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January 11, 1934 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1934-01-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TIIJ

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
sammaa
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IdNG f N( R wtyi OFYT h vt. a['N- N I n. wf ++W

as either to suppose it necessary or find it en-
joyable to spatter up books with offensive evi-
dence that they have been read. That such re-
marks and symbols are unadulterated annoyance
to subsequent readers will be testified to by every-
one who makes honest use of the library.
Laws aplenty have been passed in an effort to
stamp out the offense. That they are so difficult
to enforce is an added reason for those who like
to read from a clean page to build up a sentiment
of disgust against persons who insist on leaving
in the books they read a trail of unsightly de-
facement.

Communists to rise, or Japan may get China
throughly whipped and slant her eyes in our
direction. Is the country that bled so that first
herself and then Mexico, Cuba, the Phillipines,
and then the world should be free for the develop-
ment of industry and democracy to strip herself
of her arms and then embrace her conquerors
with the other cheek because she has no means
of resistence? No! Peace follows preparadness!
A Washington
BYSTANDER

- :
:; .

The Theatre

Established 1890
Published every morning except Monday during the
University year and Summer Session by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association
and the Big Ten News Service.
1933 HATI1in-A <oeiR>~ 1934
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is enclusively entitled to the use1
for republication of all news dispathces credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and the local news
published herein. All rights of republication of special
dispatches are reserved.
Entered at thee .ostOffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as1
second class matter. Special rate of postage granted by
Third Assistant Postmaster-General.
Subscription during summer by carrier, $1.00; -by mail,1
$1.50 . During regular school year by carrier, $3.75; by
mal, $4.25.
Offices: Student Publications Building, Maynard Street,1
Ann Arbor, Michigan. Phone: 2-1214.
Representatives: College Publications Representatives,1
Inc., 40 East Thirty-Fourth Street, New York City; 80
Boylson Street, Boston; 612 North Michigan Avenue,
Chicago.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR ..........THOMAS K. CONNELLAN1
CITY EDITOR.........................BRACKLEY SHAW
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR.............C. HART SCHAAF
SPORTS EDITOR...................ALBERT H. NEWMAN
DRAMA EDITOR ........... ..... JOHN W. PRITCHARD
WOMEN'S EDITOR.................CAROL J. HANAN
NIGHT EDITORS: A. Ellis Ball, Ralph G. Coulter, Wil-
liam G. Ferris, John G. Healey, E. Jerome Pettit, George
Van Veck, Guy M. Whipple, Jr.
SPORTS ASSISTANTS: Charles A. Baird, Donald R. Bird,a
Arthur W. Carstens, Sidney Frankel, Roland L. Martin,;
Marjorie Western.
WOMEN'S ASSISTANTS: Eleanor Blum, Lois Jotter, Marie'
Murphy, Margaret D. Phalan.
REPORTERS: Ogden G. Dwight, Paul J. Elliott, Courtney
A. Evans, Ted R. Evans, Thomas Groehn, Robert D.
Guthrie, Joseph L. Karpinski, Thomas H. Kleene, Rich-
ard E. Lorch, David G. MacDonald, Joel P. Newman,'
Kenneth Parker, William R. Reed, Robert S. Ruwitch,
Robert J. St. Clair, Arthur S. Settle, Marshall D. Silver-
man, Arthur M. Taub.
WOMEN REPORTERS: Dorothy Gies, Jean Hanmer,!
Florence Harper, Marie Held, Eleanor Johnson, Jose-
phine McLean, Marjorie Morrison, Saly Place, Rosalie
Resnick, Mary Robinson, Jane Schneider, Margaret
Spencer. BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2-1214
BUSINESS MANAGFER .............W. GRAFTON SHARP
CREDIT MANAGER ...........BERNARD E. SCHNACKE
WOMEN'S BUSINESS MANAGER .....................
............................. CATHARINE MC HENRY
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS: Local Advertising, Fred Her-
trick; Classified Advertising, Russell Read; Advertising
Contracts, Jack Bellamy; Advertising Service, Robert
Ward; Accounts, Allen Knuusi; Circulation, Jack Ef-
roymson.
ASSISTANTS: Meigs Bartmess, Van Dunakin, Milton Kra-
mer, John Ogden, Bernard Rosenthal, Joe Rothbard,
James Scott, David Winkworth.
WOMEN'S BUSINESS STAFF
Jane Bassett, Virginia Bell, Mary Bursley, Peggy Cady,
Virginia Cluff, Patricia Daly, Genevieve Field, Louise
Florez, Doris Gimmy, Betty Greve, Billie Griffiths, Janet
Jackson, Louise Krause, Barbara Morgan, Margaret
Mustard, Betty Simonds.
NIGHT EDITOR: GEORGE VAN VLECK
News Would Revive
"Old Reliable".. .
W ITH INTEREST we read in the
Detroit News' editorial columns
that the 1933 Century of Progress Exposition at
Chicago was a "success - scored by well directed
private initiative notwithstanding the obstacles."
The News cites the beneficial effect of the em-
ployment of so many thousands, and concludes
with an editorial glance "to the time when private
enterprise gradually can again be made the old
reliable for keeping Americans busy?"
The "old reliable"? Where has the "old reliable"
been since Oct. 29, 1929? Asleep? More likely
dead, it seems. At least, to paraphrase a recent
speaker on the Michigan campus, the "old reliable"
system, which may be construed as meaning the
unbridled individualism of the Old Guard Cap-
italists, presents some similarity to a man with a
chronic disease who rallies for brief periods only
to sink still further,
The truth of the matter is that "old reliable"
wasn't reliable at all. If it had been, why would
the News and others have to be talking about
reviving it?
Our President himself has made the statement
that "we can never go back." Undoubtedly he
meant that we can never go back to the balmy
Coolidge era, when potential dissatisfaction with
the status quo was still dormant. In other words,
we aren't going to trust to "old reliable" again,
because to do so is to invite a worse chaos than
ever to our doorsteps.
Whether "the shape of things to come" will be
Socialistic, Red, or a "partnership" such as the
President describes between the employers, the

workers, and the long forgotten consumers, at
least we shall not turn back to "old reliable." This
catchy phrase floats along on an airy individual-
istic breeze. It was most enjoyable while it lasted,
but we do not think it will return.
The voluntary extensions of the steel, auto,
and other codes show that even the employers are
in favor of co-operation rather than self-directed
destruction. Possibly they will change their minds
after the government has aided them in setting
their houses in order. Ingratitude is only human.
But undoubtedly the government, and the people
at large, will never again consent to leaning over
backwards and picking up "old reliable."
It is to be hoped that the country has learned
its lesson well this time, for the consequences of
another five-year lesson are best left undescribed.

The latest production of The Children's Theatre, a
new form of Ann Arbor entertainment, is here de-
scribed by the director of the theatre.-The Editor.
"JACK AND THE BEANSTALK" -
A CRACK MELODRAMA.
By RUSSELL McCRACKEN
" JACK and the Beanstalk," which opens at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre this afternoon as
the second play of the Children's Theatre of Ann
Arbor season, is rip-roaring melodrama from way
back. It has all the elements of a good old fashioned
tear-jerker. There are the pathetic widow,
crushed down by the weight of poverty, the black
moustached villain who drives her out into the
open highway to starve. There is the red-blooded,
two-fisted, hard hittin' hero; there is the sweet,
picked-on, Lillian Gishian heroine who does a
good deal of weeping. Everything is there, even to
the musical accompaniment in the pit, for the
purpose of edging the audience off their seats dur-
ing the more dramatic moments.
Melodrama is a highly exaggerated dramatic
form, and its very exaggeration makes it theatre
of an exciting type. Most audiences nowadays
are very dull. Dull because they are not required
to be anything else. They have been fed on real-
istic plays for a long time, and the realistic play
demands that one be very still in one's seat and
sort of "peek in" on the problems and squabbles
of ordinary people. In the days when melodrama
was a steady diet, character was greatly height-
ened, and simply drawn. Actors then played out
to the audience, and the audience, taking it to
heart, joined in with the swift pace of the play.
They hissed when the villain forclosed the mort-
gage, they wept when the sweet-little-thing was
beaten up by the unfeeling husband (whom in
every case she had been forced to marry). In
realistic terms that type of theatre was very
artificial - the acting was over-energetic, the
scenery required a great deal of imagination to
swallow (being painted in perspective as it was,
and pictorializing often weirdly romantic situ-
ations). But the energy of the performers, and
the direct appeal to the audience both through
stock responses and the imaginative, made such
theatre experiences loved. Going to the theatre
was an excursion, a holiday. People shouted, and
boo-hooed, and roared from their bellies. The
theatre then was rather child-like, but it was a
place where one had a good time - not a psychol-
ogical laboratory where characters one wouldn't
speak to on the street were dissected for two
hours and a half.
The Children's Theatre has definitely made it
its credo to produce plays of a "holiday" type.
Not all melodramas, of course. But unreal plays
- imaginative plays - where one must accept to
the very letter of the law the make-believe of the
show.
"Jack and the Beanstalk" ought to appeal to
grown-ups as well as children. The heart-rend-
ing situations that children will take in all ser-
iousness will be grand, hilarious comedy for adults.
Children will be frightened of the big, strong,
hairy Giant, but adults will recognize him for
what he is, an old wind-bag.

By KIRKE SIMPSON
WASHINGTON, Jan. 10- Congressional reac-
tion to the "brutally frank" Roosevelt budget
pictures at the outset dwelt on the "courage" it
took to lay it down, particularly in an election
year. It would have been so easy to soften it.
Men now facing grave personal problems as they
seek reelection were inclined to grasp at the bold-
ness of the move.
The vast majority of legislators were surprised
at the staggering cost totals the President re-
vealed for recovery legislation already enacted,
let alone that to come. With the exception of the
additional billion or so for which the White House
will ask this fiscal year, any tabulation of the ex-
penditure authorizations made by the special re-
covery session would have indicated what to ex-
pect.
No one on the hill seems to have made such a
calculation; or if he did, he kept the results to
himself.
* * *
THE most emphatic tribute to presidential
courage to be uttered formerly came from a
party opponent, Representative Fred Britten, Illi-
nois Republican. He interjected it as a side re-
mark into the liquor talk debate but undoubtedly
with the budget message in mind:
"If we have ever had a President during my
membership in this house -which has been 21
years -who is fearless and distinctly courageous,
it is Frank -D. Roosevelt," Britten said. "Very
few men in any political walk of life have taken
the chances he has taken in the last year, or in-
tends to take in the present year."
THERE are other things which might have
prompted that budget message and the bleak
picture of extreme costs and minimum revenues
it presents. What Mr. Roosevelt did was to use the
economy' bill on normal expenditures as the goose
to lay the golden egg of government credit on
which he relies.
The slash in veteran's benefits and in govern-
ment pay come under that bill. Both were under
attack in both houses of congress before the bud-
get message came out. Bills to repeal the act, to
restore federal pay and veterans compensation in
full, were piling in. A new measure to pay the full
bonus in special currency had been dropped in the
hoppers. And this is a Congressional election
year.

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GARGOYLE
OUT
MONDAY
To the Student Body of
the University of Michi-
gan, and others: Liquor,
knee-control and pros-
perity are back. So, mci-
4enwlly, is the Gargoyle.
On Monday, January 15,
the editors offer for your
undivided attention: So-

11

...now applied to telephone cable

Themanly art
of self-defense

tM -- 6v

I

Collegiate Observer

, _. _ _ __. _ _ . _ _. wev,

$ 1

$ 1

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4

Campus Opinion
Letters published in this column should not be con-
strued as expressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily. Anonymous communications will be disrearded.
The names of communicants will, however, be re-
garded as confidential upon request. Contributors
arc asked to be brief, confining themselves to less
than 300 words if possible.
ANSWER TO THOSE..
WHO PRAISED SHERWOOD MESSNER
To The Editor:
I am not in the habit of writing to newspapers,
but most certainly an answer must be made to the
letter that praised Mr. Sherwood Messner's recent
resignation from the Reserve Officers Training
Corps. Mr. ,Messner may be a fine, outstanding
young American or he may be a mere glory-seeker,f
I don't know him personally, to be sure; all I can
say is that while he was making up his mind to
quit the R.O.T.C., hundreds of students were
thinking of joining or had joined. And it was such
an unnecessary thing to do. He might as well
have resigned from the Boy Scouts Of America.
The effect would have been the same. Neverthe-
less, there are always those who are at hand to
pat a pseudo-martyr on the back; even a dis-
gruntled boy-scout.
The letter in question hailed Messner for the
issues he is standing on. What are these issues,
I ask him? I should welcome an explanation from
him or from those who signed that letter.
Consider: after the United States government,
now so worthily headed by the great-souled
Roosevelt, and also torn by internal and external
troubles, and in constant fear of socialists and
communists, who probably help cause war and
depression in the first place, after it has gone to
all the trouble of establishing a fine tradition and
has provided the funds to maintain it, even at the
price of war; while it is carrying on to make brave
soldiers of our college-boys, Mr. Messner resigns.
Such things are enough to threaten the intol-
erance of all right-minded people who firmly
believe it our duty to fight for their country, right
or wrong. After all, as Pilate said, "What is
truth?" One has to beleive in something. Why
not the R.O.T.C.?

By BUD BERNARD
A questionnaire circulated among students at
Wingate College by the faculty showed the fol-
lowing results. The students said that beer is
terrible, that grapejuice is man's finest drink,
that "David Copperfield" is their favorite novel,
and Alfred Lord Tennyson their favorite poet.
Men students declared they preferred blondes,
provided they were modest!
* * *
The Southern California Daily Trojan asks
if you've heard of the bald man who didn't
join the NRA because he couldn't do his
"part."
* * *
No more "wall flowers" at Lenoir Rhyne Col-
lege; at least, not if their student paper can
help it, for in its columns is reserved a Love
Want section where lonesome co-eds, tiring of
the lack of attentive males, can advertise their
plight, hoping that some gallant Romeo will come
to their rescue.

-
C

ph isticated Lady,

Our

Privy - Building.

.. ..

Own C l o t h e s Horse,
Proof of the Piddling,
Modern Music, Prepos-
terous People, Michi-
gan's All-Americans and

varied and interesting ar-
ticles will grace the crea-
tion, plus another of
Gargoyle's original cover
designs. Climb on the
banid-wagon and get your
fifteen-cent copy at the
Campus Sale.

Other

1

--I

HOUSE OLwDER AgM316

Western Electric, manufacturing unit of the
Bell System, now makes a tape armored telephone
cable ready to meet all comers. When laid directly
in the ground, this cable defends itself against
moisture, grit, corrosion and other enemies.
Besides the usual lead sheath, the tiny copper
wires in the cable are guarded by seven layers of
paper, jute and steel tape-all saturated or covered
with asphalt compound.
In pioneering and producing improved appa-
ratus, Western Electric contributes to the year
'round reliability of your Bell Telephone.
BELL SYSTE
WHY NOT TAKE A TRIP HOME BY TELEPHONE?
-TONJGHT AT HALF-PAST EIGHT

H

According to Madame Albertina Rasch, the
model co-ed is a combination of the Venus de
Milo and Mae West.
Brooklyn Polytechnic has a new course. It is
called the "Gab Lab." Here one may become em-
broiled in a lively bull-session on anything from
technocracy to a clinical discussion of the fine art
of osculation.
The Purple and White, Millsaps College paper,
in its co-ed edition, listed ten points each on
"how to hold your girl" and "How to hold your

man."
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

HOW TO HOLD YOUR GIRL
Be nice but not good.
Talk lots.
Don't drink.
Be serious.
If you don't know the ropes learn them.
Be sweet.
Don't tell dirty jokes.
Be faithful as possible..
Be sincere.
Be thoughful of her.
HOW TO HOLD YOUR MAN
Don't be a goody-goody, but be nice.
Don't talk too much.
Don't act sophisticated.
Be serious and act wise and worldly.
If you have brains, don't show it.
Be sweet but don't be dependent.
Don't drink; don't cuss.
Be virtuous.
Don't expect him to be too faithful.
Don't suggest too early marriage.

RIGH T NOW is the dime to rent those

vacant rooms.

Within a month there

will be many changes in student rooms
and those who use the Cassilfied Ads
will not find themselves with vacant
rooms.
TODAY ... Call 2-1214 or stop at the
office on Maynard Street and avail your-
self of this nedium.
CASIH RATES..., .Hle a Line

On Defacina

I

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