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January 23, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THF.' MTrRTr. A N

T)ATT- V

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1T I -.F M ~ T ~ A Ph . L iI L TT 1 12LrS2T1hVTMTD ) ~ .*A.

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1

History

A*"W4b&

Group

Started

as

Satire

Organization

IMICKED ACTORS,
OFFICIALS IN FIRST
ST AG E FE RINGS
Made Theatre Out of Union's
Annex by Lowering
Dance Floor.
BEGUN IN FALL OF 1911
Achieved NaTonal Fame When
Cotton Stockings' Played
in New York.
By Beach Conger, Jr., '32.

Fourth Annual Union Opera, 'Crimson Chest', Boasted
Cast n CI oruses Equal to Subsequent Productions

. .
1. - -- _ _ --- -

I

ANN ARBORNEWS-BRIEFS

II

City Health Officials

,Ford ,t. rage in Milan, where Krel-

i ,

"Mimes, to most graduates o
Michigan, suggests one thing and
only one thing-the Union Opera,'
once wrote Prof. O. J. Campbell, 1
the English department. Yet baci
in the dark age;: - he fall of 1911
to be exact, when <.groun of pro-
minent member o1 heocast of one
of the Union cp,'a; or'ganized a
dramatic cluo, they little dreamed
that their organization would some
day produce the annual Michigan
opera, as it came to be inown, in
the New York Metropolitan Opera
house.
The students who founded the
club were interested in the promo-
tion of campus dramatics, and the
organization flourished from the
beginning. The members confined
their productions to impersonations
of prominent actors, public offi-
cials and whomever else had the
misfortune to be in the public eye.
Their mimicries of popular situa-
tions were, according to critics,"so
droll and popular" that they
changed their name from the Opera
club to the Myimes, which title the
organization bears today.
N chgenda Presented in 1908.
The opera, so closely connected
with Mimes, was first presented in
1908, when "Michigenda," by Donal
H. Ilaines, now in the journalism
department, was staged at the
Whitney theatre. For the first few
years, Mimes contented itself with
vaudeville acts, the mimicries of
prominent people, and a few small
play. But in 1913 the staging of
"Contrarie Mary" was given over to
Mimes, in whose hands the produc-
tion of operas continued until last
year. "Contrarie Mary" was the first
opera to go on the road, and made
an unarrmbitious tour of several
Michigan cities.
Until 191, the Opera had been a
strictly ai-miale show. But in that
year, due perhaps to the World war,
women were for the first and only
time, given parts in the cast, until
the staging of the first All-Campus
Revue last winter.a s
The year 1919 was marked byl
another milestone in Mimes history,
for it was in that year that E. Mor-
timer Shuter assumed his duties as
dramatic director of the Union, a
position he held until the discon-
tinuation of the opera last year.
Make Annex into Theatre.
Fred Rebman, for five years
master-carpenter for Mimes, tells
the story of how the former Union
annex was made into the theatre.
The main part of the building had
been used for a ballroom, while a
cafeteria had operated in the base-
ment. Shuter conceived the idea of
cutting through one end of the
floor of the ballroom and letting it
down five or six feet to make the
slope necessary for the theatre.
Carpenters, advisors and experts
told him it couldn't be done-that
the floor would break off at the
other end. However, Mimes needed
a theatre, and undaunted, Mr.
Shuter went ahead. And to the
amazement of all, he was success-
ful and Mimes at last had its own
theatre.
"Make It For Two" was the first
show to make an extensive tour,
playing at Chicago, Toledo, Cin-
cinnati, Lima and Indianapolis out-
side the state in 1922, and when
"Cotton Stockings" played to a
packed house in the Metropolitan
Opera house in New York the fol-
lowing year, the Mimes opera had
achieved a national reputation.
Natumally, with a theatre and
fll-time director, Mimes did not
content itself with the lone annual
proud, tion. Some of the shows
N:,Jich were successes in the early
1NI VITATIONS
AND
PERSONAL CARDS
PRINTED
Long years of experience
Dependable Service
A Red Arrow Place

o. D. MORRILL!

f
,>
f
i
i
a
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_

Wil Lift Quarantines ker it employed, to notify his em-
ployers of his condition.
Quarantines on several residences - - - --
where scarlet fever is reported, will 'focials to Discuss
be lifted within the next few days, Co-n -issio;Inquiry
Dr. John Wessinger city health offi-
cer, said last niht.sion of the
No new cases of scarlet fever have procedure to be lm ylo d in the
been reported wthmi the Past p4
hours. The total number of cases proposed investigation of the Wash-
to date is 14, inchilding two located tenaw county board of supervisors
outside the city limits. I into alleged irregularities of the
Classes in the first three grades board of road commissioners will
at St. Thomas Catholic sdhcol, Will be made this afternoon at a super-
be resumed 6onday, it was said visors meeting
yesterday. Theso classes were dis-
misscd last Monday by Catholic 'rhe meeting was called last week
school authoriti'es, who said the when 10 members of -the board of
action had been taken as a "pi6_ supervisors signed a petition re-
cautionary nmasur'." Ioildny will questing an investigation into the
also mark the bginmihn of the commisisoner's road commissioners.
socond semnester at the St. Thomas At least a half-dosen of the super-
school, visors, who are from Ann Arbor,
S- --signed the petition.
Auto Driver Suffers Today's discussion will include
A o rf .only the outlining of a definite form
Stroke of Padlysis of procedure, Emmett Gibb, Super-
- --ior township supervisor said. No
While he was driving his car other business matter will come up
on S. State street yesterday morn- for discussion.
ing, L. L. Krelker, of Milan, Mich., - - -- -
suffered a paralytic stroke, accord- More than 1,000 miles of high-
ing to police reports, ways have been paved in South
Officers who took Krelker to St. Carolina under the state's $65,000,-
Joseph's Mercy hospital called the 000 road building program.

The above piclr tan in 1911, shows the cast and choruses of the fourth annual Michigan Union opera, "Crimson Chest," staged at
the Whitney theatr!. t was preeted in the same year that Mimes was founded, but that organization did not take over the production of the
annual shows until 1I' w hn "emie Mary" was stage . The Union opera so closely connected with the colorful career of Mimes, had its
inception with "Michigenda" in 1. 03.

I

years were Verhacren s'A UUhT YTAiC - E HISTORY
ter," Th e This 'cent _ Char"t , f slfI T RY IA
seventeenth-centrr c "Iregar- LIU dHU II OF BOOK BINDING IN UNIVERSITY
man," translated !
Campbelln Euene C .Hollands Presides Over Binding with the aid of only one assistant
Glenca5.rn," ..nd X. 3 Glets ! I tAUeLo' Several Thousands of for some time. During that period
famous burlesque "Engaged.' f e Ts the number of periodicals bound
Today the opera exists no more. ------Periodicals Yearly. reached 3,000 annually, and an ad-
In its place, Mimes plans to present Portraits by Leon A. Makielski dition to the staff was imminent.
yearly an All-Campus Revue, in Will be Displayed in "When is a book not a book" is At the present time, the University
Swhich both men and women are to the catchy title of this week's fea- bindery handles 20,000 each year
have parts. The day of extravagant Detroit Monday. I ture on the back cover of the Mich- and its quarters have been extend-
and lavish musical comedies has :--- igan Alumnus for January 24. Dr. ed greatly.
come and gone, as far as the Mich- Potraits. of numerous members Frank E. Robbins, propounder of "All the fascinating steps of the
igan campus is concerned. o the University faculty are fea- the features on the Alumnus covers delicate art of book-binding may be
-- - tured in the exhibition which Leon for several years, adds "for one followed in the University's bind-
ALUMNI PROGRAM I A. Makielski, Michigan artist, will thing, when it isn't bound." ery," the article continues, "and
oon Mend3ay, Jan. 26, at tie J. L. "'he University of Michigan re- not only the usual ones, but many
TO BE BROADCAST Huson studios in Detroit. His ex- Ceives 5,139 periodirals including unusual ones as well, for there is
hibition there will mark the com- 89 newspapers, each year, and be- great demand for special work of
Ruthven, Huber, and Lawton oletion io a tour, during which he lore these can be put in the library all kinds. Boxes have to be made
Iexhibjitcd in the leading galleries they must be bound," the article for rare books, or for pamphlets,
i Address Graduates. in th EaWt. states. "A great many other publi- frames and mounting for docu-
T~he port L~raits, which are rendered cetions come in unbound form. ments, and find bindings for rari-
An Alumni night program, ar- i Hece te inerrlcredinthttes
ranged by Waldo Abbot, director of n ch coa>, include those of Presi- Hencc, the bindery, located in the ties,
hs stu dnt A andtr G. Rthven; Dr.ybvment of the old library and its The feature concludes by stating
the University broadcasting studio - x.,cm G Rtve; r.Y
of Station WJR, going on the air Garl G. iubr and Dr. Frederick G. present successor since March 1, that. "an unusual part of the work
at 7:30 o'clock next Saturday, will Novy, Of te medical faculty; Prof. 1896. It has been presided over by is the making and binding of
be addressed to the 75,000 gradu- WihYm H. hobbs, of the geology William C. Hollands ever since that photostats. In this way unique
beadresseh U t.the pr,000grand artmnt;DanJhn.time, and is, incidentally, the first manuscripts, costly old books, and
ates of the University.,'ihe proram jdepartme nt: Dean John R. Effinger,,
will last an hour. of the literary college; the late Prof. shop to be set up in connection with whole volumes of rare old news-
Sa oClaude van Tyne, of the history de- the library as of learning." papers have been made available
J. Fred Lawton, who w ote the partnment; Dr. Louis Strauss, of the The article continues that Mr. for the use of students and faculty
lyrics for "Varsity" and wlo has Engrlish de'eatment; Prof. Jesse S. Hollands did all the work himself here and elsewhere."
been a speaker at numerous m ot- i -- __________ __
a pep eetings, wl act Reeves, of the political science 'de- -
pep eetngswillactas ^ ip:,rtai ot: Dr. Warren P. Lombard,
announcer for the occasion. uhn; ipar faculty;Lean Her- FRATERNITY JEWELRY PARTY FAVORS
iPresident Alexander G. Ruthiven; LtC.Sde- f'h i itern
G. Carl Huber, dean of the Gracu- ' S rcanArRCAndJErs.iLawrnce
.o ac D.an rsARCece!AD JEVVELRY SHOP
ate school; T. Hawley Tapping, Geum f thv~e l,'elogy department.
general secretary of the Alumni lfe I CARL I. BAY
association, and Helen M. Gore, of O 1vrsov s of note whose pr-C
Benton Harbor, who is chairman of traiw e exhibited in the show- JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST
the Alumnae council, will give mi l a s Lyman Wilbur, Secre- Nickels Arcade
brief talks to the alumni of the tary of the Lierior, and Mrs. Wil- a
Middle W est. ? bur, Nicholas L. .;worth, Speaker --________--
All music being presented on this Of e house of Representatives, -__
program consists of songs and Frank Murlny, Mayor or Detroit;
I music characteristic of the Michi- Edoa' Guest and Robert Frost,
gan campus. The Midnite Sons poet. .a'nd Al Watrous, golfer.
quartet and the Michigan League !Alo included in the exhibit will"
dance orchestra will furnish the be the Polish ambassador's portrait
musical entertainment. done in oie.0
Sunday, 4:15, Jan. 25--Mendelssohn Theatre
Wassiy Besekirsky-Hanns Pick-Joseph Brinkman
Violin Violoncello Piano
I No Admission Charge

i

;
,
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S
7
r
'
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Ho-for a Cutter Ride
JINGLE BELLS AND ALL
Bobs for Sleigh-ride Parties
Single Cutters (for two people)
Double Cutters (for four people, and we send the driver)
CALL
ullison Sa e Stbes

326 East Ann Street

Phone 7418

Phn~71

i

- -- - - -"-4-: :: zi

NOW
SHOWIN

G
THE WINDY CITY'S BIG BLOWOUT

2:00, 3:40
7:00, 9:00
ON
10"

ALICE
WHITLE

rI

NEIL

IN

"THE WIDOW FROM CHICAG

"Widows made while you wait" is the new racket now. And when this
widow steps into gangland-what a riot!
COMING SUNDAY
Wallace Beery-John Mack Brown
"BILLY THE KID"

_

t'

''1

f ____.

Daily at
2:00, 3:40

MAjESTIC

I

Daily at
7:00, 9:00

I CHAS. FAR

TODAY LAST TIMES -
RELL "The Princess and the
Plumber"

I

R

v

v

STARTING

SATURDAY

1
t
I
f

,
-

Tuesday, 8:15, Jan. 27-Hill Auditorium
American Violinist
IInChoral Union Series
Tickets: $1.00, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50
Monday, 8:15, Feb. 2-Hill Auditorium
PAUL ROBESON
Negro Baritone
In Choral Union Series
Tickets: $1.00, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50
Tuesday, 8:15, Feb. 10-Hill Auditorium
SERG__~bEI R AC2"HMANINOFF
Russian Pianist
In Choral Union Series
Tickets: $1.00, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50
l'I ii? 1 A 14r" T"' "~'l.

MARION
DAVIES
production

ir'li A VUnw 4-%

From
Hogan s
Alley, She
Crashed
Into
British
Society!

i

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Ii':f

From the
Belasco
State Hit

314

South State St.

Phone 6615

"N
~& .4'' N
~ ~-'2\
*KK~ ~-,'\
I
~ '~rfr N,

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BR IG Hr TSPOT
802 Packard Street
TODAY, 5:30 to 7:30
"~AK ED VIRGINIA HAM,
RAISIN SAUCE,
SWEET POTATOES.
ROAST BEEF,

with
RALPH FORBES
C. AUBREY SMITH
directed
ROBERT

I ~IN I

-o A IK7 u(.

I

LN

EXTRA ADDED

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