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January 25, 1931 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-25

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r

PAGE TWOe
Sphinx Members

T H FM I C H ITCAN AI

-- SUTTTDAY, 'TANX5T.Y2 ,T73

Noted

for

Distinctionin

Campus Activities

FOUDED27Y EARS
AGO FOH JUNIOR
Backcd Union Honor System and
Participated in Many Other
Activities in Past.
HOLD TWO INITIATIONS
Many Faculty Members Included
in Honorary Roster; Alumni.
Are Well Known.
Twenty-seven years ago, several
members of the class of 1903 de-
cided that it was time the Univer-
sity of Michigan had a Junior Lit-
erary Honor society comparable to
the recently originated Michigamua.
The purpose was to be for the ad-
vancement of Michigan, and the
furtherance of honiir and well-be-
ing among members of the junior
class. Thus came Sphinx into the
world-the continuous existence of
which has made its mark in Uni-
versity life.
Each year in May, as soon as ap-
pointments are out and the next
year's work begun in earnest, the
old Sphinxes hold their solemn
meeting and decide to whom shall
fall the honor of perpetuating the
tradition of the famous organiza-
tion. Ten men are chosen from the
sophomore class-10 men whose ac-
tivity has stamped them as lead-
ers in their group. The 10 are
warned at midnight two days be-
fore initiation and are collected on
- the traditional dray for the cere-
monies. As soon as the initiation
banquet is over, these 10 newcomers
are left all to themselves, the old
Sphinexs automatically become in-
active, and the destinies of the fu-
ture junior class lie within the 20
new hands for moulding. With the
resumption of school the next fall
the 10 Sphinxes meet for the elec-
tion of 10 more juniors whose ac-
tiiy congeniality, and worth has
been outstanding. The 20 men con-
tinue to rule the junior literary
class until May when a new group
begins all over again.
Accident Occurred in 1926.
Sphinx got into trouble four
years ago and had to keep itself
very much to itself for one year.
Campus initiations were barred,
and activity of any public nature
was forbidden. All this was the re-
sult of an unfo iu1att eident
during. th~e winter initiation of
192b whii one of the neophyte's
wrists was severely burned with
water thought to be luke-warm but
in reality beyond the boiling point.
Sphinx came back again the fol-
lowing year and has since continu-
ed its public initiations every May
and December.
{ittle is ever known about the ac-
tivities of this honor society be-
cause no publicity is given it-pur-
posely. The Union honor system,
the stunt card section this fall,
charity drives, and hundreds of
other activities have occupied the,
time of its members, although not
so much as a line of credit has
been given, nor has it been sought.
Members Are Prominent.
Sphinx has on its roster at the
present time a representative from
just about every major organiza-
tion and activity on campus, a fact
which gives it a much greater scope
than many honor groups now poss-
ess. Good fellowship, leadership in
the activities of the junior of the
junior class, are its primary objec-
tives. Among its alumni of recent

years are Bennie Oosterbaan, Ken-
Complete Line of f
THE MATCHLES;
VICTOR, MAJ
UNEIdXCELLED M
UNIVE
MUSIC]
William Wad
Devoted t
Cor. Maynard
Phone

ELIHU ROOT APPEARS BEFORE GROUP
IN SENATE AS AID TO WORLD COURT

I ST. LOU S S CKKappa Tax Alpha
P OF fLL\ LBROKERIIAP T Becomes TOtTALK
Honorary D iety

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Elihu Root, 86-year-old jurist and statesman, shown when he ap-
peared as a witness before the world court hearing conducted by the
senate foreign relations committee in Washington. He explained and
defended the revised protocol for American adherence to the world
court which he helped to draft.

I1 UUL UU IINL---
)fficials May Investigate Sale
of Juices Planned for Home
Beverage Manufacture.
(3 Associated Prrss
WASHINGTON, Jan. 24.-Pushed
t lwardi by the suggestions of the
icxshC1" 0o t, the question ofI
cs ible Government action with
he sales of grape concentrates
,hich are easily converted into
vine again today was before gov-
irnmvnt ofilcials.
The gran cconcen'at' sles were
layed in the law enfrorement com-
nission's report with the assertion
hev are conduet,'d "on a large I
cale with federal aid." A sugges-
ion was made for an amendment
>f the Volstead act to curb this ac-
ivity.
"Why it should be penal to make
wine commercially for use in homes
and not penal to make in huge
quantities the material for wine-
naking and set up an elaborate
selling campaign for disposing of1
them," the report asserted, "is not(
easily apparent."l
Nevertheless, there appeared lit-
tle possibility today of immediate,
concerted federal action in this di-
rection. Both prohibition chiefs
and Attorney General Mitchell
maintained the strict silence in
connection with grape concentrate'
matters that has been their policy
in recent months.
Several weeks ago the attorney
general indicated the justice de-
partment might make a statement
to clarify the government's stand.
This has not yet been done. Pro-
hibition Director Woodcock like-
wise has maintained silence, saying
only that if sales campaigns show
"intent" to violate the prohibition
law they will be acted against.
In connection with recent arrest
of grape concentrate salesmen,
Woodcock announced this had been
done entirely on the initiative of
local dry agents and not upon or-
ders from Washington.
RADIO TODAY.
Dr. Howard Y. McClusky, of
the school of education, will
speak from 5 to 5:30 o'clock this
afternoon over Station WJR,
broadcasting from the Univer-
sity studio. This is the regular
Sunday afternoon program of
the university and is addressed
to the Michigan Congress of Par-
ents and Teachers.
Dr. McClusky's subject will be
"Problems of Adolescence."
George Poinar, violinist, will
present the musical program.

c
k rol*
C
7
i

Louis Hoey, '31E, Dies
at St. Joseph's Hospital
Louis C. Hoey, '31E, died Friday
night, following a prolonged illness,
at St. Joseph's Mercy hospital. He
was the son of Mr. and Mrs. John
Hoey of Dexter.
Hoey was- an honor student in
the engineering college, having re-
ceived the Robert Campbell Gem-

National organization of Kappa
Tau Alpha, honorary journalistic Dr. Friedgood of Medical School
raternity, which previously existed I to Speak Tuesday; Librarian
as a league -of independent societies to Discuss Bi-Centennial.
f the same name. was announced -
yesterday by Prof. John L. Brumm, Prof. Howard Y. McClu.sky of the
0f the jouina sm department, who school of education will open the
?.IT a namcd a member of the radio program for the week at 5
boatd f goveriors of the national o'clock this afternoon with a talk
oiganization. on "Problems of Adolescence." He
The first Kap";a Tau Alpha soci- will speak from the University
cty was organized in 1909 at the studio broadcasting through WJR.

IS FR0U SUBJECT
Poole Will Tutor Geology Group
for Freshmen Tonight
in Lane Hall.

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Snrei e; ryo f Mis u. . Each year, George Poinar, violinist, will pre-
corresponding societies were formed G th msa
at'thrLolegs ndunvsiie, sent the musical program of the
wth view toward future analga- afternoon.
mation after the societies had been The Michigan University of fiWe
independently started at the coun- Air, which is broadcast each Sun-
try's leading schools of journalism. day, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
gaiization of th Kappa Tau Alpha sent on its program for tomorrow
z societics will mai k a new era in the Dr. Harry Friedgood of the depart-
<:"" histoi'y of the fraternity, Robert S. ment of internal medicine of the
A ssocia ted Press Photo M :.iiei d, Grad., president of the University Hospital. The subject
local chapter, said yesterday. for his speech will be, "The R Je
Arthur C. Hiimer, ranking part- Played by Heredity in Old Age and
ncr in the brokerage house of Lor-1 Disease." Charles B. Ruegnitz, bar-
enzo Anderson and company, and !Forestry Proressor itone, assisted by Burnette Brad-
pies cient of the St. Louis stock ex- Gitnaste byBrteBrd
chage, wose r Lhas b e Goes on Lecture Tour ley at the piano will furnish the
change,wsirm hasbeen sus- musical interims.
pended by the New York and St. Prof. S. W. Allen, of the School l "The Significance of the Wash-
Louis exchanges. A receivership of Forestry a n d Conservation, ington Bi-Centennial" is the title
was ordered, of the talk to be given by Ran-
-dolph G. Adams, Custodian of the
lectures for the University exten- ( William L. Clements library on the
sion division under the auspices of
sinTghmCutySholSpr Tuesday afternoon program. Ray-
the Ingham County School Super- mond Morin, staff pianist, will pre-
intendents Round Table. Professorf sent the music .on this occasion:.
I Prof. David E. Patton of the
Allen will deliver addresses at pub- school of Music will feature the
Ile schools in 10 different towns on Wednesday program. His subject
N . .A "Making the Most of Our Natural will be "The Dawn of the Civic
otian, Resources." Jan. 26, Professor Allen Opera." The vocalist on this pro-
Ccmmittee Studies Reports will visit Stocbridge, Dansvile, gram will be Sidney Straight ten-
of Unfair Practises. or.
iWebbeiville, Williamston, and Oke- Thursday afternoon Ethel Mc-
(Nv A.lss,,ciated lPress) mos, and on Jan. 27, he will speak Cormick, assistant professor of
LINCOLN, Neb., Jan. 24. - Two in Haslett, Bath, Diamondale, Holt, physical education for women, will
LILNeb., aReJ an le4.-wE and Leslie. discuss the topic 'Leisure Time Ac-
Nebraskans, one a Pepublican lead- - ----- tivities." Popular songs will be
er, were under indictment for per- F"e of SevenP a sung by the Midnite quartet.
jury today as a result of the United On Saturday evening at 7:30
States Senate's campaign funds in- Not Guilty to Court o'clock Dr. Udo Wile of the depart-
vestigation in this state. Five of sevenrspondents who mentub ecDermatology ierl speak on
A Federal grand jury true bill appeared before Judge George W. namely "Athletes Foot." Hereward
named Victor Seymour, of Lincoln, Sample in circuit court yesterday T. Pierce of the English depart-
former manager of the western morning entered pleas of not guilty. ment will talk on "Elizabethean
headquarters of the Republican Na- One was placed on probation, and Shorthand."
tional Senatorial Campaign Coin- another, a girl remanded to the-________________
mittee, at Denver, on eight counts. custody'ofr, gr premnded.th-
Another true bill returned two of her parents
counts against George W. Norris, a
grocer, formerly located at Broken
Bow, Neb., who sought a place on ,B IU"HT S O
the' Republican primary ballot last 802 Packard
August as an opponent to Senator50 o 7 00
George W. Norris. TODAY
The indictment of Seymour was 50cD
based on his testimony before the XP R pec c inner
Senate Campaign Funds Commit- Fried Chicken, Country
tee, headed by Senator Gerald P. Style with Hot Biscuits
Nye, which last summer sought the R NA I'K NMashed Potatoes and Fruit
sources of the financing of the pri- R E R Gs
mary campaign against Senator Salad
Norris. SPECIAL 35c DINNER
Seymour told the committee he HALL ER'S Roast Leg of Lamb, Mint Jelly
had not taken an active interest in Roast Loin of Pork with Apple
the Nebraska senatorial campaign State Street Jewelers Sauce
Mashed Potatoes and Fruit Salad
and that he had no knowledge ofWEDLVR HNE84
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read of it in the papers.__
_-&-

i

mell scholarship during his sopho- D
more year and the Cornelius Don- Direction of a tutoring section
ovan scholarship in his junior year. and an open forum will occupy the,
He was a member of the Glider attention of committeemen of the
section. Student Christian association to-
Funeral services will be held in
St. Joseph's church, Dexter, at 10:30 day. The tutoring section, open free
o'clock tomorrow morning. Two of charge to all freshman, is being
students, Ivan Stauthton, '31E, and conducted by the freshman com-
Donald Palmer, '31E, will be among mittee, while the discussion hasI
the pall bearers. -been arranged by the International
chairman.
neth Patrick, Ellis B. Merry, Bennie ' Dr. Francis S. Onderdonk, of the
Friedman, and a host of others, school of architecture, will lead the I
noted for their prowess in campus open forum on the subject, "How
To End War." He will base his talk
activity during their school ca- on adventures experienced as an
reers and now making a name for alien American in Austria during
Michigan outside of the scholastic the World war. Principles of thej
realms. Sphinx honorary members organization of war resisters inter-
national, of which he is a member,
are Wilbur R. Humphreys, Robert will be pronounced in his informal
A. Campbell, Waldo M. Abbot, lecture.
Henry C. Carver, Charles B. Vib- John C. Poole, '32, will lead the
bert, John A. C. Hildner, Charles R. utoring section in beginning geol-
og., 't 7:30 o'clock tonight in Lane
Wagner, and Franklin C. Cappon. han. Other groups that will meet
Officers of Sphinx are elected preparatory to examinations are
twice each year; once immediately beginning Spanish at 7:30 o'clock
after the May initiations, and a- Tuesday under the direction of
gain in December after the remain- IHirsch Hootkios, of the department
of French, and History 11 some
ing ten men have been selected. 1evening later in. the week, to be
Those chosen during the first elec- announced by postcard. Sidney
tion of the present group were Glazer, instructor in the history de-
Richard Tobin, Pharaoh, or presi- partment, will tutor the History
dent; Joseph Gates, vice president; group. A session in Chemistry 3
Charles Kline, secretary, and Fred- will be held at 7:30 o'clock Monday
erick Brace, treasurer. The elec- night,
tions following the recent initiation -
picked Tobin as Pharaoh, MaynardC
Morrison, v i c e president, Colby
Ryan, secretary, and Joseph Gates,
treasurer. These elections will be
terminated with the initiation of
10 new men from the class of 1933
in May. "THRIE FULL

Two More Candidates
File Names for O irc<
Two candidates filed nominating
petitions with the city clerk yes-
terday as the last day for filing pe-
titions--Thursday--drew near.
The petitions were those c
Guernsey P. Collins, Republican
who announced his candidacy a
supervisor from the First War
and Redmond M. Burr, Republican
seeking election to the city counc
from the first ward.
1. ... '...W..

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sro affirm ¬ęse .en. I

Everything Mus
SS BALDWIN LINE OFI
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MARTIN BAND INSTRU

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Continuous Shews 1:30-11:00 p. m.
Honor Thy Father
Even If You Don't
I Know Him!
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