100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 18, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

j TFHE MICHIGAN

DAILY

SUNDAY,

DAILY SUNDAY,

WILL OPEN
,AL PROGRAMi

Called by Mexico-

4A M'Cormack to Appear for
-Fwrh Time on Choral
U'ion Series.
RCHESTRA WILL PLAY
A Gab iowitsch to Present
bano Seections; Revelers,
Russia* Chorus to Sing.
'he fifty third annual series of
oral Union concerts maintained
the University Musical society,
. begin Wednesday evening when
in Mccormick, noted Irish tenor,
1 present a program of songs.
'his will be the fourth time Mc-
nick has sung on the Choral
ion series and it is expected that
will present a program of ex-)
ding interest to Ann Arbor pat-I
s.
ppearing for the first time in a
ri a decade, the Boston Sym-
fny orchestra with Serge Kous-
itsky, Russian conductor, at its
ad will present a concert October
This concert will b one of the
r the Boston orchestra has
eduled for cities in the middle
st and will mark the first time
ussevitsky has appearedoutside
Boston at the head of the organ-
tion.
Gabriliowltsch Coming.
L*he third concert will bring Os-
abilowitsch, pianist and di-f
Ator of the Detroit Symphony or-
estra, who is scheduled to pre-
it a piano recital Nov. 17. Gab-
Owitsch will also appear on Dec.
to lead the Detroit orchestra in
Wneert.
n Ann Arbor debut, the concert
Lich the Revelers will give, will
ce place Dec. 3. They have been
,red in the place of John
arles Thomas who is unable to
pear. The Revelers are well
own to radio fans and have done
cording for the Victor company.
Returning for the second time in
o years, the Don Cossack Russian
orus will give a program on Jan.
.Serge Jaroff is the conductor.
4lowing that concert, Dr. Ru-
iph Siegel, German composer-
pdvctor, will lead the Detroit
aphony in the third symphony
ncert of the year, Jan. 25.
Meuhin iere Feb. 4.
Yehudi Menuhin, youthful boy-
>linist who is adjudged one of
e finst of the age, will present
concrt Feb.4 This will 'also be
debut before Ann Arbor patrons.
'he ninth concert, Feb. 19, will
a Percy Grainger, famous Aus-
an-American pianist who ap-
ared here last year, in a recital.
Rosa Pnselle, leading soprano
th the Metropolitan Opera com-
ny, will give the tenth and last
ancert Marc 7.
*illiam Kearns Heads
ar~by Page Delegation
pIeaded by William Kearns, '32,
evident of the Student Christian
30ciatior, a delegation of students
>n the University will attend the
rby Page conference, to be held
ast Lansing, Oct. 23 to 25.
rhe conference is being conduct-
in an effort to aid the student
solving his more urgent religious
blems. An attempt will be made
co-ordinate religion and the
1 aprder.
#irby Page, who will lead in the
ieussions, is editor of "The World
morrow," a well known publica-

SAMMY SQUIRT: STUMlP THE LEADER
Gswz cR,! TC:cou-Loot-tr
MTS REoRCa- '-/pt a_ .4R t 7ry:
'TELL. HE 'TO WRI)~TE p'OOTE so S
'YOU ki 4A Ne 74 EMD- q OF/ EH E K
OUT W ~e t rs SC~AooL ISCHCOL I
rrI T1tU{T - ,tJ I -'
DO N Y ___ & 5'!
TOUCH7 /
I. r
k.L Sc
SNAG.
SGDA /'LS

er 1 VIt.4GDVFF1CULTIES-
- -~-QC of
FL.L
- asmtTME n4T 0t

I _L
I..

By Li4
-THE 'Re.
C '

I

' '

--
.r

t_ E
- - --
_= _ ----
1
,
.

HOOVER DEMANDS
BUDGET CONOMYl

Frat

nce Desirous of Peace
With Italy, Says Slosson s
wants peace with Italy, withdrawing from diplomatic sup- A
restlessness, dissatisfac- port of Frapce and cultivating
ambition of the Italians friendlier relations with Germany,
new problem on the Med- Austria, Hungary, and Russia. Not -
n, declared Prof. Preston, so Mussolini.

THIS 'THIS m
OLUMN A S I COLULSEN
ILOSES .D E rE
P.M. ADVERTI SING AT S Pi

Wants
in

Help of Public Opinion
Enforcing Proposed
Expense Cuts.

France
but the
tion, and
creates a
iterranear

NOTICE

Former President Plutarco Elias
Calles emerged as the dominant
figure in the Mexican government
again following the resignation of
the cabinet. He was appointed to
the post of minister of war by pres-
ident Rubio.
TIO GRID GAMES SET
Radio-Equipped Coaches Ready
for Students Going to
Princeton, Urbana.
With both the team and student
body expecting a change of luck;
on foreign gridirons for the next
two Saturdays at Illinois and at
Princeton successively, plans are!
now being made for a considerable
student exodus for the two week-
ends.
The newest wrinkle 'in special
transportation for the games has
just been announced by the Grey
hound Lines in the form of radio-
equipped parlor club coaches, with,
playing cards and refreshments en
route in addition to the new radio
equipment.
Two trips of this nature were an-
nounced at the Union-one leavingI
Friday noon to arrive early in the
evening at Champaign, and the
other leaving a week from Thurs-
day for the Princeton intersectionall
battle, stopping over in New York
City all day Friday and continuing
on to Princeton Saturday morning.
Special railroad service will in-
clude an Illinois train leaving Fri-
day night and returning immedi-
ately after the game; Princeton
train service wil be only as far as
New York, with individual arrange-
ments necessary from there on.
Yale-Chicago Football
Fans See Giant Akron
STAGG. FIELD, CHICAGO, Oct.
17.-(RP)-The giant airship Akron
greeted the 35,000 spectators at-
tending the Yale-Chicago football
game this afterncon. The air liner
sailed over the University of Chi-
cago campus .on its trip eastward
at 1:45 p. m.

WASHINGTON, Oct. 17. - (A) -
President Hoover plans to lay be-
fore congress a 1933 budget stripped
of every "cent consonant with the
obligations of the ,government."
In an effort to bring expenditures
and revenues into closer relation-
ship he has demanded that every
principal government officer revise
downward estimates for the next
fiscal year. Meritorious and un-
meritous projects alike are to be
shelved.
He has also asked the aid of pub-
lic opinion in support of "drastic
economies."
Standing Friday before a group
of newspaper men gathered for his
regular conference with the press,
Mr. Hoover said.
"In times when the income of
the people is reduced and when
taxes or loans may stifle economic
recovery there is only one coursef
of sound fiscal policy, and that is
to reduce the expenditures 6f the
government to the last cent con-
sonant with the obligations of the
government."
Has Treasury's Report.
Before him, the president had'
the statement of the treasury show-
ing a deficit for the first three
months of the present fiscal year
since July 1 totaling $502,106,600.
This is approximately $485,000,000
more than it was for the same
period of last year, when the twelve
months deficiency amounted to very
nearly a billion dollars.
Departing from his prepared
statement, the president injected a
belief that improved conditions
were in the offing. He said it was
difficult to estimate now for ex-
penditures to be made after next
July 1, when better times could be
expected.
Many had believed that Mr.
Hoover would discuss at his con-
ference the recent and much-dis-
cussed slash in the navy's budget
estimate. But he gave it but pass-
ing attention as he said similar cuts
were being studied in every govern-
mental department. No conclusions
are to be reached finally until the
budget goes to congress.
Two Great Difficulties.
Two great difficulties, he held,
balk his program of reduced ex-
penditures.
"We must meet interest payments
on the statutory redemption*of the
pi41lic debt," he said, "we must
pay *allowances and pensions to
veterans and pensions to civil serv-
ants, etc. Thus over two billion of
the federal budget is in fixed obli-
gations, and such reductions as we
can bring about must need be con-
centrated on less than half of the
budget."

WV. Slosson of the history depart-
ment last night, in a radio talk
over station WJR.
The Mediterranean question be-
tween France and Italy started
during the peace settlement after
the World War, according to Pro-
fessor Slosson.
"Italy emerged from the peace
conference considerably ruffled,"
he said. "President Wilson would
not permit the annexation of
Fiume by the Italians, nor would
he permit sweeping annexations in
the former Austrian provinces of
Istria and Dalmatia.
"When the French secretly sup-
ported President Wilson's plan, the
Italians became somewhat alarmed
to think that their fellow Latins
should fail them. Furthermore,
Italy objected to the French sup-
porting the enormous gains of ter-
ritory by smaller countries who
played a relatively minor part in
the war, while Italy had to be con-
tent with comparatively little.
"These vague national discon-
tents might have found no focus
if Mussolini and his Fascists hads
not seized power in Italy, Profes-
sor Slosson continued. "Italian lib-
erals of the old school, such as
Nitti and Giolitti were content to
rebuke France in a negative way by

"The coming of Fascism meant
the assertion of Italian national-
ism," according to Professor Slos-
son. "Italy was to be recognized as
a great power on a full basis of
equality witheEngland or France.
In particular, the Mediterranean
should not be dominated by any
foreign power.
Mussolini is not contemplating
war with France, in the opinion of
Professor Slosson. He is undoub-
tedly aware of the fact that in a
present conflict the odds would all
be against Italy, he said.
"His aim appears to be to create
an army and navy that will be re-
spected by all other Powers and
then to use it as a threat more
than as a w.pon to compel the
recognition of Italy's colonial am-
bitions," Professor Slosson stated.
"The whole situation is highly
embarrassing f o r France. The
French are well satisfied with the
present situation, and ask for noth-
ing better than peace. But with
the Italians looking for provinces,
France must be on the lookout.
"Although France has the advan-
tage at present due to a superior
wealth and presumably superior
military, Italy may in the future
join with Germany, Hungary, or
another country and be able to
meet France with equal forces."

The Ideal Does It Best
IDEAL LAUNDRY
Formerly Moe Laundry
204 N. Main St. Phone 3916

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Remington portable
typewriter. Used one semester-
ingood condition. Bargain.
Cal Univ. Ex. 353 174
FOR SALE-Paw Paw grapes, grape

malt. Call 9534 or 22413. 173

MASONIC TEMPLE available for
luncheons, dinners and dances.
Washed air ventilating. Good
food. Reasonable terms. Phone
22398. 175
WALKER IOME LAUNDRY-Stu-
dent laundry a specialty. Terms.
Very reasonable. Dial 4776. We
call for and deliver. 85

WANTED

WANTED-Student washing done
in private home below laundry
prices. Called for and delivered.
Dial 4929. 162
WANTED-A furnace to tend by
experienced graduate student.
Phone 9587. 169
LOST
LOST-White gold fine chain with
crystal pendant. Reward. Call
7129. 170

FOR RENT

FOR RENT-Nice suite and single
room. Close to campus at re-
duced price. 425 South Division.
Phone 22352. 166
WARM-Clean, single room at rea-
sonable price. Dial 7618. 515
Walnut. 161
FURNISHED APARTMENT-3
rooms and bath; steam heat;
frigidaire; near campus. 419
North State. Dial 5380. 146
FOR RENT-Furnished apartment
with private bath and shower.
Also single room. Steam heat,
shower, garage. Dial 8544. 422
E. Washington. 1681
FOR RENT-Large pleasant single
room on first floor, $3.50. 324 E.
Jefferson. Call 5024. 11

LOST-Red Chow dog.
ward. Mich. Daily.

Liberal re-
Box 2.

110
FOUND
ANY intelligent person may earn
good income corresponding for
newspapers; all or spare time;
no canvasing; send for free book-
let; tells how. Heacock, 410 Dun
Bldg., Buffalo, N...Y. 50
WANT ADS PAY

THIRD CLAIMANT FURTHER INVOLVES
LOUISIANA'S GOVERNORSHIP TANGLE

Cyr Confers With Attorney
Suit to Oust Huey Long
From His Office.

on

NEW ORLEANS, La., Oct. 17.--()
-The cast of what Gov. and Sena-
tor-elect Huey P. Long calls Louisi-
ana's "'political comedy" is growing
more extensive and more confused.
Involved in the turmoil today
were three claimants to the job of
governor, three to that of lieuten-
ant-governor and two to that of
senator.
The leader in the gubernatorial
insurrection, Dr. Paul M. Cyr, was
in New Orleans today to confer with
his attorney on the ouster suit he
said he would file to get the gover-
nor's job.
Early this week, Cyr, who was
elected lieutenant - governor when
Long became governor, voluntarily
took the oath of office of governor
and demanded that Long turn over
the executive chair to him. He said
Long's election to the United States
Senate vacated the governorship.,
The governor refused, declaring
that Cyr, through his action, had

vacated the office of lieutenant-
governor. Alvin O. King, president
pro tempore of the state senate,
took the lieutenant-governor's oath
and Long declared him on and Cyr
off the state payroll.
All this started an epidemic of
oath-taking. William L. Aldrich,
unemployed Shreveport - man, took
the governor's oath, declaring he,
too, was going to try to take over
the job. L. D. Smith, of Benton,
also unemployed, meanwhile pro-
ceeded to take the oath of office of
lieutenant-governor.
Joseph C. Land, unemployed con-
tractor of Shreveport, added the
final touch Friday by taking the
oath of office of United States sen-
ator, after declaring -that office, to
which Long recently was elected,
was vacant.

Saddle"Horses
Mullison SaddleStbe
326 East Ann and Fair Grounds
Saturday Night Supper R ide
Start at 4:30, a 2 hour ride and

fireplace supper.
CALL US AND ENGAGE YOUR
PHONE 7418

HORSES

WE

own" r

i e Manila censorship
an average 20,000 feet
>f every 600,000 feet of
res reviewed.

What MON1

:Y BUSINESS is tkis?

board
of film
motion

For Your Fall Shruberry and Lawns
Imported Granulated
PEAT MOSS
ALSO
DRICONURE-VIGORO-VERT
BONE MEAL-SULPHATE OF AMMONIA
HERTLER BROS.
210 South Ashley Street
ALL KINDS OF LAWN SEED

WEUR TH
Starting
Today

Hist!

it

"Don't imve-don't speak! Not
a sound!; There's mystery here
and a spell that must not be
broken until...

-MAJESTIC

It's
The

"Watch Closclyt It is-

TODAY 1:30-11:00 P. M.

Ann Harding

All
Seats
40c

IN

The SPIDER
,wt Edmund Lowe
Lois Moran
EL BRENDEL " GEORGE E. STONE
R~oman~ce of the theatre with
thr iUs ai m agic

All
Seats
40c

I

Four Marx Bros.
ZEPPO - HARPO - GROUCHO - CHICO
'MONKEY BUSINESS'

"DEVOTION"
iA.xv A V 1TlT%

II

I

"WEDGEPLA"r -P1 ro- crvpvr t-

t'PTC'TCUT AT..

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan