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May 12, 1934 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'lay By Play

Account Of 13

To

1

Victory Over Ohio

Sta

Walks, Errors,

Q

Misses No-Hit Game In Ninth Inning

9 Hits Bring 13
Michian Runs
Buckeye Batters Subdued
By Smart Pitching And
Great Control

First Inning
Ohio Stte - Prosenjak
out. Lewis struck out. Clowson
out.

struck
struck

I

Michigan - Artz struck out. Oliver
grounded out. Petoskey hit a homer
over center fielder's head. Paulson
grounded out.
Second Inning
Ohio State - McAfee struck out.
Vidis struck out. Moser struck out.
Michigan - Wistert tripled to right
field, Regeczi struck out. Ratterman
flied out to to centerfield, Wstert
scoring after the catch. Chapman
flied to Lewis.
Third Inning
Ohio State -Dolch struck out.
King struck out. Ulrich struck out.
Michigan -Lerner grounded out.
Artz singled to left. Oliver fored Artz.
Petoskey walked. Paulson forced
Oliver.
Fourth Inning
Ohio State - Prosenjak grounded
out. Lewis lined to Petoskey. Clowson
flied to Regeezi.
Michigan - Wistert walked. Re-
geezi singled to right field sending
Wistert to second. Ratterman's fly
was dropped by Dolch, filling the
bases. Chapman flied to Vidis, Wistert
scoring after the catch. Clowson
juggled Lerner's grounder filling the
bascs. Regeczi scored on a wild pitch,
Itatterman and Lerner advancing a
base. Artz hit out, Ratterman scoring.
Oliver grounded out.
Fifth Inning
Ohio State - McAfee struck out.
Vidis struck out. Moser struck out.
Michigan -- Petoskey singled to
center field. Paulson singled to left,
Petoskey going to third and Paulson
taking second on a fielder's choice.
Blue replaced Ulrich for Ohio State.
Regeczi struck out. Ratterman hit to
King, forcing Wistert at second. Clow-
son's throw to McAfee went wild, Pe-
toqkey and Paulson scoring. Ratter-
man was safe at first and went to
third on a passed ball. Chapman hit
a homer over left fielder's head. Ler-.
nr struck out.
Sixth Inning
Ohio State - Long batted for Dolch
and struck out. King bunted to Wis-
tert and was safe on Whitey's wild
throw. Blue- struck out, King stealing
second. Prosenjak flied out to Regeczi.
Michigan- Artz flied to Vidis.
Oliver grounded out. Petoskey walked,
stole second, and went to third on a
passed ball.Paulson was sae on Lewis'
bad throw to McAfee, Petoskey scor-
ing. Paulson stole second but was
picked off by Blue a play later.
Seventh Inning
Ohio State - Lewis struck but.
Clowson bunted out. McAfee ground-
ed out,
Michigan - Wistert flied to Lewis.
Regeczi walked. Ratterman singled
to right, Regeczi going to third.
Chapman flied -to Vidis, Regezi
scoring after the catch. Ratterman
stole second and took third on a
paed ball. Lerner walked and took
second. Artz singled to left scoring
Riatterian and Lerner. Artz stole sec-.
ond. Oliver 'fouled out.
Eighth Inning
Obio State -Vidis bunted out.
Reilly pinch-batted for Moser and
grounded out. Long walked. King
struck out.
Michigan - Petoskey struck out.
Paulson walked and went to second
on a passed ball. Wistert walked. Re-
geczi popped out, but the catcher
dropped the ball and he reached first,
Wistert and Paulson advancing a
base. Oliver flied to King.
Ninth Inning
Ohio State - Blue was hit by a
pitched ball and on the next play
went down to second. Prosenjak flied
to Regeczi. Blue went to thii'd on a
passed ball. Lewis popped to Wistqrt
Clowson singled to left scoring Blue.
McAfee grounded out.
BOX SCORE
01110 STATE

Michigan Man, , , .

AS ONE GROWN from that class
of American youngsters that
haunts the vacant lots and plays a
variety of baseball between the bill-
board over in the corner and the ditch
at one end, I desire today to pay
tribute to a man who influenced pro-
foundly my years between nine and
thirteen,
There are "greats" and "near-
greats" in professional baseball, whose
example is daily set before a huge
number of youngsters who accompany
Dad to the ball park on the after-
noons off . . . or who belong to the
"knot-hole gang." I wonder if Cobb,.
Speaker, Ruth and company, or their
younger counterparts realize just how
much influence they have on the boy
in short pants who reads books on
how to pitch, and exults to the depths
of his being at the first pitched ball
that looks even a trifle crooked?
My particular idol was George Sis-
ter, who played a fine game at first
base for the St. Louis Browns during
the earlier twenties; George Sisler, the
Michigan man, who used to pitch for
the Maize and Blue. I can still re-
member wondering vaguely just where
Ann Arbor was after having received
that answer as the location of the
University of Michigan.
(QISLER WILL.ALWAYS be a great
ball players to me, no matter how
he stands in the Valhalla established
by experts. When there were two out,

a man on second, and the Brown
needed a run badly, George would step
up to the plate and hit one out quite
consistently. He was a timely batter.
There was another thing about Sis-
ter. I never saw him question an um-
pirc's decision. I can still remember
him coming up out of the dust at
first base, and grinning at the blue-
clad arbiter who was ruling him out
(Ie developed the technique of slid-
ing into first base). From this, I de-
veloped the axiom: "Michigan mier
don't argue with the umpire. They arc
good sports.,
This hero-worship continued up to
the year when Sisler's great tragedy
developed. In the prime of his career
he was taken with an attack of sinus
which seriously and permanently af-
fected his eyes. Despite several opera-
tiins, Sisler never recovered his bat-
ting eye and ultimately left the game
But no matter what they say about
his record, no matter what players
I'll ee in the future George Sisler
wil lalways be tIhe greatest ball player
that ever lived, to me.
BA SEBALL
The Detroit Tigers batted their
way back into the winning column
again by pounding out 14 hits to de-
feat Philadelphia, 10 to 5.
American League
Cleveland 6, Boston 5 (11 inn-
ings)
St. Louis 4, Washington 3 (10 inn-
ings)
New York 7, Chicago 6 (14 inn-
ings)
National League
Pittsburgh 6, Philadelphia 4 (10
innings)
Boston 8, Cincinnati 5
Brooklyn 13, Chicago 1
St. Louis 3, New York 2 (10 inn-
ings)

Big "Whitey" Wistert lost a no-hit game Tommy Bridges fashion
yesterday in the game between Ohio and Michigan at Ferry Field when,
with two down in the ninth, Clowson of the Buckeyes hit a hard single
between short and third. Wistert was in excellent form, fanning the first
nine men tot'ace him and amassing a total of 10 strikeouts over the nine-
inning stretch. B0sides that he hit a triple.
PLAY & BY-PLAY
--By AvI, NiE W MAN-

Linksmen Take
Fourth Victory
At Ohio State
Captain Dayton Shots 67
To Tic Course Record;
Koesis Gets 69
COLUMBUS, May 11.- (Special)
-Michigan's Big Ten championship
golf team rolled up its fourth straight
dual meet win of the season over
Ohio State today, winning 21% to 22.
Captain Eddie Dayton and Chuck
Kocsis again led the Wolverine scor-
ing, with Dayton blasting out a sizz-
ling round of 67 in the morning four-
somes, to tie the Arlington Course
record.
Kocsis shot two. consistent sub-par
rounds of 69 and 70 while Woody Mal-
loy, playing at number three for the
Wolverines carded two rounds of 73,
one over par.
The Buckeyes gained but one point
in the singles when Dudley halved a
nine with Milt Schloss, the Michigan
alternate, in their morning singles
round, and Cal Markham dropped
one-half point to Tracewell in their
singles match.
In the morning foursomes Captain
Dayton and Kocsis downed Garver,
Ohio State captain and his partner,
Lovebury, 2 to 1, while Malloy and
Markham defeated Coe pnd Trace-
well, 2%/ to '/.
The Summaries
Foursomes:
Kocsis and Dayton (M) Oef. Garver
and Lovebury, 2 to 1. Malloy and
Markham (M) def. Coe and Trace-
well, 22 to 1/2.
Singles:
Dayton (M) def. Co, 3 to 0. Mal-
ly (M) def. Lovebury, 3 to 0. Mark-
ham (M) def. Tracewell, 22 to %/2.
(M)clef. Dudley, 2V,2 to / (morning),
Kocsis (M) def. Garver, 3 to o. Schloss
3 to 0 (afternoon).
Wolverine Netters
At Columbus Today
Four Michigan netters left with
Coach Johnny Johnstone yesterday
afternoon for Columbus, Ohio, where
they hope to win an easy m&tch from
the Buckeye tennis team today.
Michigan should win handily from
Ohio State for the following reasons.
Michigan State during a recent tour
of Ohio colleges defeated the Buck-
eyes by the submersive score of 9 to
0. Michigan State is of approxi-
mately the same ability as Michigan,
because they downed the Wolverines
only by coming out on the odd end of
a 5 to 4 score. And as further proof
the Spartans crushed Oberlin College
8 to 1, while Michigan defeated the
same team, 9 to 0.
The four players who will repre-
sent Michigan at Columbus are Dan
Kean, Sam Siegel, Joe Appelt, and
Howard Kahn, who will appear in
that order of ranking. The doubles
combinations will be Kean and Kahn,
Siegel and Appelt.

By ART SETTLEl
It looks like Michigan is a very
good home team. The Wolverines, in1
four home games to date, defeated
Michigan State, Illinois, Michigan
Normal, and trounced the Buckeyes
yesterday, 13 to 1.
* * *
Wistert seems to be headed for the
big leagues. He pitched brilliant ball
to defeat Illinois, last Saturday, limit-'
ing the Illini to one run and three
hits. Yesterday he hurled what was
undoubtedly the best game of ball'
ever pitched on Ferry Field. Coach
Ray Fisher predicted last year that
Wistert would be a great college
hurler, and "Whitey" is bearing out
his faith.
Although Michigan piled up an
early lead, every fan in the park wait-
edl until the last man was out. They
wanted to see Wistert pitch a no-run,
no-hit game, and they would have
seen it, if Clowson hadn't singled to
left with two out in the ninth. Some
spectators may think harshly of Clow-
son, but he was a real ball player
and did the correct thing in trying to
hit. Wistert threw him a fast ball
around the knees, which was a bit oo
near the middle, and Clowson lined
the ball between short and third.
Wistert's performance was so spec-
tacular that the one hit detracted

little from the credit due him. He
struck out 16 batters, more than any
Michigan pitcher ever achieved be-
fore. He fanned the first nine men to
face him which is something in the
way of a college record.
* * *
The second game of the series will
start this afternoon at 2:30 p.m. Art
Patchin will start for the Wolverines,
and Williams will hurl for Ohio State.
Both pitchers were driven from the
mound early in the games, in the
series at Columbus.

Sidelights On Michigan Nine's
Brilliant Win Over Ohio State

American Golfers
Win In Foursomi
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland, May
- (/P) - Uncle Sam's young and c
Walker Cup men twisted the Brit
Lion's tail properly today in the ope
ing foursome skirmish, winning th
out of four matches and simplifyi
the task of keeping the internatior
trophy on American shores for a
other two years.
All Capt. Francis Ouimet's golf
ambassadors need tomorrow is
even break in the eight singles mate
es to clinch victory for the eigh
time since the biennial series star
in 1922.

SENIORS!
Call For
Your Canes
Today!
at
BURR PATTERSON
AUL D & OMPANY
Oldest Manufacturing
Fraternity Jewelers
in America
Dial 8837 Frank Okes, Mgr.
603 Church Street

FRIDAY & SATURDAY
9 A.M, era l A.M.

OPEN DAILY
9 A.M. to 12 P.M.

RENT ONE OF THESE BEAUTIFUL
OLD TOWN CANOES
at Sounder's Canoe Livery, and paddle
up the peaceful Huron River, enjoying
Ann Arbor's most healthful recreation.
Hoiron River at the foot of Cedar Street
Phone 9313

Three-base hits - Wistert.

Hlomel

runs - Petoskey, Chapman. Stolen
bases -Petoskey, Artz, Ratterman,
Lerner, King. Left on bases - Ohio
State 3, Michigan 5. Bases on balls:
Off Wistert 1, off Ulrich 3, off Blue
5. Struck out-by Wistert 16, by Ul-
rich 2, by Blue 3. Hits - off Ulrich
6 in 4 innings, off Blue 3 in 5 innings.
Wild pitch - Ulrich. Hit by pitcher
- by Wistert (Blue). Passed balls-
Chapman, Moser 2, Reilly. Time: 1
hour, 55 minutes.

IIIIIRI_ M1_'INMI_1111_11"1- 11 N I 1 ,11

I- OMCCMING and

i

c

wek

ELECTRIC
WASHER

to O ) rate an

MAY

FETt'IVAL

WEEK

at

*'S

BOOKSTOREFS

O YOU REALIZE how muCh labor
- you are saved in your home by your
electric appliances? Your electric washer,
for example: Doing quickly in an hour
or two what used to require an entire day
of back-breaking work-and doing it at
a total cost of TWO CENTS: Can you
think of any other service that gives you
more for your money?
Or your electric v a c uu m cleaner.
Whisking away dust and dirt smoothly
and efficiently at a cost of one Cent an
hour. And your electric clock, keeping
time as faithfully as the finest watch-
never needing winding or attention-for
a fifth of a cent a day.
Go down the list of all your electric
appliances: You will find their daily
operating cost measured in pennies or
fractions of a penny. Where else can you
get such tireless servants so ridiculously
low?

,_1

Pro
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Me/~
Vida
Mos
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Kiw
(Illi

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senljak, rf......4 0
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We extend a cordial invitation to Homecoming and Festival Guests and
sincerely hope that on your tour of the campus and the city, that you
will visit
MICH IGAN'S BEST BOOKSTOR E
Our stores abound in books which cannot fail to be of interest especially
at this time,. and include MUSICAL LITERATURE, MUSICAL IN-

TERPRETATION, ANALYSIS, BIOGRAPHY,
HISTORY, CRITICISM, ETC., ETC.

DICTIONARIES,

A Complete Line of Michigan Souvenirs: MICHIGAN VIEWS, CAL-
ENDARS, PLACQUES, BOOK-ENDS, JEWELRY, BANNERS,
PENNANTS, ETC., ETC.

MICHIGAN
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Oliver, 3b .......5 0
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