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May 03, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-05-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

E MICHIGAN DAILY

w

fitzAin the first place and because they didn't, as
soon as trouble with the police became imminent,
assert themselves and leave the group which in-
sisted upon driving about Detroit streets in annoy-
ance of the police who had gathered in expectation
of May Day riots.
We would be loath to presume that the University
group was actually looking for trouble when it
went to Detroit. Possibly it was merely a coin-
cidence that the trip was made on the very day that
riots were being guarded against in the city and

Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
fnd the Big Ten News Service.
sari ted lollgiutt're
C93Minnl ... 'VEo 13 -
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is enclusively entitled to the use
frrr republication of all news dispathces credited to it or
not otherwise credited in %hi paper and the local news
published herein. All righs of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
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second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
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Offices: Student Publicathns Building, Maynard Street
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
-Representatives: College Publications Representatives
In., 4G East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylson Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago..
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4.925
MANAGING EDITOR.........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN
CITY EDITOR........................BRACKLSY SHAW
EDITORIAL DIREOOR............C. HART SCHAAF
SPORTS EDITOR ..................LBERT H. NEWMAN
WOMEN'S EDITOR.....................CAROL J. HANAN
AUGHT EDITORS: A. Eis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, William
G. Ferris, John C, Healey, George Van Vleck, B. Jerome
Pettit.
BPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Arthur W. Car-
stens, Roland L. Martin, Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Marjorie Beck, Eleanor Blum
Lois Jotter, Marie Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: C. Bradford Carpenter, Paul J. Elliott,
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Kenneth Parker, William m. Reed, Robert S.Ruwtch,
Arthur S. Settle, Jacob C. Seidel, Marshall D. Silverman,
Arthur M Taub.
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rison, Sally Place, Rosalie Resnick, Jane Schneider.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-124
BUSINESS MANAGER..... ...W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER. . .....BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
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DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Noel Tur-
ner; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
ServceRabert Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circula-
tonl and Contracts, Jack Efroymson.
ASSISTANTS: Milton Kramer, John Ogden, Bernard Ros-
enthal, Joe Rothbard, George Atherton.
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Mary Bursley, Peggy Cady,
Virginia Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevieve Field, Louise
lorez, Doris Gimmy, Betty Greve, Billie Griffiths, Janet
J4ackson, Louise 'Krause, Barbara Morgan,- Margaret
Mustard, Betty Simondb.
FRESHMAN TRYOUTS: William Jackson, Louis Gold-
smnith, David Schiffer,' William Barndt, Jack Richardson,
Charles Parker, Ro'oert Owen, Ted Wohlgemuth, Jerome
Grossman, Avn'rr, Kronenberger, Jim Horiskey, Tom
Clarke, Scott, Samuel Beckman, Homer Lathrop, Hall,
Ross Levin; Willy Tomlinson, Dean Asselin, Lyman
Bittman, John Park, Don Hutton, Allen Ulpson, Richard
Hardenbrook, Gordon Cohn.
NIGHT EDITOR: E. JEROME PETTIT
S'
Trouble Seekers
Usually Find It. . .
O NCE AGAIN a group of University
students, under the leadership of
so-called communists, have managed to make the
headlines of metropolitan newspapers, gain the
University some unearned and undeserved negative
publicity, and obtained the limelight which such
students seem to be perennially seeking.
Flaunting banners, singing the "Internationale,"
and creating a general disturbance, these stu-
dents, accompanied by a local pastor and a man
affiliated with the University faculty, drove about
the streets of Detroit in a truck until the police
forced them from the city.
The Detroit police, by the time they finally cor-
nered the group, were in anything but a genial
mood. Nevertheless it requires no great stretch of
the imagination to reach the conclusion that the
officers who so rudely hauled the students from
the truck by force, pushing and mauling them,
went a bit too far. Police officers are often inclined
to be that way. When a "small" man is given a
bit of authority which is too large for him he us-
ually becomes domineering. Detroit policemen are
obviously not to be excepted from this general type.
Certainly the students could have been expelled
from the city in gentler fashion.
On the other hand not a single student who
took part in the "demonstration" Tuesday has any-
one to blame for the manner in which he was
treated -or mistreated -but himself. Certainly

those who made the Detroit trip, whether for the
avowed purpose of upholding communism or for
purposes of sociological study, are -or at least
should be - old enough to realize by this time that
any group organized as was the one in question
usually ends up in much the same way as did
the gathering on Tuesday.
The student leader of the group, the well-known'
Mr. Cheyfitz, certainly has gained a reputation in
local parts which should warn all students against
participation in the activities which it is his
wont to organize. None of his enterprises has borne
fruit beyond the unpleasant type of publicity which
this recent venture brought forth. And if a student
wished to make a sincere sociological study he could
do no worse than to tie himself up with any one
of the campus groups with which Mr. Cheyfitz is
affiliated. Tuesday's affair demonstrated this facti
only too well.
We feel sorry indeed for those who still insist
that they accompanied the group to Detroit for
purposes other than the "waving of a red flag."

when communists throughout the world were as-
serting their independence. We couldn't, justly,
pretend to such ignorance however. In the light of
Mr. Cheyfitz's activities of the past, it seems more
likely that the group found in Detroit about what
it might have expected.
It is indeed a shame that the University must
suffer to any extent whatsoever for the activities
of the handful of students who flaunted a Mich-
igan banner last Tuesday. We don't think that it
will suffer to any great extent from the publicity
which surrounded that affair because those who
appreciate the institution for what it really means
will of course realize that the University itself is not
at fault.
As to the action which could, but probably will
not, be taken against those who led in the so-called
attempted demonstration, we have little to say.
That of course rests with men who, from past
experiences, are more than capable of protecting
the University's interests. We are certain, however,
that very few tears would be shed if Mr. Cheyfitz
were far enoughremoved from the campus that he
would find it impossible ever again to lead others
into the making of such unfortunate mistakes,
The Opera Is Back;
Let's Keep It. .
TODAY THE Union Board of Direc-
tors will meet to decide whether, in
the light of this year's revival performance of the
Union Opera, the production should be continued
next year. We feel that we are reflecting the senti-
ment of the majority of students in asking them
to decide affirmatively.
"With Banners Flying," this year's opera, has
been the subject of unlimited comment, both pro;
an con, but there have been none who have denied
that, given more favorable circumstances, the pro-
duction will regain the high position they once held
in campus esteem. This year the cast and produc-
tion staff were hampered in that they were working
on something new, but next year, and in the years
to follow, they will profit from the lessons learned
and present greater and more perfect shows.
Only praise can be given to the manner in which
Milton Peterson directed the opera this year, to
the efforts of all students connected with the
show, and to the type of production which was
brought to the campus, It is on the basis of these;
definite indications of deep interest, sincerity, and
ability to stage a good student opera that we
place our plea for the continuation of the tradition.
The T[heatr e
COMEDY CLUB SEES IMPORTANCE;
OF ORIGINAL PRODUCTION
By PROF. KENNETH T. ROWE,
WITH THE PRODUCTION of Vincent Wall's
"Little Love," a premiere of a play written by a
student at the University of Michigan, Comedy,
Club is at once making an immediate contribution
to the dramatic life of the campus, and is calling
attention to a need. Availability of experimental3
production is essential to adequate development
of dramatic writing. Going back six years, there,
began a period lasting three years when Play Pro-,
duction, under the direction of Mr. Windt, was able;
to provide laboratory production for a large nun-'
ber of new plays written by students at this Uni-
versity,
Following these productions three books of the
one-act plays were published, many of the plays
having since been widely produced. (Mr. George
Wahr, the publisher, told me one day that he,
had just received requests for production from
San Francisco and Philadelphia). There was an
awakening of interest in drama, and it seemed to,
me at the time that the tangibleness of dramatic
production and the co-operation of the production,
and writing groups resulted in a general stimula-
tion of creative spirit on the campus.
Then came the years of financial stress and
lack of funds for such productions 1tough
academic channels, and with the condemning of
University Hall Theatre and Mimes Theatre, a
dearth even of places in which to produce plays. In
the meantime, manuscripts of plays that might be
produced have been accumulating, and Comedy
Club cannot be too heartily congratulated on bring-
ing one of these plays to light.

The interest attached to Vincent Wall's "Little
Love" as a winner of the highest award for drama
in the Hopwood competitions of last year should
assure the success of this first venture of an extra-
curricular organization in the presentation of a
new play. The play, from manuscript, promises
both to be highly entertaining in the theatre and to
stir discussion of the thought and point of view.
The magnitude of the Hopwood Awards should
make the University of Michigan a center of crea-
tive writing among universities of this country.
Furthermore, the Awards are fortunately located at
the University of Michigan to realize their fullest
usefulness. Here is a large university centrally 1o0
cated drawing students from all parts of the coun-
try, which means variety of material and freshness
of approach. This is not merely a speculation but
a statement of what has impressed me most in the
teaching of play-writing. But the potentialities in
the field of drama cannot be fully realized until
there is provision for laboratory production of every
promising play as part of the process of play-writ-
ing.
The ideal to look forward to is a workshop the-

Music and Drama
"CANDLE LIGHT"
AT THE DETROIT WILSON
PRECARIOUSLY DELIGHTFUL is the only
phrase which can adequately describe "Candle
Light," which the DeForest Players are presenting
at Detroit's Wilson Theatre all this week including
a matinee Saturday as the first offering of what
bids fair to be a most successful stock season.
Adapted from the Austrian of Siegfried Geyer by
P. G. Wodehouse, the English .humorist, "Candle
Light" glides smoothly from complication to com-
plication, from the valet masquerading as the
prince to the parlormaid who is a baroness for one
romantic evening.
Margaret Fitch, who will play most of the star-
ring roles during the season, has the part of the
errant maid who falls in love with the valet, Josef,
a prince for once, but what a prince.
The plot is no more than this: light, frothy, and
studded with typical Wodehouse repartee. Ains-
worth Arnold, popularly remembered here for ap-
pearances in three Dramatic Seasons and for direc-
tion of numerous campus productions, and who
is the Company's director, has fashioned from
it a gay spring show giving promise of an.en-
tertaining season.
-P.J.E.
production of their own plays is not only the center
of interest of dramatic activities, but among the
outstanding events of the year to the entire cam-
pus. Any such production may turn out to be the
inauguration of a Broadway success, of a new
dramatist. Sometimes a play is brought before an
audience in this way which is more interesting
than current Broadway productions - many con-
siderations other than intrinsic merit enter into the
arrival of plays on Broadway. In any case there
has been the pleasure and excitement of drawing
together all the creative activities of the theatre
from among the students themselves,
"Little Love" will be presented tonight, tomorrow
and Saturday nights at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
TOPAZE
A Review
By PROF. W. F. PATTERSON
ON TUFSDAY NIGHT, at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre, the Cercle Francais gave their thirty-
fourth play, Marcel Pagnol's cynical comedy, To-
paze, first performed in Paris October 9, 1928. The
performance was notable from several points of
view, certainly the most effective since the charm-
ing and finished revival of the medieval "Le Mys-
tere d'Adam" in 1930, which was the previous high
point of achievement for this organization in
the field of the drama.
The title role of Albert Topaze in this interesting
and witty moral satire was admirably filled by
Frank Funk, who has appeared in several plays this
year, notably as Lord Cecil in "Elizabeth the
Queen," in which he easily carried off male honors.
The same qualities that made that bit of acting
superior were observable in Mr. Funk's interpreta-
tion of the sensitive, impractical schoolmaster who
evolves into a dominant and unscrupulous man of
affairs. Even the difficult and abrupt transition
from Act III to Act IV, when Topaze comes finally
out of his chrysalis -a sudden change one feels
the dramatist may not have sufficiently prepared
-Mr. Funk managed with an art that was intelli-
gent and convincing. I use the word "art" advised-
ly, for his acting was more than competent. The
delicate shadings in the considerable range of emo-
tions portrayed, the meaningful poses and gestures
always in character, the unforced phrasings of a
French completely natural gave evidence of a con-
siderable native gift so channelled by reason that
no effect lacked proportion and measure.
Second acting honors go to Edward Campbell,
who brought to the role of the aristocratic and un-
principled Roger de Treville a suavity and polish
of manner that were wholly in keeping as well as
French that was "impeccable" in intonation. For
the third award I find myself embarrassed to
choose. Maurice Demers gave a forceful interpreta-
tion of the grafter Castel-Benac His rages were
especially histrionic, in the favorable sense. Harry

Baltuck's sardonic impersonation of the "vener-
able" old man furnished an excellent moment.
John Maulbetsch was effective and sympathetic, as
the French say, in Tamize. Robert Hogg was pom-
pously provocative of laughter as Muche in a "get-
up" that made him be his supposed age.
I have not conferred honors, "by the authority
vested in me," upon the actresses of the troupe.
Their work was definitely on a lower level than
that of the men. Isabel Bonicave brought to the
difficult role of Suzy Courtois, Castel-Benac's mis-
tress, a poise of manner which usually stood her
in good stead, a knowledge of how to wear well
chosen clothes such that one of the audience called
her "the best dressed heroine of the year" and
which made her invariably pleasing to the eye. She
showed a sympathy with her part such that one
wonders why she was not consistently better. A
little more genuine vigor united with her sense of
the ironic might have turned the trick and made
her performance evenly good..
Ruth Karpinski, as the Baronne Pitart-Verg-
niolles, proud mother of three, had not the oppor-
tunity she had last year as Mme. Jourdain in "Le
Bourgeois. Gentilhomme." She endeavored with
some success to make the most of what was, after,
all, one of those ungrateful. character bits which
give little upon which to build. Nan Diebel's part
offered more real meat than Miss Karpinski's, more
chance to develop a personality in the round. She
failed to make the most of the opportunity. Her
third act appearance was slightly more convincing
than her first, but it too lacked "punch."
Norma Cove as the "dactyloghraphe," William
Miller as "un maitre d'hotel." and John Schmidt

FESTIVAL
MAY 9, 10, 11, 12
Artists

MAY

1, E-I

LUCREZIA BORI ..... Soprano
ROSA PONSELLE . . ..Soprano
JEANNETTE VREELAND...
.Soprano
COE GLADE ........ Contralto
PAUL ALTHOUSE ...... Tenor
ARTHUR HACKETT ...Tenor

THEODORE WEBB.. Baritone
CHASE BAROMEO. .. . Bass
GUILA BUSTABO....Violinist
MISCHA LEVITZKI ..Pianist
MABEL ROSS RHEAD......
..............Accompanist
PALMER CHRISTIAN Organist

Organizations
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION.................30 Voices
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA.......... 70 Players
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FESTIVAL CHORUS.............400 Voices
THE STANLEY CHORUS .. ........... ... ... . . ... Women
Choral Works
SONG OF PEACE (Ein Friedenslied) ........ . ....... Robert Heger
NINTH SYMPHONY ......,.........................Beethoven
THE SEASONS .................. . . .. ................ Haydn
THE UGLY DUCKLING ......................... . ... . English
BY THE RUINS OF BABYLON .. ............ . . . . .... Loeffler
Conductors
EARL V.MOORE .............................Musical Director
FREDERICK STOCK ......................Orchestra Conductor
ERIC DeLAMARTER .............. . .... . ...Associate Conductor
JUVA HIGBEE ........... . ......... . .Young People's Conductor
PROGRAMS
I. WEDNESDAY EVENING, 8:15
ROSA PONSELLE, Soprano
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Prelude and Fugue ("St. Anne's") E-flat major .......... achoc
Aria, "Bel Raggio Lusingher," ("Semiramide")...........Rossin
MISS PONSELLE
La Mer (The Sea).......... ............................Debussy
From Dawn to Noon at Sea
Gambols of the Waves
Dialogue Between the Wind and SeaVerdi
Arias, "Adio del Passato" (La Traviata")-...--......Bizet
"Chanson" Boheme" ("Carmen")........................ ..Bie
MISS PONSELLE
Rapsodie Espagnole......................................Ravel
Songs with Piano:Stfn oad
Fresehi Luoghi Pratt Aulenti.........efnDoud
Marietta's Lied from "Die Tote Stadt" ..ErichKoKruogd
Respetto.....................................E.- Wolf-Ferrari
Si Tu'Le Voulahis............ ..........F'-Paolo Tosti
My Lover He Comes on a Ski-. .... ...Clough-Leighter
ROSA PONSELLE
Mr. Stuart Ross at the Piano y
II. THURSDAY EVENING, 8:15
TEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano MISHA LEVITSKI, Pianist.
PAUL ALTHOUSE, Tenor PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist
CHASE BAROMEO, Bass UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
CHICAGO SYMPHONY"ORCHESTRA
EARL V. MOORE and FREDERICK STOCK, Conductors
"The Seasons".--.....-....-...-..... . .....Haydn
An Oratorio for Soprano, Tenor, and Bass Sol,
Mixed Chorus, Orchestra, and Organ
MISS VREELAND, Messrs.ALTHOUSE and BAROMEO and the
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION-
Concerto in G minor for Pano and Orchestra,'Op. 22 ....Saint-Saens
Andante sostenuto
Allegro scherzando
Presto
III. FRIDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30
GUILA BUSTABO, Violinist ERIC DE LAMARTER and
YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS JUVA HIGBEE, Conductors
STANLEY CHORUS
Allegro from Concerta No. 2 in F major for Trumpet an
Strings ("Brandenberg")................-.-...................Bach
Songs:
On Wings of Song ................................Mendelssohn
Hedge Roses.....................................Shubert
Blue Danube Waltz ................. .. ..... .. J. Strauss
' YUN PEPL'SCHORUS......
Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso for Violin and Orchestra-
Op. 28........-......... - Sa
GUILA .. ...SaiT-Sen
Cantata, "The Ugly Duckling" ..............English
-YOUNG PEOPLE'S CHORUS.......nls
First 'Symphony....-......... ..........Milhaud
By the Waters of Babylon .-..........-. ...Loeffer
THE STANLEY CHORUS
Andante and Rondo-Allegro from "Symphony Espagnole"
for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 21 ...... "..... .... ... ..........La~lo
MISS BUSTABO
IV. FRIDAY EVENING, 8:15
LUCREZIA BORI, Soprano
CHICAGO SYPMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Fantasie, "A Night on a Bare Mountain"..............Moussorgsky
Aria, "Voi che sapete" ... ...........Mozart
LUCREZIA...............Mzr
Symphony No. 4 in v minor, Op 98.......................Bahms
Recitative and Aria of Liu ('EFnfant Prodigue") ...........,Debussy
MISS BORI
"Sailor's Danece" (.Palot Rouge)............ ............... ..Giere
Aria, Depuis le Jour" t ,ouse") .......................Charpentier
MISS BORI
V. SATURDAY AFTERNOON, 2:30
JEANNETTE VREELAND Soprano THEODORE WEBB, Bass
COE GLADE, Cotralto" UNIVERSITY CHO0RAL UNION
ARTHUR HACKETT, Tenor CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
Overture to "Cariolanus," Op. 62....... ...... Bethoven
Symphony No. 9, in D minor, Op. 125 ,..............Beethoven
MISS VREELAND MISS GLADE, MR. HACKT TT, AND MR. WEBB
UNIVERSITY CHORAL TNION
Tone Poem, "Ein Heldeneben," Op. 40...............Strauss
The Hero
The Hero's Adversaries
The Hero's Con anion
The Hero's Battlefield
The Hero's Mission of Peace
The Hero's Ecape 'rom the World - Conclusion

VI. SATURDAY EVENING, 8:15
3EANNEt IYREWTAND, Sonrano CHASE BARIIEO;Bass

Listen,
youse.mugs:
This he re now May
Ga rgoyle is acomin'

out today.
find some

Ya kin

of

me

henchmen any place
on the campus this
morning'. An' I don't
misnd tell in'yait'S a
swell issue, if youse
don't believe me I'll
come down there
some night an' take
ya all fer a ride: Git
it?
And now, ladies and
gentlemen, that you
have heard a bit un-.
willingly from our
impetuous mechanic
that our May issue is
comi ngout today we

hve nothing

more

to say to. you. Sorry
i f the brute disturbed
you.

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