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October 30, 1932 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

F Team Falls

THE MICHIGAN DAILY AG

Before

Powerful Michigan Normal Eleven,

15

to

Shaw Goe
For Score
40-Yard
Jayvee Squad
capped Badly
Of ReserveA
Ypsilanti O
Safety In Thin
Is Hurons' F
2 ,ouChdow
By HYMAN J. A
Severely handicapp
reserves, the Michigan
defeated this morni
game at Ypsilanti, 1
Michigan Normal squ
play of both teams
considerably by a st
wind that swept ac
throughout the game.
The Hurons, favore
shod over the Michig
ceived the opening kic
Smith, Normal halfba
64 yards to the Mi
stripe, where he was
Shaw. This displayc
the first play of the g
justify the pre-game
thereafter the "B" lin
Michigan took possess
on downs.
Huron Passe
Shaw got off on a
runs which brought1
to the Ypsi 28-yard l
"B" team fumbled an
The Normal eleven t
of passes, all of whic
plete, and then los
downs. The quarte
Michigan in possessio:
After an exchange
Michigan team started
the field which nette
a touchdown, with S
ski, and Zendzian lead
The final coup was n
who plunged two yard
tackle over thf goal
tempt to make the poi
down failed because
from center.
Shaw LeadsE
The Michigan "B" t
outplayed the Normal
defense and offense.]
ried off the lion's sha
ors on the offense.
The Hurons made t
in the third quarte
Oravec tackled Zendz
attempting to punt f
own goal line. Zendz
bad pass from cen
tackled before he co
of the goal line, mak
for the Normal team
Smith ScoresC
Ypsi made the othe
through the right si
line where they had
ness. Dave Smith to
yards through Michig
for the first touchdow
kicked the goal. Jame
the second touchdo
sprinted 11 yards aro
LINEUP
MICH. "B" Pos.
Ottoman.......LE..
Jacobson ....... LT..
Baird. .......LG..
Soodik ......... C....
Borgmann .....RG..
Ponto.........RT..
Van Akkeran . . . RE..
Shaw.........QB..
Zendzian .... LH. .
Greening... RH. .
Frankowski .. . FB. .

Substitutions: For N
jewski for Rookwell, T
son, Sanders for Ka:
for Smith, Miller for
man for Bowman, Han
Benedict for Dirkse, St
sky, Gruber for Earle;
"B"-Jacobs for Green
Soodik, McClintic forF
Officials: Referee-D
1 u in b i a); headlines
(Mich.); Umpire-For
Touchdowns: Michiga
Normal, Smith, Dirkse.
vec. Point after touch

s Over
"1 ;Michigan
SAfteri________
March Scores As Williamso
Is Handi-
TBy Lack
aterial:ack.
utplayed:
d Quarter
irst Tally;
ns Follow
RONSTAM
ed by lack of
"B" team was
ng in a close
by a powerful
ad, 15 to 6. The
was hampered
rong southwest
ross the field
d to run rough- :
an Jayvees; re- .
koff, and Dave " ga.
ck, ran it back ;
higan 21-yard
stopped by Lee a *A .
of strength on
;ame seemed to
predictions, but
fe stiffened and
ion of the ball Six points for Aichigan were
Bernard, Wolverine pivot man, ye
s Fail Capt. Ivan Williamson had bloc
series of long across the goal line for a touchdowi
the ball down out the game was outstanding.
line, where the ---
d lost the ball.
ried a number Varsity Golfers
h were incom- '
t the ball on B Fh
r ended with Beatfreshm
n of the ball.
of punts, the Team 18 To b
i a march down
d 40 yards and
haw, Frankow- Smith Is Only First-Year
ing the attack.
made by Shaw, Man To Win Match;
s through right Dayton Takes Game
line. The at-
nt after touch- In the Varsity-Freshman gol:
of a bad pass matches yesterday, the Varsit
avenged last year's defeat with a de-
Attack cisive victory over the freshmen, 18-
team decisively 6. The only freshman to win was
eleven both on Smith, who defeated Norman, 3-0.
Lee Shaw car-
re of the hon- The closest match of the day wa
fought between Captain Malloy, o
heir first score the freshmen and Dayton of the Var-
r when John sity, Dayton winning, 2 1-2-1-2. The
ian as he was game was even until the last hol
rom behind his when Dayton made a birdie and con
ian received a sequently won the match.
ter and was The other scores were Markha
uld get ahead (V) 2 1-2, Gallager (F) 1-2; Capt
ing it a safety Jolley (V) 3, L. David (F) 0; Nea
On ((V) 2 1-2, Rogers (F) 1-2; Menefef
r two counters (V) 2 1-2, Wenham (F) 1-2; Nestle
de of the "B" (V) 2, Parkin (F) 1; Norman (V) 0
found a weak- Smith (F) 3; and McPherson (V) 3
ok the ball 20 Hall (F) 0.
n's right guard Helen Hicks, former national am-
n, and Arnold ateur woman champion, broke the
s Dirkse scored women's record for the University
wn when he golf course Friday. The former rec-
und right end. ord was 87, but Miss Hicks in the
S morning made a new record of 83
NORMAL and later in the afternoon wen
.. , Asleyaround in 85. Miss Hicks stated that
.......Ashley she was pleased with the course and
.Earle thinks that it is one of the finest she
Kazlusky has ever played on.
... Rockwell
. . . . Rovinski Manders At Fullback
.. Oravec Is Fixture For Gopher
....F. Arnold P
.Smith MINNEAPOLIS. Minn., Oct. 29.-
........Dirkse (P)-University of Minnesota football
.Carsonlineups may be expected to include

State

Harriers Edge Out

Wolverines,

26 to 3.

n

Blocks Tiger Punt

Otte y Of State;
Leads Runners
By Half A Lapj

Newman, Favorite

For All

America,

Coaches Fear Hoosier Eleven
Will Hit TopForm Next Wee

marked down to the credit of Charles
sterday when he took the ball after
ked a Princeton punt, and stepped
'n. Bernard's defensive play through-
t BIG TEN
j STANDINGS

r

W
MICHIGAN . .3
Purdue ......2
Chicago.. ...2
Minnesota ...2
Indiana ... ...1
Wisconsin . . .1
Illinois.....1
Northwestern 1
Ohio ........0
Iowa.. . . .0

L
0
0
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
3

T
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
2
0

Pet.
1.000
1.000
.666
.666
.500
.500
.333
.333
.000
.000

Three Out of First Five
Positions Go To Maize
And Blue Aggregation
State Stars Upset
Ostrander, Michigan Ace,
Comes In Second; Hill
Follows In Third Place
By FRED A. HUBER
Although three of the first five
men to finish yesterday's cross coun-
try meet were Wolverines, Michigan
State annexed the meet by a 26 to 31
score.
Tom Ottey, running for the Green
and White team, led the harrier pack
home in the good time of 17:25. This
time was accepteable, considering the
weather conditions. The runners were
forced to start the grind uphill
against a strong north wind, which
also retarded them in the stretch.
Second to Ottey, but half a lap be-
hind him, came Bob Ostrander, Wol-
verine ace, who led the field in the
race against Detroit. Third place
went to another Michigan man, Bill
Hill, who sprinted in the home
stretch to pass Otto Pongrace, of the
Spartans. Pongrace finished fourth.
Rod Howell Is Fifth
Rod Howell, brilliant Maize and
Blue sophomore, came home in fifth
place. Then came the deluge. The
next four men to finish were from
State, and they cinched the meet for
the Spartans. Wissner, Small, Ham-
mer, and Fullerton took sixth, sev-
enth, eighth and ninth places.
Tenth place went to the ailing
Michigan captain, Doc Howell, who
nosed out Elliot of M. S. C. by the
narrowest of margins. Gardner of the
visitors was twelfth, and the final
scoring place of the meet went to
Dick McManus of Michigan, who
came home thirteenth.
McMillan's Showing Weak
One of the surprises of the meet
was the failure of Archie McMillan,
Michigan's star junior, to finish bet-
ter than fifteth" He followed his
teammate, Johnny Clarke, in.
Another upset was the poor show-
ing made by thesveteranrWesley
Hurd, of State. Hurd, who was en-
tered in the meet at the last minute
in place of Wildschut, ran seven-
teenth; Frazier, another of the vis-
itors led him home.
The last three places went to Bed-
enick, Simons, and Childs of Mich-
igan.
Coach Stagg Presented
With Letter By Illinois
CHICAGO, Oct. 29.-(P)-An honor
never before accorded to any but
University of Illinois athletes, the
varsity letter, was given A. A. Stagg,
University of Chicago's football
coach, before today's Big Ten foot-
ball game between the Maroons and
the Illini.
The Tribe of Illini, organization of
Illinois letter winners, presented the
"Old Man" with an "I" blanket, sym-
bolizing the varsy letter, just before
the kick-off. In his undergraduate
days, Stagg won varsity letters at
Yale and after coming to Chicago he
was similarly honored.

He has not, as have so many col- the heaviest forward wall in the Big
lege stars, been brought up to play Ten, its preparations are naturally
football. In fact he did not even be- understood with a lot of apprehen-
come interested enough to start play- uinhero
ing until he was in high school at so ee
Detroit Northern, where he also Going into history, Michigan holds
starred in the outfield for the base- a long lead over Indiana in football
ball team. He played half for North- competition. The Wolverines have
ern during his first year and remarks won six out of seven games played,
now that "a half has a lot less to in fact they have won as many games
worry about than a quarterback." as Indiana has scored points. The
Newman admits that he could get Indiana total of six points was scor-
along without studying, but of his ed in 1928 when the Hoosiers won
subjects the favorites are math and their only victory over a Michigan
science. He also team. Last year Michigan won 22 to
admits that he 0, but the difference between the two
doesn't train too -
much out of the
grid season. He
keeps in condition
playing tennis and W A
skating, which, in-
cidentally, are his
t.:..: for the Sle*ighi
hobbies. As to his
spare time, he tells
you cheerfully that
he wastes it.
N/wn tA ...: The worst illness
he ever had was measles, and the
most severe injury received in a foot-
ball game a broken hand. Both oc-
curred some time ago.
"My big thrill in football came
when I kicked the extra point that
broke the 13-13 tie in the Purdue-
Michigan game three years ago," says
the young man who has paved the
way for many a Wolverine touch-
down by his passes. fhe Big
The most embarrassing situation
he has ever found himself in was ec a
after passing over the goal line on
first down against Ohio State last
fall. ame i

Is Detroit Prodtct
By MARJORIE WESTERN
Among the men being mentioned
throughout the nation now at the
height of the football season as po-
tential All-Americans, Harry New-
man of Michigan is one of the fa-]
vorites for the quarterback post. He
wouldn't tell you that, however.

WkRS

)UNCE

Michigan football coaches are look-
ing forward to the approaching con-
test with Indiana but not without
certain misgivings, as a feeling has
arisen here that the Hoosiers will be
in top form when they encounter the
Wolverines at Bloomington next Sat-
urday. Considering that Indiana has
a line made up of veterans, perhaps

elevens appeared to be far less thy
that.
The game next Saturday will mar
the start of the second stage of Mich
igan's Big Ten campaign, three vic
tories having been won in the fir
half over Northwestern, Ohio Sta
and Illinois. Chicago and Minnesot
along with Indiana remain on th
schedule, and with the latent pow(
they have, any one of the three ma
upset Michigan.
Americansa re estimated as spcn
Amrcn r sintda pning $6 annually per capita for, med:
cines.
TY~EWRITERS - PORTABL
New, Seon.- and Rebuilt,
Snit;Corona, Noiseless,
Underwood, , m ington.
314_S.Ste dte t., n red
1 S. State St., Ann Arbor.

bells!

gest Cleaning
l That Ever
:o This City!

If
lY
bs
6s
of
e
,e
n
t.
,r
e
e
e
y
e
it
t
rU
e
e

Berlin

Gets Early

Start In Planning
Olympics Of 1936
BERLIN, Oct. 29.-W'P)-This city,
being chosen for the next Olympiad,
already has begun to map out a pre-
liminary program of the thousand
and one tasks to be tackled in order
to ensure the success of the world's
biggest athletic event.
The German stadium in the
Grunewald, where the track and field
events and possibly the swimming
contests will be held, is one of the
largest of its kind in the country.:
Its seating capacity of 50,000 will be
increased to about 80,000.
It is planned to put up an Olympic
village after the Los Angeles example.
Roughly, $1,000,000 is estimated to be
the cost of architectural adaptation
of the stadium to the requirements
of the Olympiad.j
Berlin traffic experts are of the
opinion the present street-car, bus
and subway connections to the sta-
dium are sufficient to meet the rush.
The three lines are capable of con-
veying 105,000 passengers per hour.
Dr. Theodore Lewald, chairman of
the German Olympic committee,
viewing the games from the economic
side, is convinced that not only Ber-
lin, but the entire country will profit
from the expected rush of visitors.
Taking into consideration the ideal
location of Berlin, just a few miles
from a chain of big cities, Dr. Le-
wald pointed out that four to six
million German tourists could visit
the city during the games, not to
mention the tens of thousands of
foreigners.

It has been stated many times that
Benny Friedman taught Newman
how to play football, but the false-
ness of this statement can be gauged
by the fact that they worked to-
gether for only a week at camp. New-
man says, however, that Friedman
taught him a lot about passing, the
field in which he first gained promi-
nence on the college gridiron.
In conclusion, he remarks, "I'd like
very much to play in the Rose Bowl,
and I know the other fellows would,
but before we ever get that far, we've
got three of our hardest games of
the season on our hands."
DIES AFTER LONG RUN
PASADENA, Calif., Oct. 29.-(/)-
Thomas Jackson, nineteen-year-old
California Institute of Technology
student and athlete, died yesterday
shortly after he had finished a four-
mile run at Tournament Park, near
his school.
Physicians said death was due to
a heart attack induced by the strain
of the long run.

OVE RCOAT

av 4v r s. w a sr w

Get Those Heavy Coats Out Now, Men!
Miracleaned and Valeteria Form-Pressed

C

Called for and Delivered for Cash
This Week Only -Oct. 31 to Nov. 6
When you can enjoy Goldman Bros.' famous
Miraclean quality at this very special price, you
just can't afford to pass it up. Try this superior
quality that makes clothes so fresh and lustrous.
and convince yourself that your money buys you
more all-round cleaning value at Goldman Bros.'
than you ever bought anywhere else.

Normal-Buga-
horpe for Car-
zlusky, Carson
Oravec, New-
zes for Ashley,
ine for Rovin-
for Michigan
ning, Ross for
P'onto.
oyt Rich (Co-
man -- Dunn
sythe (Mich.).
an "B," Shaw;
Safety, Gra-
down, Arnold.

"Manders-fullback" for a long time
to come.
This season there is Jack Manders,
all-Big Ten fullback in 1931, who is
bidding for an All-American berth
this Year.
Next in line comes Burt Manders,
Jack's younger brother, who already
has attracted attention as a fullback
on the Minnesota freshman squad.
And in Milbank, S. D., home town
of the Manders, there is a still
younger "Pug" Manders, who has
formed a habit of ripping up oppos-
ing high school lines.

ANN ARBOR HIGH WINSDOntakio
Ann Arbor High School scored its
sixth straight gridiron victory yester- F on
day morning, defeating Battle Creek
High by a score of 18 to 0. FerrisAnn "o 0
Jennings and Dick Jacoby starred for,603 C 5
the Ann Arbor school. The defeat was
the first Battle Creek has suffered
this year.

ME:N'S
SUITS
Miracleaned and Valeteria
Form-Pressed

PLAIN
COATS
Miracleaned and Carefully
Hand-finished

35c

501c

. .. . .

PING PONG or TABLE TENNIS
EQUIPMENT

PLAIN
DRESS
Miracleaned and Expertly
Hand-finished

FE LT
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Miracleaned and Skillfully
Re-blocked

IF

.._. _

I

li

I0

THESE FALL WEEK-ENDS .
will mean a lot more to you if you've
something to remember them by . .
Football games and fail leaves can't be
kept forever, but photographs will keep
them always in mind . . . But of
course they must be properly finished
and that means that they'll be

COMPLETE SETS
$1 to $8

PADDLES BALLS
EXTRA NETS

I

50c

I

Called For and

A New Value in

25.c
Delivered for Cash

FOLDING TABLES

SOLDMAN

5 x 9 $10.9

TABLES FOLD
TO 21/2X 41/2FEET

4x8 $9.95

r~ A ie

11

[I(

[i

U

,.o..-

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