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September 19, 1933 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1933-09-19

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPT. 19,

THE MICHIGAN DAILYTUESDAY, SEPT. 19.

.

.1

cart ha Cook Social Director
Tells Of Visit In Soviet Russia

"Leningrad is a city of youth, se-
rious faces, and poorly dressed, bare-
footed people," according to Miss
Margaret Ruth Smith, social direc-
tor of Martha Cook Building, who
spent three days in the Soviet city
last summer.
"Little is left of the grandeur of
old Russia. Cathedrals of czarist
times have been changed into anti-
religious museums or have been de-
stroyed to make room for working-
men's^ apartments and club houses.
The palaces of the late czar are for
the most part intact and have been
opened to the Soviet public for in-
spection. One is especially impress-
ed by the fact that there are no shops
along the streets of Leningrad. Sup-
plies are obtained at the Soviet com-
missaries.
'The children of Russia are well
cared for in the state nurseries,"
Miss Smith said. "I saw 5,000 chil-
dren take part in a great demonstra-
tion before the Winter Palace. They
all wore red hair ribbons or ties. The
discipline was perfect. The group
could be compared to an army of
miniature soldiers."
Miss Smith found the factories she
visited "most interesting and en-
lightening." They seemed alive with
a spirit of accomplishment and hope.
Whereas the people on the streets
looked resigned, the men in the fac-
tories appeared thoroughly satisfied
with their work. Miss Smith ex-
plained that the entire factory has
the right to vote and that women are
considered equal to the men in the
Soviet.
Every attempt is being made by
the Soviet government to educate
its people to an appreciation of the
arts. Miss Smith saw a group of
peasants being conducted= through
the Hermitage Art Gallery which
boasts of an extraordinarily fine col-l
lection of Rembrandt, Reubens and>
Van Dyke. -;
"The Soviet comic opera 'Mar-+

riage Market' was interesting," Miss
Smith said, "and the chorus and or-
chestra were remarkably good. The
audience which was made up of
peasants and workers in their every-
day clothes was very responsive.
Everyone seemed to be enjoying him-
self.
"Tourists in Leningrad are given
every consideration. Although the
inhabitants of the city go about on
foot or on the overcrowded street
cars, Lincolns are provided for the
convenience of the visitors. With
the exception of these one seldom
sees cars on the streets of Len-
ingrad."
League Receives New
Students Friday Night
Incoming students will be hon-
ored at a reception given Friday
night, according to Grace Mayer,
'33, president of the League.
Although the plans have not
yet been completed, Miss Mayer
says that all students that are new
to the university are urged to at-
tend so that they may get better
acquainted with the League.
Recent Bride Honored
At Brilliant Reception
At a large reception held Sunday
afternoon Mrs. R. Bishop Canfield
honored Mr. and Mrs. Walter Simp-
son Holden, Jr., with a tea at her
home on Washtenaw Avenue. Mrs.
Holden, formerly Barbara Anne Can-
field, spent last year studying
abroad and was a pledge of Alpha
Phi sorority her previous year at the
University.
Mr. Holden, '33, who was a mem-
ber of Phi Kappa Psi fraternity, re-
sided in Oak Park, Ill. The couple
are moving to their apartment in
Chicago, Ill., within a few days.

W. A. A. Plans
To Make New
Requirements
Plans for Sports Day and changes
n the requirements for membership
n W. A. A. were discussed last night
t the first meeting of the year.
Billie Griffiths, '35, president, pre-
ided; she was assisted by Marie
Ietzger, '35, vice-president, and
'harlotte Simpson, '34; secretary.
.:he chairman of the membership
ommittee, Marie Murphy, '35, re-
orted on the suggested changes
;hich the committee had assembled
luring the summer. Miss Griffiths
vill explain the new requirements in
'er talk before the freshmen Wed-
nesday.
Campus Dormitories To
Entertain New Members
Newcomers to the dormitories will
be welcomed this week by a number
of varied informal parties, designed
to acquaint them with their sur-
roundings.
The old residents of Martha Cook
are entertaining the new members
at 10 p. m. tonight at a fire-side
sing. On Thursday night the dormi-
tory is holding another informal
party with singing and dancing.
On Thursday night Betsy Barbour
House is having its traditional pop-'

At Chicago

Fair

President of W. A.

Campus Notables
Find Employment

By JANICE WRIGHT
Familiar faces from unexpected
corners greeted Michiganites attend-
ing the Century of Progress Expoi-
tion this summer, for a large num-
ber of campus personages were hold-
ing a variety of jobs.
Pulling "rickshaws" evidently ap-
pealed to several of the track team,
for Charles DeBaker, '33, captain
last year, Ned Turner, '33, formerly
of the Olympic track squad; Edward
Lemen, '34, and Harmon Wolfe, '31,
were seen in coolie garb. Henry C.
Hajek, '35L, Jerry Rea, '34E, and
William O'Neil, '32, who is well-
known to patrons of the Parrot, were
also trotting old dowagers around,
while Herbert Roosa, '33, was cap-

tain of the chair guard.
While in the Common Brick House
we noticed Bill Bohnsack, '34, busi-
ness editor of the Gargoyle, w. ho in-
formed us that George Vani
'35, was with General Houses. Hugl h
Conklin, '31, former president of the
Union, was reported to be in the
Travel and Transport building.
At General Motors display we
found William Weeks and Robert
Tiffany, both of the class of '36.
working as cashiers. Charles Kline,
'32, former 'business editor of the
Daily, was an accountant in the A.
and P. Carnival.
Philip Shorr, '34, was working in
the Streets of Paris exhibit and we
noticed Jane Thalman, '33, who was
prominent on campus last year, in
the Hall of Religion. Stinson Com-
pany had Bernard DeWeese, Jr., '34,
in their employ, while Bill Trowe,
ex-'35, was with the Greyhound
Bus Company. Virginia Taylor, '33,
active on League committees, poured
tomato juice for the Heinz company.

Alpha Delta Pi Honors
New Members At Supper
The members of Alpha Delta Pi
entertained several of their sorority
transfers last night at a pajama
supper. The transiers are: Eunice
Parker and Jean Walkers, of Bir-
mingham, Ala., Lena Bosker and
Helen Casterlin of Utah, and Phyllis
Penly of Ames, Iowa.
Mrs. P. S. Shearer, National Ex-
ecutive Secretary of the Alpha Delta
Pi sorority is expected from Ames,
Iowa the latter part of the week to
pay her yearly visit to this chapter.
Where To Go,
Motion Pictures: Michigan, "Mid-
night Club," "Disgraced;" Majestic,
"The Silk Express," "Heroes For
Sale;" Wuerth, "Hell Below;" Whit-
ney, "Uptown New York."

Billie Griffiths, '35, president of
W.A.A. will speak to the freshman
women Wednesday on the changes
in the requirements for membership
which were discussed at a meeting
of the executive committee last
night.
corn and pajama party to enable
the residents to become better ac-
quainted. A buffet supper will be
given at 6 p. m. Friday by the old
girls in honor of the new ones.
The Freshmen at Mosher-Jordan
Hall are having a "Get Acquainted"
party at 10 p. m. Wednesday.

t

6

NW DOOU ART

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Orientation
'T~eek

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for

-DANCE

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We are pleased to present an entirely
new selection of the most delightful fall
creations in costume jewelry .... every-
one irrelsistible and everyone perfectly
designed. Be sure to stop by and see
them.
COLLEGE AND FRATERNITY JEWELRY
WATCH AND JEWELRY REPAIRING
OPTICAL 'DEPARTMENT
ENGRAVING

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If you can't . .
Find your old girl
Or don't . .
Get a nCew girl
Then come . .
Looking for one-

A GET-TOGETHER

AL

COWAN

GOOD)YEfIR' S

ARCADE
JEWELRY SHOP
Nickels Arcade

and His BAND
f"aturin HELEN TALBOTT
"Bluer than blue"

MICHIGAN LEAGUE BALLROOM

Phone 9727

Carl F. Bay

Friday,
Tickets
Slater's

September 22
at
and Wahr's'

9 til 3
Admission
50 cents a person

COLL1___EGE SHOPS
-- ead toGret ou ndWelcomes
You to "Michigan"
These smart campus shops are now open and
what sports clothes . .. what afternoon in-
trigues . . . what evening strategy! ACCESSORIES
We're particularly anxious to show you these
smart fashions college girls will just adore. GLOVES
You'll be an instantaneous success in any- are the four-button length slip-
thing selected here - because we know our >ns and smart novelty cuff
college girls - and we know what college styles of pliable kidtskin in black
"rown and new shades $1.95 to
men admire.94s

LT NOTHING-----

i

KEEP YOU FROM....
ATTENDING THE.. .
Glf-/frC rAT r .r

Bi5C
OR

WELCo
FO

IENTAT[ON WEEK~
ME DANCE
R NEW ARRIVALS
MICHIGAN LEAGU
....SATURDAYS
. ...... DANCE FRC
......TO THE SMC
... . .. ....

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E BALLROOM
SEPTEMBER 23
OM 9 TILL 12
,OTH, SMART
.. MUSIC OF

The Sport Twins- a cardigan and a pull-on
are inseparable -you just won't be with-
out them - New fall colors $5.00 to $7.50.
The Skirt's a plaid and ours have matching
scarfs at $7.95 for the set.
The mannish coat will be at home on the
campus- notched collar and patch pock-
ets -.%29.'fl- e'the~rs to'X39.50_

UNDIES
Yolande' tailored hand made at
$2.50 to 57.50 and Vanity fair
garments at 51.00 and up.
HOSIERY
You'll like Gotham Gold Stripe
Hosiery - the new fall shades
at 85c, $1.00 and $1.35.
SHOES

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