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June 02, 1932 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1932-06-02

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THE MICHIGAN DATLY

SUMMER COMPANY TO PRESENTI
ENGLISH COMEDY FOR OPENING

the Philip Barry dcrama Paris Round,' was
cpertory Players when they produced that
the abilities of the performers during the

"The Chalk Circle"; C. K. Munroe's
comedy of English middle-class
life, "At Mrs. Beams": the gigantic
satire on the moving picture in-
dustry; "Once in a Lifetime"; Paul
Green's "The Field God"; John
Balderston's joke on eighteenth
century m a n n e r s, "Berkeley
Square"; Pirandello's "Six Charact-
ers in Search of An Author"; and
the' satirical and sophisticated Ital-
ian comedy, "The Mask and the
Face".
The staff of Michigan Repertory
group is comprised wholly of stu-
dents, both for the technical and
acting phases of production. The
casts for the plays are made up of
students enrolled in courses in Play
Production. The production of one
play every week for the duration of
the summer session makes ib pos-
sible for the student-actors to have
a nearly professional experience.
Generally casts rotate each week,
but students are often known to do
"bits" two, weeks in succession.
Stagecraft students handle the
technical work during performance
and assist with the execution of
the sets in the workshop.
The Michigan Repertory Players
was established four years ago at
the instigation of Dean Edward
Krauss, of the Summer Session, and
was founded for the purpose of pro-
viding entertainment to summer
students and townspeople. It was
felt that student actors could serve
the entertainment problem of the
community, and at the same time
find valuable experience for them-
selves in their work.
Mr. Windt with Prof. Chester M.
Wallace, of the Carnegie Institut
of Technology's drama school, were
directors for the first season, which
was four years ago, in the summer
of 1929.
Zoology Faculty to Iold icnic
The members of the zoology de-
l partment and their families hav
all been invited to attend the zoo-
logy picnic to be held at 1:3(
o'clock, June 4, at the Hall picnic
grounds on River boulevard. The
various members of the depart meni
makct up the numerous committee
which consist of the transportatiot.
finance, equipment' food, and en
tertainment committees.
A large spread of Mfood and nove
entertainment will be the fea ture
of the affair.

AURORAE FREQUENT
H. B CURTI SAYS
Northern Lights Are Most Usual
in March and September,
Astronouer States.
Sunday evening's brilliant and
extensive display of the auroracl
borealis, followed Monday by a
le.sser display, h; not expected 'o be
?oon repa.ted, acordirig to Prof..
1. P, Cur is, director of the Uni-
versity observatory. "Although therej
is no particular law governing the
frequency, the aurorac are most
frequent in March and Sptember;
ess frequent in Jtuy and Decem-
ber," he said.
The electrical phelnomenon, very
commonly known as the northern
lights, remained brilliant several
hours Sunday night, and even after
it had disappeared visually, it
affected radios and line telegraphs
in the vicinity. ,
"Aurorae are moderately frequent
'phenomena, there being about 100
of the brightersort observed per
year," said Professor Curtis. "They
are best seen further north, at lati-
tudes of 60 to 70 degrees north of
the equator, but are not very com-
mon at the latitude of Ann Arbor.
This one Sunday night was of un-
usual brilliance for this latitude,
however. It has been found that
they are more frequent at a time
of sun spot maximum; that is, every
11 years.
"The average height of the bands
and streaks of \an aurora ranges
from 50 to 250 miles above the sur-
face of the earth. A few have been
observed at muc' greater heights
up to 600 miles.
"Although their precise cause is
still somewhat in doubt," Professor
Curtis declared, "they certainly are
caused by some action of the sun,
in connection with the fact that
the earth is a great magnet; such
appearances are alwaysbrighter
and more common near 'the mag-
netic poles of the earth. They have
f been attributed with some prob-
ability to streams of Alpha-rays
shot out from the sun and causing
electrical action and luminescence
in the uppermost, extremely rare
regions of the atmosphere, of the
earth."
r ._
Ogden Links Record Broken.
OGDEN, Utah, (A)-The record of
4 the El Monte golf course here was
broken during a windy day by John.
Geertsen, professional, when he
carded a 32 for a par 37 nine-hole
course. lie had previously, held~
the record 34, which was made last
year.

Robinson Introduces
University Play Book
(Continued from rage 1)
the theatre is counl)g back differ-
ently."
It is through the American col-
leges and umv'eirsitics, to which the
townspeople are beginning tj look
for their dramatic enterfnrncit
that Mr. Robinson sees the rettin
of the Amcricarn Iheatre.
"These imiversities, eoilews, amd
normal s lthools," Says Mr. flobit o.,
"are making for Ihemiselves beno1 -
fully equipped theatres. Th C' are
beginning to create their owni plays
and players; 1 hey are begiajing to
bring in outside talent likc the Irish
Players. . . . The heatre hich is
coming back will be. meybe, more
limited in its appeal then was the
theatre of twenty years ge. but it
will be a hundred tms~ar n
tfligent." ,
It was witA the founding of the
"little" theatres, says Mr. Robin-
son, "that young American drama-
tists began to learn how to write
real American plays. Thgy learned
not to be afraid to write. about poor
people; not to be afraid of accent
and dialect; learned that the mat-
erials of the American play were
the sticks and stones lying outside
the American door."
Of the plays in the present
volume Mr. Robinson writes: "I
cannot resist praising the high
technical qualities that shine out in
every play. All of these plays have
interested me and one or two have
moved me deeply. . . Thse ten
plays, at any rate, are entirely
American; they could be written
only by Americans and be / ade-
quately acted only by Americans."
In conclusion Mr. Robinson
states: "I know that through uni-
versities and colleges the theatre is
returning and I know of no univer-
sity in which more significant work
's being done than in the University
fMichigan."

p~HI~
COLUM LCOLUM
CL0SECLOSE
AT 3 P.M. ADVERTISING AT 3 P.M.

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