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May 09, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

YAN DAILY

. R1

I

-N

vil

meetings for the consideration of the movement
both pro and con by recognized authorities.
Had the attitude of those students who went to
Detroit been really an interest in the workers and
their cause, instead of a search for publicity, it
seems likely that they would have attended the
mass meeting held that night and presented the
student attitude in a speech at that time.
The Daily did not attempt to condone the un-
necessary roughness of the police in dealing with
these students, but it must be admitted that there
were extenuating circumstances as far as the police
were concerned. They were under orders to prevent
any demonstration at Grand Circus Park and when
the crowd rolled up with its crowd of singing, yell-
ing, students they directed it away from the park
several times, with ordinary traffic direction ges-
tures, and each time it returned. They then de-
cided that they would have to chase them away
for good. They did, although unquestionably with
altogether too much vigor.
Finally, the remarks concerning Mr. Cheyfitz in
The Daily editorial have been criticized. May we
simply refer those who resent The Daily's stand on
Mr. Cheyfitz to the stories which have appeared in
The Daily in the last two years concerning him.

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Ross Levin, Willy Tomlinson, Dean Asselin, Lyman
Bittman, John Park, Don Hutton, Allen Ulpson, Richard
Harden brook, Gordon Cohn.

Musical Events
OPENING CONCERT
OF FESTIVAL
Rosa Ponselle, soloist
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Frederick Stock, conductor
Prelude and Fugue (St. Anne's)
E-flat Major............Bach-Stock
Aria, "Bel Raggio Lusinghier"
(Semiramide) .................. Rossini
"La Mer"'..........................Debussy
Arias:
"Adio del Passata" (La Traviata) ...Verdi*
"Chanson Boheme" (Carmen) ......Bizet
Rapsodie Espagnole ..................Ravel
Freschi Luoghi Prati Aulenti ........ Donaudy
Marietta's Lied (Die Tote Stadt) .... Korngold
Respetto......................Wolf-Ferrari
Si Tu Le Voulais ............Tosti
My Lover He Comes on a Ski . Clough-Leighter
ROSA PONSELLE with her magic name, her
glamorous personality, is the soloist who will
star dn the opening Festival program, this evening.
That the schedule of this season's presentation
with seven famous singers, one pianist, one violin-
ist, the Choral Union, the Young People's Chorus
and the Stanley Chorus, is devoted in the main to
singing is no drawback for the selections of works
has been carefully planned for variety and interest;
with the symphonic contributions, this season holds
color and beauty for all those who will but listen.
Dr. Stock will conduct the orchestra in its units
on the program tonight: Bach Fugue, (Stock
transcription), "La Mer" by Debussy, and Ravel's
"Rapsodie Espagnole." The sea-piece shows De-
bussy in the medium where he has excelled and
where he has been influential, in orchestration. Ra-
vel, interested in rhythm, has based his Rapsodie
upon Spanish dance forms. The two works contain
individual qualities that enable them to,be put on
the same program, although their composers names
are frequently linked as being synonymous.
Ponselle will sing arias that are favorite with
her, and that are manna to her audiences. The
Rossini aria from Semiramide she sang here two
years ago. She has triumphed time and again in
Carmen, and in La Traviata, an aria from each of
which she is singing. Her last group bespeaks
grace, charm, color, and dash that are Ponsellian.
-Sally Place.

Screen Reflections
The rating of pict ures is in accord wih the followng;
Above is the new form of rating motion pictures
in this column, which goes into effect beginning
today. It had been found advisable to change from
the old schedule of rating, the use of four, three,
two, one and no stars, because it is felt that the
reader will receive a clearer and more definite idea
of the value of the pictures reviewed. A pictures will
be only the very best, B will indicate pictures having
worthy entertainment value, C's will signify aver-
age, mildly entertaining pictures, D pictures should
be stayed away from unless boredom is very acute,
and an E picture will be considered absolutely
worthless. -.C.
A AT THE MAJESTIC
"Man Of Two Worlds"
Aigo.................Francis Lederer
Joan....................Elissa Landi
Sir Basil............Henry Stephenson
Michael.........J. Farrel MacDonald
Directed by"...........J. Walter Ruben
The crowning indignity of American commercial
methods in the cinema field is exemplified by the
way a major circuit books films into one of its
theatres. Not the fault of the local managers, many
films are forced to play for seven days, while others
are not bothered about nor publicized, and given a
minimum run of two days. And it is usually the
much superior picture that gets the rotten break.
"Man Of Two Worlds" deserves to run for at least
an entire week, instead of getting a measly two
day's exhibition. It has almost everything a really
good film should have. In addition to being swell
entertainment, it is art with a capital A.
A group of scientists on an expedition into the
Arctic to catch polar animals for the sake of
science, engage a young man, Aigo, the greatest
hunter of the colony. Aigo's amazing intelligence
and unfailing good humor make him a favorite
among the company of explorers. Aigo constructs
for his worship an idealist belief in a picture of the
expedition leader's daughter and persuades the
Englishmen to take him to England so that he
may see the ideal in the flesh. They decide to grant
him this favor, but from purely scientific motives.
Aigo's problem of adjustment to a hypocritical
civilization forms the basis of this film. This prob-
lem is handled for once intelligently. It is not senti-
mentalized, nor is it romanticized in the stereo-
typed way. Director Ruben, a newcomer in the field,
has lent a masterly touch to the production of this
film and has turned out a product he can well be
proud of.
The acting of Francis Lederer is a welcome relief
from the sophisticated eyebrow-lifting called act-
ing. His interpretation of the character of Aigo is
refreshingly sincere. The movies have gained an-
other good actor. Here's hoping they don't make
a stereotyped puppet out of him. The film's photog-
raphy is beautiful. Its idea is an excellent one.
The acting of everyone is free from flippancy. And
the final effect is one of harmonious mating of true
cinematic material with the full realization of the
medium's possibilities. -J.C.S.
A CORRECTION
In the review of "Bottoms Up" which appeared
in this column yesterday, the character "Smoothy"
was erroneously stated to have been played by Lee
Tracy. It should have been Spencer Tracy.
-C.B.C.
ADVANCE NOTICE
All-Girl Show starts at the Michigan Tomorrow
The Michigan is again presenting a stage show in
conjunction with a full-length feature, "The Poor
Rich." "Not a Man in a Stage Full" is the slogan
used by Boyle Woolfolk's All-Girl Review in ad-
vertising itself. Thirty-five girls are in this prom-
ising stage attraction, which consists of the well-
known Boston Brunette's Orchestra, the twelve
Reggie Voorheees Girls, the famous Four Albee
Sisters, Dell O'Dell, comedienne, Elaine Manzi,
dancer and Marie Paris, the mistress of ceremonies.
The show runs for three days, starting Thursday.

he shows up, accompanied by white mice; she goes
back into her trance. Her brother, Damon Wells,
great actor (Martin Burton) is quite enraged at
the reappearance of this dastardly incubus, and
disappears to Philadelphia. About this time a
wealthy foreigner makes his appearance, desiring
to buy Jessica's interest in the show; Vance dickers
with him; dark doings follow, ending in a really
neat murder. There is also a middle-aged producer,
a swell guy who loves Jessica; his name is Ben
West (Phillip Dakin).
Of course, it has often been pointed out that
there is no such thing as a new plot, and no
one can therefore blame a plot for being aged.
Nevertheless, when one hits on a plot so conspicu-
ously specialized as that of the return of a male-
volent hypnotist, it is time to lay the dust on the
script by careful application of dramatic Tarvia;
else the business is sure to be recognized for what
it is - bewhiskered nonsense. Messrs. Woolcott and
Kaufman borrowed heavily from "The Lady from
the Sea," but these gentlemen, wise as they are at
sophisticated comedy, do not have Ibsen's tech-
nique when it comes to serious drama. The result
is a pretty weak piece of writing, which requires an
outstandingly fine production and unusually good
acting to make convincing.
There was nothing unusually good about the De
Forest production: three people are excellent, two
were good, and the rest were mediocre or poor. Ap-
parently no time had been spent on rehearsal:
business was uncertain; lines were uncertain; cad-
ences were uncertain; timing was completely lack-
ing. The show moved on and on -the actors, it
must be admitted, may have been disconcerted by
a criminally small house, but most of the difficulty
was inherent in lack of talent or lack of training.
Excellency was omnipresent in Mr. Burton, as the

li_.. ,_ .Ii

MAY'

LUCREZIA BORI .....,Soprano
ROSA PONSELLE .... Soprano
JEANNETTE VREELAND...
.Soprano
COE GLADE ........ Contralto
PAUL ALTHOUSE ...... Tenor
ARTHUR H ACKETT ... Tenor

THEODORE WEBB.. Baritone
CHASE BAROMEO...... Bass
GUILA BUSTABO.....Violinist
MISCHA LEVITZKI. .. Pianist
MABEL ROSS RHEAD......
.. Accompanist
PALMER CHRISTIAN Organist

FETIAL
MAY 9, 10, 11, 12
Artists

NIGHT EDITOR: JOHN C. HEALEY
M ay D ay Demonstrators
Clearly In Wrong .. .
T HERE HAS BEEN a great deal of
criticism on the part of some groups
on the campus of The Daily editorial of Thursday,
May 3, criticizing the action of the group which
went to Detroit to participate in the May Day
activities.
The position taken by that editorial was that
the students who took part in the expedition, what-
ever their motives, were to be censured and that
they probably got what was coming to them.
Most of the protests of the campus radicals have
centered around the abridgement of the right of
free speech and free assemblage. It seems that
those who are making such a protest over these
points do not realize that on May Day 14 parks and
other public places had been set aside by the De-
troit Commissioner of Police for anyone who
wanted to meet peaceably and conduct a meeting.
Grand Circus Park, where the truckload had its
difficulties, being in the middle of the downtown
business section, was one of the few places in the
city where a gathering was prohibited. The fact
that the police would not allow the students to
demonstrate at one park when 14 others had been
designated as permissible can hardly be called an
abridgement of the right of free speech.
Those students who have since claimed that their
participation in the ride was purely for reasons of
a sociological study of the May Day activities cer-
tainly deserve criticism. A sociological study of the
situation implies a disinterested, objective attitude.
One would expect a sociology student to stand
around on the edge and take notes, and if he
were a true student of sociology rather than of
the subject under discussion, he would take no
active part in the activities. Contrast this with the
attitude of those in the truck with banners on the
side singing the "Internationale." Certainly this
method of attending the meeting could hardly be
called judicial disinterestedness. The conclusion
is that either these .students were astonishingly
ignorant of the conditions under which the trip
was to be made and of the state of affairs in
Detroit, or that they were not truly sociology stu-
dents, neither conclusion very complimentary.
There were some few students on the truck who
have frankly admitted that their purpose was the
forwarding of Communism and Socialism. Certain-
ly anyone who has spent two or three years in a
university should be beyond the mob stage of agi-
tation. With the background which should have
been accumulated in the course of a college edu-
cation the proponent of any political faction should
be able to take an unbiased and unprejudiced view
of 't n , n ...r m vf T# , z+,. + .1

ThT TETheatre
AT THE LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
DANCE PROGRAM - A Review
By JOHN W. PRITCHARD
THE JOINT RECITAL last night of Play Pro-
duction and Dance Club grew out of the great
amount of acclaim that was given a similar pro-
gram last semester. The first one was, however,
chiefly a demonstration - an attempt to give a
resume of the entire dance curriculum, and to show
how the body co-ordination necessary in dancing
was a great aid to acting poise and control. Last
night's program was not a demonstration; it was
truly a recital. Nothing was as elementary as the
early numbers in the previous demonstration;
all was well executed; it was an entertainment
program, and worthy of laudation as such.
To be especially noted were Wilckens "Study,"
the Gilbert and Sullivan "Cachucca" (repeated
from "The Gondoliers"), the Faure "Pavanne" (re-
peated from the earlier program), the "Political
Meeting," the Chopin "Circular Design" (a solo
by Collin Wilsey), the Tcherepnine "Parade," and
the DeFalla "Invocation to Fire." It is to be ob-
served that of these seven special citations, three
were worked out by the groups involved without
instruction. They all indicated excellent funda-
mental grasp of dance principles, and great success
on the part of Dance Club and Play Production in
inculcating rhythm and control into their students.
AT THE DETROIT WILSON
"THE DARK TOWER"- A Review
I AM BEGINNING to be worried about the De For-
est Famous Players. The worriment was all
begun Monday night, when I saw (along with about
300 other people, in a house with a capacity of
somewhere near 1,500) an untrained company
present a comedy-drama built about a situation
that was great stuff when Hendrik Ibsen wrote
"The Lady from the Sea," and later when a play
known by a title something like "The Strange Case
of Becky" made its appearance.
Knowing that "The Dark Tower" was written by
those master sophisticates, Alexander Woolcott
and George S. Kaufman, one would expect a play
that would rise well above the standard of medio-
crity. "The Dark Tower" has its moments; it has a

Organizations
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION.......... . . ......30 Voices
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA..........70 Players
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS..............400 Voices
THE STANLEY CHORUS...............................Women
Chornl1W orks
SONG OF PEACE (Ein Friedenslied) ..............Robert Heger
NINTH SYMPHONY .................. . . . . .........Beethoven
THE SEASONS .........................................Haydn
THE UGLY DUCKLING .......... . .....................English
BY THE RUINS OF BABYLON... . ... . .......... . ... ..Loefiler
Cndu ctors
EARL V. MOORE................................Musical Director
FREDERICK STOCK .....................Orchestra Conductor
ERIC DeLAMARTER ....................... Associate Conductor
JUVA JIG .BEE.................... . ..Young People's Conductor
PROGRAMS
I. WEDNESDAY EVENING, 8:15
ROSA PONSELLE, Soprano
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Prelude and Fugue ("St. Anne's") E-flat major..........Bach-Stock
Aria, "Bel Raggio Lusinghier," ("Semiramide")..............Rosslini
MISS PONSELLE
La Mer (The Sea)......................................Debussy
From Dawn to Noon at Sea
Gambols of the Waves
Dialogue Between the Wind and Sea
Arias, "Adio del Passato" (La Traviata").....................Verdi
"Chanson Boheme" ("Carmen")...........................Bizet
MISS PONSELLE
RapsodietEspagnole............................................Ravel
Bongs with Piano;
Freschi Luoghi Prati Aulenti....................Stefano Donaudy
Marietta's Lied from "Die Tote Stadt"..........Erich Korngold
Respetto............................... .......... E. Wolf-Ferrari
si Tu Le Voulais ...................................F. Paolo Tosti
My Lover lie Comes on a Ski .....................Clough-Leighter
ROSA PONSELLE
Mr. Stuart Ross at the Piano
11. THURSDAY EVENING, 8:15
TEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano MISCHA LEVITSKI, Pianist
PAUL ALTHOUSE, Tenor PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist
wHAsE BAROMEO, Bass UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
EARL V. MOORE and FREDERICK STOCK, Conductors
"The Seasons".................................................Haydn
An Oratorio for Soprano, Tenor, and Bass Soil.
Mixed Chorus, Orchestra, and Organ
MISS VREELAND, Messrs.,ALTHOUSE and BAROMEO and the
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
Concerto in G minor for Piano and Orchestlra, Op. 22 ,...Saint-Saens
Andante sostenuto
Allegro scherzando
Presto
III. FRIDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30
GUTLA BUSTABO. Violinist ERIC DE LAMARTER and
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS JUVA HIGBEE, Conductors
STANLEY CHORUS
Allegro from Concerta No. 2 in F major for Trumpet an
Strings ("Brandenberg")...................................Bach
Songs:
On Wings of Song..................................Mendessohn
Hedge Roses ......................................Schubert
Blue Danube Waltz...................................J. Strauss
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS
Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso for Violin and Orchestra,
Op. 28.............................................Saint-Saens
GUTLA BUSTABO
Cantata, "The Ugly Duckling"...........................English
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS
First Symphony ...........................................Milhaud
By the waters of Babylon. ....... ......................Loeffler
THE STANLEY CHORUS
Andante and Rondo-Allegro from "Symphony Espagnole"
for Violin and Orchestra, Op.21.................... .........La
MISS BUSTABO
IV. FRIDAY EVENING, 8:15
LUCREZIA BORI, Soprano
CHICAGO SYPMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Fantasle "A Night on a Bare Mountain" ..............Mousorgsky
Aria, "Voi che sapete"..................................-...Mozart
Symphony No. 4 in E minor. Op. 98 ...........................Brahms
Recitative and Aria of Lia ("L'Enfant Prodigue") ............Debussy
MISS BORI
V. SATURDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano THEODORE WEBB, Bass
COE GLADE, Contralto UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
ART'HUR HACKETT. Tenor CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Overture to "Cariolanus." Op. 62.........................Beethoven
Symphony No, 9, in D minor, Op. 125................Beethoven
MISS VREELAND, MISS GLADE, M. HCET NDM.WB
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
Tone Poem, "Ein Heldenleben," Op. 40 ........................Strauss
The Hero
The Hero's Adversaries
The Hero's Companion
The Hero's Battlefield
The Hero's Mission of Peace
The Hero's Escape front the World - Conclusion

VI. SATURDAY EVENING, 8:15
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano CHASE BAROMEO, Bass
COE GLADE, Contralto PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist
PAUL ALTHOUSE. Tenor UNIVERSITYCHORAL UNION

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