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May 09, 1934 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1934

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tennis

Team To Meet

Western State

Here

This

Afternoo:

Western State
Favored Over
Michigan Team
Johnstone To Send Kean
Against Leavin, Number
One Player
Western State's Varsity tennis team
comes to Ann Arbor today with the
intention, and it is one that is more
than likely to be carried out, of ad-
ministering a defeat to the Michigan
netters. The administering will take
place at 3 p.m. this afternoon at the
Ferry Field courts.
Tennis asa rule is avery polite
game, but the way Western State
plays it, it becomesna veryrude af-
fair. The Wolverines found this out
last Friday when they went to Kala-
mazoo for a friendly little practice
match with the Teachers previous to
taking on Northwestern Saturday at
Evanston, Ill. The Hilltoppers hand-
ed Michigan the worst defeat they
have experienced thus far this sea-
son, 5 to 2. And here the Teachers
are in Ann Arbor, ready to do it
again.
Coach Johnstone plans to use prac-
tically the same ranking against the
Hilltoppers that faced them at Kala-
mazoo. The only alteration is the
moving of Seymour Siegel from third
ranking to second and the dropping
of Joe Appelt consequently to third.
Johnstone is sticking by Dan Kean.
The plucky Negro find will continue
in the first ranking position despite
his two singles defeats last week at
Kalamazoo and Evanston. He stays
by virtue of extending his opponents
to three sets, says Johnstone. Kean
will probably meet Laevin.
The remainder of the Michigan
team will line up as follows: Howard
Kahn, Bill Bowles, and either Cap-
tain Clint Sandusky or Milt Eskowitz
in sixth. Johnstone is still undecided,
but leans a bit toward Sandusky in-
asmuch as he has defeated Eskowitz
in practice matches.
Michigyan 11e
Defeats Normal
By Late Rally
(Con4inued From Page 1)
single into left field. Ted ran back
and made a beautiful 'circus' catch to
retire the side.
The game was featured by excellent
fielding on the part of the Wolver-
ines. On several occasions miraculous
stops turned what ordinarily would
have been hits into outs.
'Lefty' Johnson went the entire dis-
tance on the mound for Michigan
Normal.
Michigan Normal

-1

Max And Prino Sign For Title Bout june 14

PLAY &

BY-PLAY
By AL NEWMAN--
Sam And John. .. .
WELL, I NOTE with considerable
satisfaction that Sam Insull is
now back in Dillinger Land. They set
his bond at $200,000 and the attorney
for the defense said that the govern-
ment was not playing in their league
at all and no spik inglees. This is re-
markable in that $200,000 is probably
just about what Insull would have
paid for private detectives to shadow
Attorney Richberg when that Chicago
attorney was investigating the gas
business in Chicago. Just so much
chicken-feed.
Time was when Insull was Re-
spectable Person number one around
Chicago. Now quotations list him at
approximately 3,333,333 out of three
and a third millions. That is unless
Dillinger is there right at present in
which case he is considered 3,333,332.
Of course Dillinger may be there and
he may not be. John was reported
to be in Chicago, Binghamton, N.Y.,
Milwaukee, Wis., some place in Ohio,
someplace in Michigan and some-
place in Canada last weekend. Some
weekend, eh?
They chased Insull over some thir-
teen thousand miles with considerable
energy and intelligence and they got
him. They have been just chasing Dil-
linger over a couple of thousand miles
and you cannot say all those nice
things about the chase either. They
haven't gotten him yet. Maybe it
would have been better with Sam if
he had been a good shot.
* * *
EARLIER THIS SEASON I advo-
cated a crew for Michigan, find-
ing that the entire Huron Valley would
have to be flooded to give us a stretch
long enough. So I decided that that
would be too much trouble for one
person.
Dartmouth has its first crew this
season, and failing a stretch of water
nearby they are training up at Lake
Mascoma about fifteen miles away.
Well, there's always the Detroit River.
We could have crew headquarters at
Ecorse.
Or we might have a canoeing team
right here on our own Huron River.
The local talent as manifested at
this season is most unusual to say the
least. And what a boost for the canoe
manufacturing industry.
Baer Is Suspended
By Boxin Solons
NEW YORK, May 8. -(/P)-Max
Baer, heavyweight title contender who
meets Primo Carnera for the cham-
pionship here June 14, was suspended
today by the New York State Athletic
Commission for failure to appear
when summoned.
He came to the commission of-
fices after the regular meeting was
over and the officers had departed
for the day.
Bert Stand, secretary of the com-
mission, said the solons merely wished
to discuss matters incidental to the
championship match with the chal-
lenger.

WOMEN'S
S P 0 R 1 -S-
New W.A.A. Board
Ruth Root, newly inaugurated
president of the Women's Athletic
Association, has announced the mem-
bership of the W.A.A. board for 1934-
35. Several women who were active
as sport managers this past year will
retain their positions as head of those
activities on the new council.
Lavinia Creighton, Mary Stirling,
Clarabel Neubecker, Jane Brucker,
and Mary Potter are among the old
members to continue on the board.
Miss Stirling will act as swimming
manager next season. Miss Neubeck-
er will be archery manager, and Miss
Brucker riding manager. Miss Potter
is the head of the newly-dignified
.ce hockey team.
Billie Griffiths, last year's W.A.A.
president, was chosen as the Michi-
gan representative to the American
Federation of College Women.
A list of the other W.A.A. board
members and their new positions in-
:,ludes: Lucille Betz, Intramurals;
Brenda Parkinson, point recorder;
Lavinia Creighton, hockey; Eliza-
beth Oberdier, basketball; Betty Ev-
ans, outdoors; Julia Wilson, dancing;
Mary Tassey, tennis; Margaret Con-
nellan, golf; Marion McPhee, bad-
minton; Betty Bell, fencing; Patricia
Woodward, rifle; Jane Haber, bowl-
ing; Emily Paris, ping pong.
* * * '

Yanks And Giants Lead Their
Leagues By Slender Margii
It's an early stage in the game but nals have come along like the lR
indications in the first eighth of the Birds of pennant years. They h

I

present major league campaign point
to the fact that except for one or two
changes, the teams have arraigned
themselves in the predicted order of
their September finish.
In the National League we find
New York, Chicago, Pittsburgh, Bos-
ton, and St. Louis in that order. At
the bottom, there is Brooklyn, Phila-
delphia, and Cincinnati. With the
exception of St. Louis which is ex-
pected to advance to a more threat-
ening position, this is supposedly their
natural order.
In the American Circuit, New York
leads, followed by Cleveland, Boston,
Washington, and Detroit. Philadel-
phia, St. Louis, and Chicago bring
up the rear. According to experts,
there should be an interchange of
positions between Cleveland and
Washington, and perhaps Boston and
Detroit.
During the past week, the Cardi-
BASEBALL
Behind the effective six-hit pitch-
ing of Tommy Bridges, the Detroit
Tigers took the third game of the
Boston series, 5 to 1, and returned to
the first division, the Red Sox drop-
ping to fifth place. The teams will
meet again tomorrow before the Ti-
gers move on to Philadelphia.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
New York 8-11-0, St. Louis 3-9-2.
Philadelphia 2-6-0, Cleveland 0-3-0.
Washington 7-8-3, Chicago 6-12-0.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Cincinnati 7-9-0, New York 3-7-2.
Pittsburgh 5-11-0, Brooklyn 2-8-0.
Philadelphia 13-18-1, Chicago 6-10-
4.
St. Louis 5-12-1, Boston 4-8-1.

-Associated Press Photo
The friendly enemies of heavyweight boxing, Champion Primo
Carnera and Challenger Max Baer, posed in this fashion when they met
in New York recently to sign for their title bout. Baer has dropped his
cinematic aspirations for the time being and will be after the crown the
night of June 25.

won seven straight games and are i
an apparent tie for fourth positior
this after losing seven of their fir,
nine games. The Yankees headed int
first place after fumbling around tr
bottom of the first division. The:
rise was due primarily to a veritab:
orgy of homers manufactured t
those two great industrialists, Rut
and Gehrig.
Only three games separate tY
league-leading Giants from the fift
place Cardinals, while the secor
place Cubs are one-half game b1
hind. The Yankees are one game 1
the good and only three games aw,
from the fifth place Tigers.
July 4 is not very far away. TI
old adage says that the team in fir
place at that date will of a certain
win the pennant. Western teams d
clare that two New York teams w.
not be in their present posts at th
rdate.It will be a tough race.
E - U -'R -O-P-E
Round Trip 3rd Class Tourisl
FNGLAND ..........$144-54) $188.04
SFRANCE.........$149.50 $190.04
GERMANY ........$161.00 $200.04
ITALY$.....182.50 $240.04
Other classes quoted free.
Tours and Cruises advertised anywhere,
53 days, 6 countries, $528 3rd, $598 tourist,
38 days, 6 countries, $378 3rd. $447 tourist
Passion Play included. From New York or
steamers where tourist is the first clam
on ship,.
D. & C. to cleveland and uffaTlo.
Phone your order Tickets deliverer
No extra charges ever
KUEBLER TRAVEL BUREAU
Bonded for Your Protection Since 1917
Ask Your Local Banker
OFFICIAL Local Agency
for All Lines, Tours and Cruisne
601 E. Huron St. 11h. 641;
HURRY!. HURRY !
Follow the crowd to
'CORBETVS
BIG SALE
Michaels Stern Suits
$1850 $350
$25 & $30val. $35 & $40val.
Alterations at Cost
Bi-Swings, Double-Breasteds,
Single Breasteds
TOPCOATS 25% Off

Fielding Featu res
Michigan's 3 To 2
Win Over ]Norral
By ART SETTLE
A pitcher just couldn't lose a ball
game with the support accorded Pat-
chin by the Wolverines yesterday.
Four brilliant plays by the infield on!
batted balls that were labeled hits,
were largely responsible for Mich-
igan's 3 to 2 win over Michigan Nor-
mal.
In the second inning, with none out,
Packard, the Normal catcher, smashed
a hard line drive which appeared to
be headed for center field. Clayt
Paulson shouldn't have come close
enough to touch the ball, but he took
a running jump, speared the smash
with his bare hand, and landed on
his neck somewhere in the outfield.
He completed a play the like of
which the fans will never see again.
In the same inning with two out,
Johnson hit a hard grounder to the-
left of Oliver. Russ went over fast,
scooping up the ball with his gloved
hand and made a perfect throw to
first, getting his man. This caused thc
Ypsi boys to mutter something about
horseshoes and luck.
Paupson pulled another beautiful)
fielding play in the sixth, when he
went far to his right for Wendt's
grounder, and threw to first from a
kneeling position, but it didiz't count,
as the umpire called the runners safe
on a close play. When Petoskey ex-
ecuted his game-saving catch in the
ninth, the Normal boys were con-
vinced that it wasn't in the cards for
them to win.
The game was the fastest, snappiest,
most thrilling one, played in many a
seasoll.

Tracksters To
Oppose 0.5. U.
In Night Meet

In the first outdoor night meetj
that they ever competed in, Coacha
Charlie Hoyt's Varsity tracksters will
clash with the Ohio State track team3
Friday night in Columbus. During the'
indoor season the Wolverines handed
the Buckeyes a 24 point defeat at the
Field House, and indications are that
the Ohio squad will not show great
power Friday.
Powerful arc lights will be sus-
pended above the track and field to
provide ample light for the meet. The
Ohio State tracksters were hosts to
Notre Dame last week in a similar
meet.
Michigan still has an impressive
hospital list with coaches expressing
doubt as to the possibility of using
Capt. Tom Ellerby or Cass Kemp in
this week's meet, and Dave Barnes
appears to be out for the rest of the
season. Ellerby and Kemp are drill-
ing daily and are expected to be in
shape for the conference meet on
May 18 and 19. Ward, who has been
rn the injured list for two weeks,
will be entered in three events, the
high hurdles, 100-yard dash and the
,iigh jump and seems to be in good
cnough shape to take a trio of firsts.
In the track events Michigan ap-
pears to have a decided edge al-
though Moore, in the mile, and Ar-
nold, in the 440, are expected to press
the Wolverine stars. Neal. Ohio State
shot putter, is favored to take a first
in this event. The Michigan squad
will leave for Columbus Friday morn-
ing, about 25 men making the trip.

Archery Scores Due Saturday
Miss Dorothy Beise, faculty archery
adviser, has announced that the qual-
ifying scores for the archery tourna-
ment must be turned in at the Field
House by Saturday noon. The score
is to be computed on 24 arrows shot
at a distance of 30 yards.

II

I"

. - f

o-1 L
MI

COOL CLOTHES
for WARM DAYS
IRISH LINEN suits in single-
and double-breasted styles. Fea-
turing belted backs in the single-
breasted models.
PALM BEACH specials in all
styles and colors.
LINEN DINNER JACKETS
-cool and smart-looking for
formal evening wear.
MARQUARDT
TAI OR-MADE CLOTHES

I

$30.00
$25.00
X22.50
$19.50

COATS, Now
COATS, Now
COATS, Now
COATS, Now

...$22.50
$18.75
..-$16.88
. $14.63

0

Ostland, ss
Devine, 2b ......
Wendt, 3b .. . .
Packard, c . . .
Worzniak, lb
Johnson, p .,... .
Quinlan, rf
Parker, if.....
Maska, m ......
Moroz, m.....

AB
.4
.4
.,4
.3
.3
.4
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0
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0
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0

A
2
3
2
1
0
2
0
0
0
0

E
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

WALK A FEW STEPS
AND SAVE DOLLARS
Tom Corbe
YOUNG MEN'S SHOP
116 East Liberty St.

334 South State Street,

(Over Slater's)

II

m

wommum

Totals,.
*One out wl

.. ...30 2 425* 10 1
hen winning run scored.

.... _ .

tt

LOOK 'EM OVER, BOYS !

Artz, rf
Oliver, 3b .
Petoskey. se
Paulson, 2b
Wistert, 11)
R cgeczi, If .
Ratterman,
Chapman,
Patchin, p .

Michigan
AB R
. ... . 3 2
.4 0
2 0
.... 4 0
.n .... 3 0
mn . . ..3 0
..., ..4 0
.... . 4 0

lI
1
2
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0
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0
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2
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0
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0
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HOM~f.,OMNGand

VALUES THAT DEMAND ACTION!
QUICK ACTION, TOO!

III

MAY

FESTI TAL

WEEK

1

Today!

Ut

Totals ....
Mich. Normal ..
Michigan .....

..32 3 8 27 13 0
.....000 200 000-2
. ...000 020 001-3

Remember
MOTHER'S
DAY
SUNDAY, MAY 13th
With a Box of
CANDY

a
,>
'
_~
a.

A SPECIAL
SELLING
50 TOPCOATS
15 PATTERNS
and Sizes 3 5 to 44.
Broken lines of coats purchased
to sell up to $30.00.
A REAL OPPORTUNITY,
TO SAVE !

W 'S

BOOKSOES

III

We extend a cordial invitation to Homecoming and Festival Guests and
sincerely hope that on your tour of the campus and the city, that you
will visit
MICHIGAN'S BEST BOOKSTORE
Our stores abound in books which cannot fail to be of interest especially
at this time, and include MUSICAL LITERATURE, MUSICAL IN-

It

rI

TERPRETATION, ANALYSIS, BIOGRAPHY,
HISTORY, CRITICISM, ETC., ETC.

DICTIONARIES,

Assorted Chocolates
1-lb. box ............
De Luxe Book Assort-
ment, 20 oz.......,.

39c

While they last, Today
SALE PRICE-
50
Tweeds, Polos and Fleeces

A Complete Line of Michigan Souvenirs: MICHIGAN VIEWS, CAL-
ENDARS, PACQUES, BOOK-ENDS, JEWELRY, BANNERS, PEN-
NANTS, ETS., ETC.

.00

i

.

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