, her fem-
ininity, add to her fascination as one of the fine
singers of the world. Her accompaniment by the
orchestra, guided by Stock, enhanced her lovely
voice. We would like to know what she said to
Stock when she shook his hands so happily.
With a packed house, with such a performance,
there is every reason to be thankful that the Fes-
tival has continued in spite of obstacles.
-Sally Place.

MAY

FESTIVAL

11,

MAY 12

Cla'ssifiedl
Aids Get
Resutlts

T

Artists

LUCREZIA BQRI.....Soprano
ROSA PONSELLE . .. .Soprano
JEANN.ETTE VREELAND...
............... . Soprano
COE GLADE.......Contralto
PAUL ALTHOUSE .....Tenor
ARTHUR HACKETT. . Tenor

THEODORE WEBB.. Baritone
CHASE BAROMEO...... Bass
GUILA BUSTABO... .Violinist
MISCHA LEVITZKI.. .Pianist
MABEL ROSS RHEAD.....
. Accompanist
PALMER C RISTIAN Organist

Now=

THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION....................30 Voices
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA............ 70 Players
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS..............400 Voices
THE STANLEY CHORUS............................... Women
ChoralWorks
SONG OF PEACE, (Ein Friedenslied) ...............Robert Heger
NINTH SYMPHONY ................................Beethoven
THE SEASONS ..................... ..............,Haydn
THE UGLY DUCKLING............................English
BY THE RUINS OF BABYLON............. .......Loeffler
conductors
EARL V. MOORE .......................... ... Musical Director
FREDERICK STOCK.... ..............Orchestra Conductor
ERIC DeLAMARTER ........................Associate Conductor
JUVA HIGBEE ................... . .. Young People's Conductor

Get O'ur
ESTIMATE
On Your
Mov ing
Why do without the best as
long as it costs no more? It
is a science to move safely.
speedily, and for a reasona-
ble price. And your furnish-
ings, whether you move one
mile or a thousand, are re-
liably insured.

PROGRAMS
V. SATURDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano THEODORE WEBB,:Bass
COE GLADE, Contralto UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
ARTHUR HACKETT, Tenor CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Overture to "Cariolanus, Op. 62 .........................Beethoven
Symphony No. 9, in D minor, Op. 125......................Beethoven
MISS VREELAND, MISS GLADE, MR. HACKETT, AND MR .WEB
UNIVERSITY CHORAL 'UNION

4

i

Elsifor
Carta ge Co.
117 North First St.
PHONE 4297
(Nights, 2-3811)

Tone Poem, "Ein Heldenieben," Op. 40 ................-....Strauss
The Hero
The Hero's Adversaries
The Hero's Companion
The Hero's Battlefield
The Hero's Mission of Peace
The Hero's Escape from the World - Conclusion :.
VI. SATURDAY EVENING, 8:15
JEANNETTE VREELAND Soprano CHASE BAROMEO, Bass
COE GLADE, Contralto PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist
PAUL ALTHOUSE, Tenor UNIVERSITY CkIORAL UNION
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, EARL V. MOORE, Conductor
A Song of Peace ("Ein Friedenslied")........................Heger
American Premiere
Five Songs divided into parts for Soli, Chortis, Orchestra, and Organ
The English Version arranged from Holy Writ by Earl V. Moore
TICKET PRICES
Single.Concert Tickets, $100, $1.50, $2.00 on sale at School of Music

,,

SOULPTURE EXHIBIT AT LEAGUE
THE EXHIBITION of twenty-four subjects in
plaster and the original clay by Professor
Auard Fairbanks and his pupils is testimony of
their skill in the use of that medium. The exhibi-
tion is showing on the second floor of the Mich-
igan League.
Of the three done .by Professor Fairbanks him-
self, the most outstanding is "Dawn and Morn-
ing Glories." Dawn as a majestic goddess has a
halo of gold over her head, three human figures
and morning glories at her feet.- Lovely hues of
blue, red and blue violets, and pale yellow express
dawn. The tall slender figure is inspiringly effec-
tive.
Another beautiful figure is a bronze-finished
model of "Agriculture": a man of rugged strength
and masculine beauty in a determined pose hold-
isg some earth in his hand.
There is a group of small pixie-like creatures
which are truly decorative; and a group of larger
figures portraying. "Satyr," "Sacrifice," "Study,"
"Improvement." The curves of the body laudably
depict the mood expressed in the title.
Some unusually fine things of Helen V. Bailey's
are on exhibit.

Collegiate Observer
By BUD BERNARD
What a difference a few thousand miles make
even in this evil called an examination. But an
evil can be lessened, and here's how it's done over
at Oxford. First, all the students who are taking
the examination light their pipes and sit around
discussing the subject for about three-quarters of
an hour. Then they start to write, but if one hap-
pens to get stuck, and Rhodes Scholars get stuck
now and then you know, he asks his neighbor who
probably knows something the inquirer doesn't. All
that is expected merely because the professors at
that distinguished place of learning don't expect
one to write on a subject they know nothing about.
Simple isn't it?
* , * *
Here is an excerpt from a freshman's essay
at Georgia Tech on "Co-eds": "I'm awfully
glad there are no co-eds at Georgia Tech be-
cause they are so dangerous when wild, and
they are tantalizing when they are not wild."
Most co-eds are wild. They have big brown
eyes like a cow or some other color. In fact they
are beautiful all over usually as far as I know.
They do not wear many clothes, and I think
that would keep boys from studying if they
walked by too much. They must be mean or
else they do not know they have this effect on
the boys."
mechanical and resemble architectural drawings.
A mural, "Sketch for Michigan Industrial," by
Bennett, is an accurate representation of, fac-
tory life, yet color and pattern subserve a common
purpose.
Professor Jean Paul Slusser of the College of
Architecture has two splendid studies exhibited,
"Composition" and "Old Houses." Professor Slus-
ser's technique shows a thorough knowledge of his
medium. His style is free, bold, and totally mas-
culine.
A wealth of rich color is used in "Flowers in a
Blue Vase" by Williams. A lovely soft blue vase
contains a bunch of most realistic tulips and

Religious Activities

First Methodist.
Episcop al Church
A COMMUNITY CATHEDRAL
State and Washington
Ministers
Frederick B. Fisher
Peter F.' Stair
10:45 -- Special Mother's Day Service.
"Motherhood Plus"
Sermon by Dr. Fisher
No evening service.
STALKER HALL
For University Students
6:00 - Student Devotional Service

H illel Foundation
Corner East University and Oaldand
Dr Bernard Heller. Director
11:15 A.M.,-
"Our Mothers"
-addrcsses by Minna Giffin ,and
Dena Sudow. The services will be
entirely in charge of women stu-
dents.
4:00 P.M. - Meeting of the class in
Jewish Ethics led by Mr. ltirsih
Hoodkins.
7:15 P.M. - Class in Dramatic Mo-
ments in Jewish History, led by
Rabbi Bernard Heller.
8:15 P.M. - Open house.

Zion Lutheran
Church
Washington St. at Fifth Ave:-
E. C. Stelihorn, Pastor
9:00 A.M. --Bible School- Topic:
"Christionity and
pariotism"
10:30 A.M.---A pre-confirniation serv-
ice,
4:30 P.M.--The student club will
leave the parish hall for an out-
door meeting.

ii _

St. Pauil's Lutheran
(Missouri Synod)
West Liberty and Third Sts.
May 13, 1934
9:30 A.M. - Divine service in Ger-
man. Sermon -
"The Wonderful Ascension

DO NOT
N EGLECT
YOUR
R I LI11fl,

The Fellowship of
Liberal Religion
(Unitarian)
State and Huron Streets

11

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