100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 11, 1934 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1934-01-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

)AV, JANUARY 11, 1934

THE MICHIGAN IIATLY

)AYiiJANUAR 11, 193411.- <1rL1. i.\ y/.1'faj, .a
THE MTCIETAN ATT

Rumor Says Michigan

Will Get National Wrestling

Athletic Board,
Big Ten Heads
Must Concuir

Freshman Swimmers To Feature Open Swim

Wildcats Get Ready
Northwestern Meet
Be Held Saturday

For
To1

Rumors that the National Collegi-
ate wrestling will be held here this
spring have not yet been confirmed
by the University Board in Control
of Athletics, but such confirmation is
expected in the near future.
Even if the Board did not accept
an invitation, the matter would still
have to go through the hands of the
Big Ten directors and be accepted
by them.
At present, the Big Ten meet is
scheduled for Ann Arbor but if Mich-
igan accepts the National bid, the
meet will probably go to some other
Conference school. Indiana has
voiced a desire for the meet and will
undoubtedly get it if the National
meet is decided for Michigan.
Starting Lineup Doubtful
Coach Clifford Keen yesterday put
the wrestling squad on its final drive
in conditioning for the opening meet
of the season with Northwestern here
Saturday night. The matches will
take place at the Yost Field House
and the admission charge will be 25
cents. Students will be admitted
free of charge upon presentation of
of coupon books.
The problem of the men starting
against the Wildcats took on a dif-
ferent turn yesterday with Coach
Keen's statement that he may start
Hilton Ponto in the 175 pound di-
vision. This move of Ponto from the
165 pound class may find Lewis Par-
ker as the Wolverine representative
at 165 pounds and settle for a time
the doubt as to who will hold down
that position for the remainder of
the season.
Fiero vs. Landrum
The lively battle for the 118 pound
job continued merrily yesterday when
Jim Landrum and Don Fiero went
through a hard fought, evenly con-
tested match. Both men have been
competing on practically even terms
this season. Landrum is a veteran
of last year's team and has won a
letter. Fiero is a senior and has been
on the squad for three years.
Captain Art Mosier, John Spoden
and Joe Oakley are three veterans
who will undoubtedly see action in
the meet.. Seymour Freedman, al-
though he did not win a letter last
year, appeared in several meets and
appears to be the logical choice for
the 135 pound representative.
The 145 pounder for Michigan is
still in doubt. The choice is between
Harrod, Lewis, and Sweet. Harrod
may get the call because of his win-
ning the All-Campus title and excel-
lent showing throughout the train-
ing season.
Week-End Trials To
Establish Caliber "f
Frosh Track S quad
If the present freshman track
squad lives up to its advance notices
and continues the good form it has
shown thus far in practice, Michigan
will not lack track material for some
time to come. There are a number of
outstanding men on the squad whose
names it would not be wise to men-
tion at least until after the freshman
trials are held this coming week-end.
The pole vault, shot put, and the
high jump will take place tomorrow,
and the remainder of the events will
occur on Saturday. The entries are
as follows: 60-yard dash, Dennis,
Graves, Rose, Stoller, Steinhausen,
Williams, Uslan, 'W. White, H. White,
and McKee. In the 660-yard run,
Brelsford, Aikens, Davidson, Hall,
Stiles, Ladd, Burlesen, Connolly,
Born, Sullivan, Sharfstein, Stiegel,
Morrison, and Dispenza. ,
There will be a longer run of six
laps around the Field House track
in which the following will take part:
Pinkerton, Whitney, O'Connell, Mair,
Brelsford, Lawton, . Wardell, and
Good.

There will be a 65-yard high and
low hurdle event in which Osgood,
Uhl, Boyle, and Jordan will partici-
pate. McKee will also joint the low
hurdlers.
The weight men are Andros, Cal-
louette, Friedman, Graper, Oberman,
Osborne, Sears, Schumann, Middle-
comb, Wopot, and Zaiser. Those in
the high and broad jumps are
Drucker, Frau, Graves, Hill, Kerri-
gan, Mitchell, Moore, Upon, Zajanc,
and Hogan.

Yearlings May
Upset Varsity
In First Meet
I Swimmers To Meet Frosh
In 7 Events; Strength
Lies In Relays
Thirteen freshmen swimming and
diving stars who are expected to com-
prise the Wolverine Varsities of the
future, are entered in the various
events of the Open Handicap meet
which will be held tomorrow night in
the Intramural pool.
Even without the benefit of the
handicaps which will be imposed in
the meet tomorrow night, there are
several of the freshmen who could
give the Varsity natators a stiff battle
for individual honors, among them
being Willard Crittenden Drew,
Frank Barnard, George Allen and
Bob Mowerson. All will compete in
the meet except Mowerson, former
Ann Arbor High star and one of the
fastest of the yearling sprinters, who
will be unable to compete.
Enter Seven Events
The freshmen are entered in seven
events with Barnard and Edward
Vander Velde each entered in three
events, followed by Allen, Crittenden,
Ben Grady, and Henry Vander Velde
who will compete in two events.
One of the outstanding teams en-
tered in the 100-yard relay, according
to Coach Mann, is the all-freshman
outfit of Drew, Barnard, Matt Siel-
ski, and Allen. Vander Velde and Crit-
tenden, paired with Gage and Denni-
son of the Varsity, will also compete
in the relay and are given a good
chance to come out in front of the
field.
Three yearlings, Allen, Grady, and
Frank Person, are entered in the 75-
yard medley with Allen conceded the
best chance of the first year men.
The 50-yard free style also lists three
freshmen with Vander Velde, Bob
Kennedy, and Barnard expected to
give the Varsity sprinters close races.
Strong in Breast Stroke
The breast stroke will find Vander
Velde and Crittenden attempting to
uphold the honor of the yearlings
against the Big Ten champions while
Fred Cody is the sole first year entry
in the 50-yard back stroke. With Dick
Degener and Ned Diefendorf, Varsity
divers, both unable to compete,
Orady and Art Kuesel, the yearling
entries, stand an excellent chance of
winning first place in the handicap
diving.
Bob Ashe and =Barnard will repre-
sent the yearlings in the 220-yard
free style with the Vander Veldes
teaming in the 25-yard double oar to
complete the list of freshmen com-
petitors.
Minnesota Begins
Indoor Grid Drills
MINNEAPOLIS, Jan. 10. - ( -
Bernie Bierman,.head football coach
at Minnesota, already eyeing the 1934
Big Ten season, sniffed the winter air
today and called the first winter
practice for this week.
However, Bernie won't put his
charges through their paces in the
open, but will hold his practice ses-
sions in the field house. He plans
intensive work with freshmen and
last year's scrubs primarily. It is
not compulsory for members of last
year's varsity.
Bierman, usually reticent, broke
his customary silence before the start
of last season and declared -"the
1934 Gophers are the ones to watch."
And, while he has not retracted
that statement, he has not amplified
it either - and makes no prediction
of a Big Ten championship for the

Gophers next fall.
I;t

PLAY & - BY-PLAY_
By AL NEWMAN
Yale And Kipke... .
* * *
MAYBE NOW SOME of my Eastern friends will believe me when I tell
them that Michigan athletes are unpaid for their services on the
athletic field. I have lately gotten heartily sick of their jeers and gleeful
snorts when I tell them this fact, and sicker yet of the fast-fading halo
that the Big Three have erected over their football heads. Apparently de-
emphasis is just fine business when there is a depression on and football
receipts are low anyway.
But now that people have taken to snaffling onto pieces of change
more readily and can actually spend such pieces of change on something
besides coffee, cakes, and the odd pint of likker, these Eastern education-
foundries are getting their football faces lifted and are getting prepared
to cut themselves at least a small piece of the currency which everybody
says is floating around.
PRINCETON LED OFF BY HIRING some mid-westerners with ideas to
coach the Tigers. These mid-westerners had the peculiar idea that the
line was not just seven men who were to put on such a dumb performance
that the backfield looked like world-beaters in contrast. Princeton has also
been very very lucky in that many fine freshman players have come to old
Nassau during the past two years.
In fact, you never saw such luck in your life. Report tells me that
practically the entire Princeton freshman team was comprised of captains
of prep teams from far and near and that the boys as a unit were nothing
to trifle with. New York sports writers call them "Princeton's Lucky Coin-
cidences."
And now the once-spiked rumor that Yale is angling for Coach Kipke
is again raising its ugly head. In fact, it is supposed to come out into the
open today, with the possible augmentation that they are also angling for
practically the rest of our coaching staff, which is probably the best in the
business.
WELL, WE ARE JUST A JERK-WATER COLLEGE and we can't even pay
our coaches much, let alone our athletes. We have a great athletic
tradition and try to get along out here, but as far as over-emphasis is
concerned -well, if the Big Three are atpresent engaged in de-emphasis,
we are practically paying people to stay away from our football games.
I wouldn't blame Coach Kipke and the rest for leaving and going into
the big time. We can't pay them what they would get in the East because
we are afraid of over-emphasizing football. Why a Dartmouth professor
told me that Jack Cannell, Dartmouth coach, got ten thousand last year
and you can take that rumor along with the rest for what it is worth.
Just remember that Cornell beat Dartmouth, we swamped Cornell and
Kipke gets considerably under ten thousand. The sum is incomprehensible.
No, I wouldn't blame them for going at all, although we'd all hate to
see it. Still, poor little Michigan would limp along somehow although for
goodness' sake I'd bar a game with Yale. That would be courting disaster.
Fate Of Michiran Grid Coaches
Appears To L1e In Newspapers

Merriman, Mass, Biegle,
Nahrgang, Buhl, Form
Well-Balanced Team
Fencing does not have the finan-
cial support of the University Board
in Control of Athletics this year, but

By CHARLES A. BAIRD
"All I know is what I read by the
papers," was Coach Harry Kipke's a
la Rogers' statement to The Daily last
night in connection with the widely
ballyhooed rumor that he is being
considered for the head coaching
position at Yale.
"I haven't been approached yet
and my friends seem to know more
about the situation than I do. It's
true that I was given a raise in sal-
ary here. But if I receive an offer
from Yale, I'll give it much consid-
eration before I make a decision."
And in the meantime newspapers
all over the country are playing the
story to the skies. "Yale Undecided
Between Harry Kipke and Tad
Jones," "M Staff Raid Is Consid-
ered," the headlines scream. And they
all make the assumption that all Yale
has to do is say "boo" and Michigan's
coach will come a running.
The New Haven Courier-Journal

come to Yale, along with his chief
aides, Jack Blott, Franklin Cappon
and Wally Weber." All of which riles
the Michigan student body and is
news, incidentally to Mr. Kipke him-
self.
Coach Franklin Cappon, when ap-
proached on the subject, said, I
haven't received an offer, but I'm not
interested in one. You can say that
I stay here." All of which is very
fine, indeed, and easily explained
when one considers that he is- the
likely successor to Fielding H. Yost,
when the athletic director retires.
Coach Weber said, "All I know is
what I read in the papers." No offer
has been made him.
Coach Blott said, "All I know is
what I read in the papers." No offer
has been made him either.
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan, just to
be different, said, "You can say that
I've been approached. No definite of-
fer has been made me, however. I

N

111111111I

D ANCE

$twub&
" 2e Serve to Seve .Alagrwz"
309 SOUTH MAIN SwfmEE
THE DOWNTOWN STORE
FOR MICHIGAN MEN
are offering a
PRE-INVENTORY
SALE
on Clothing
Now $19.50, $22.50,
and $25.50
O'C OATS
et 1 n\ cn r r

AT THE MICHIGAN LEAGUE
BILL MARSHALL
and His Twelve-Piece

AA
A EN AVANT el.. ~@tw.r4 A
A A
A A
A A

1111I

If

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan