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January 23, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-23

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DAILY

FRIDAY, JANUARY 23,1931.

THE MICHIGAN

PAO7 THRM

livninrnTOflf'f~ BsiesstoPic U

C'IJCIL MEETING
1II BEGIN TODAY
Graduate Groups From Colleges
of Eight States Will be
Represented.
TAPPING WILL SPEAK

Interchange of Ideas on
Endeavor Stated as
of Conference.

Alumni
Aim

Secietaries of the Alumni asso-
ciations of the various colleges
throughout Kentucky, West Virgin-
ia, Indiana, Ohio. Illinois, MiJInemo
ta, Wisconsin and Michigan will ar
rive n Ann Arbor and Ynsimhnti tb
morning to attend the r15ritt con
vention of the An!°'icai Aliurn
council. The meetings will start w
2 o'clock this afternoon and con-
tinue throughout today and tomor-
row.
The purpose of this conference is
to provide an interchange of ideas
and experiences on common prob-
lems incidental toall alumni n-
deavor. Also, it will bring to the
newer workers in the field the best
prevailing aspects of alumni and
college relationships.
Albee to Speak.
Two ideas dominate the program
that has been worked out. The first

BRAZIL ACCLAIMS ITALI AN FLIERS
FOLLOWING TRANSATLANTIC FLIGHT
~f
lj
BrzlateFhe radsccs fulycrse tesot tlnic h
ocea ghtoNtal3as ade f or ue ri
l 4
Ai iise enrlI l1al liht nwht hot an1e -
ber of isItaiaSaitra nar sn e re bingweome toNatl,
Brazil, after they had successfully crossed the south Atlantic. The
ocean flight to Natal was made from Bolomla, Portuguese Ginea, Arica, j

Recent Productions on Campus,
Broadway tee be Discussed
in January Number.
Reviews of some of the recent
plays, both on Broadway and on
the campus. will be featured in the
January number of the Inlander,
student literary publication, which
next Wednesday will go on sale on
(he campus, it was announced last
night by Edwin Glavin, '32, man-
aging editor of the magazine.
Two student-written plays will be
]n(luded. One of these will be "Set-
ebos Laughs." by Harold A. Cour-
andcer, '31, former managing editor
of the Inlander. The name of the
other play was not announced.
JEssie Bonstelle, founder and di-
rector of the Detroit Civic theatre.
writes in this issue on "Experimen-
uaticn in the Theatre." For this
article she draws on her long ex-
perience in the Detroit theatre and
teveals many facts about her work
there.
A review of the New York the-
atrical season, including articles
on many of the plays that have
made distinct successes this year,
is presented by Victor Rabinowitz,
'31.
Two of the recent anthologies of
plays are also reviewed in the is-
sue. The two books are "Best Plays
in 1929," edited by Burns Mantel,
and the third series of Dickinson's
"Chief Contemporary Dramatists."
The January issue also includes
a number of student written short
stories and examples of poetry.
CURATOR TO TALK
ON INDIAN HABITS
Dr. Gilmore Has Lived Over 25
Years With Various Tribes.

Business to Pick U p
IIILIN[9,IU ILISoon, Says Farrell
R IEWS OF PLAYS

HEREDITY TELLS AS
BOY EXPLORES A
J Johnnie McMurray Undaunted
by Hihest Hills; Coaches
cam in School.
By Karl Seiffert, '33.
Perhaz: it is because his father'
a prosor of geography that
nine car old Johnnie McMurry has'
come mto such close contact with
certain physical characteristics of
the Arboretum.
At any rate, when he is on skis,
the topography of that portion of
the University grounds is the source
of liti anxiety for Johnnie. He
spends pra ica-y all his spare time
skiing, and there is not a single
hill in the whole Arboretum that
can conquer the agility of his ski-
clad feet.
Accompanied by his dog, "Reddy,"
a setter, he starts out for the hills
right after school and doesn't take
his skis off until time for dinner.
ite eepest grades are nothing
for Johnnie to climb. With the aid

NINE YEAR OLD
RBORETUM ON SKIS
of a single pole he makes them all,
panting to the top and then taking
a good run before plunging off
down the track, and up the other
side.
Of course, all this goes on outside
of business hours. During the day
he coaches at the Angell school, in
addition to attending classes there.
"I'm coach of my team," he said
yesterday, "and i'm going to be
until someone can beat me in the
chin and the sit-up."
Effinger and Yoakum
Attend College eet
Dean John R. Eifing or, of the
literary college, and Clarence S.
Yoakum, vice president of the Uni-
versity, are attending a conference
of the Association of American Col-
iges at Indinapois.
The ne in, wvii iarted yes-.
terday, will close late today, and
boh men wil return to the city
Saturday morning.

Associted Press Photo
James A. Farrell,

St
0 e
W.
U.
5i
1
Al
p o
di
c-

is to present one subject of value a distance of 1.860 miles.
to persons in any phase of the --_-
work. This part will be covered byI
William Albee who speaks on "Di- r
rct Mail Possibilities in the open-
ing meeting this afternoon at 2
o'clock.
The second object of the program I
whll be to present several funda- Y
mentals which are expected to be ---
of value to both the veteran and Reports on Religions Emphasis
newcomer in the field. This is to . . s
be accomplished in the Saturday Week Plans Indicative of
morning meeting when secretaries Successful Venture.
from nine of the leading schools
represented will be called upon to Reports of the various commit-
give five-ninute speeches on their i tees in charge of plans for the Re-
most outstanding achievement dur- ligious Emphasis week to be held
mg the last year. heru Ebp22 we to b hed
Those who will be called on are here Feb. 22 to March 1, and
James Armstrong, of Notre Dame; speeches by several faculty mem-
Jack Fullen, of Ohio State; Thomas bers featured the faculty-commit--

Broke Offender Not
Quite Broke Enough
Frank C, Kozial, 530 S. State
street, was hailed into Justice J.
H. Payne's court yesterday on a
trafiic violation charge.
"I guess I'Tl have to go to jail,"
said Kozial, "I'm broke."
"How much money have you
got?" asked Justice Payne.
Kozial searched his pockets
and reported the discovery of
$3.75'
"Three seventy - five, court
costs," was the justice's decision.
"Case dismissed."

President of tbe United States
:teel corporation, who says that
vidence which has developed
ithin the last 30 days shows that
je worst of the business depres-
ion is over.
:LxHIBITS OF PRINTS
TO' END TO~B
Modern Art Display Attracts
Attention; Marks End of
Season for Term.
Following a two-weeks display in
he north and south galleries of
Alumni Memorial hall, the exhibit
Af prints, shown by the fine arts I
department and sponsored by the
College Art association, will close
omorrow at 5 o'clock, Prof. Bruce
M. Donaldson, head of the depart-
ment, announced yesterday.
The exhibition, which includes
works of some of the leading artists
of the present day, has proved
quite successful, Professor Donald-
on stated, explaining that a con-
iderable number of students and
ownspeople have viewed it.
The Ann Arbor Art association's
annual exhibit of paintings from
he Chicago Art institute will also
close tomorrow. This exhibit is
comnrised of works which have
gained merit in the recent shows
in Chicago and has also been run-
ning for the last two weeks.
The closing of the two exhibitions
will mark the end of the art season
for the semester.

Giouser, of Nortnwestern; George
Heighway, of Indiana; John Mc-1
Kee, of Wooster; Herman Shipp, of!
Ohio Weslyan; Carl Stephens, of
Illinois; Glen Stewart, of Michigan
State; and T. Hawley Tapping, ofI
the University.
Will Tour Campus.
The luncheon Saturday at the
Michigan Union will complete the
active meeting of the conference,
a tour of the campus being sched-
uled for the afternoon and the
wrestling meet with Michigan State
filling out the remainder of the
program.
President Alexander G. Ruthven
will be the guest of honor at the

tee luncheon meeting yesterday.
Dean J. A. Bursley, Prof. S. F. Ging- REV. M'CORMICK
erich, Prof. Louis A. Hopkins, Prof.
L. I. Sharfman, Prof. John F. Shen- TO SPEAK SUNDAY
ard and Prof. J. L. Brumm com-j
mended the enterprise and. offered Bishop Will Preach at Episcopal
suggestions in their brief talks. Church Morning Services.
The Rev. Fr. Allen J. Babcock re-
nrted 'n th V.la,.ns&. in connect-ion

I

with fraternities ani soorities a
announced that one or two mem-
bers in each house will be chosen
as representatives of the commit-
tees for the week. Letters announc-
ing the project are to be sent to!
each house, dormitory and leaguer
house president previous to Ithe
event.

Rt. Rev. John N. McCormick, D.
-D., bishop of the diocese of West-
ern Michigan, will pay his annual
visit ' to St. Andrew's Episcopal
church this Sunday. The bishop
will preach at the eleven o'clock
service and will speak to the stu-
dents at harris Hall in the evening.

"Indians as Human Beings" is t
the subject of a lecture to be given l
by Dr. Melvin R. Gilmore, ethnobot- r
anist and curator of the University
museum, before the Student Fel- w
lowship of t h e Congregational o
church; at 6:30 Sunday night. q
Dr. Gilmore will base his opin-.'
ions on information gained over a
period of over 25 years spent liv-
ing with Indians of North Dakota,
Nebraska, and New York. He hasa
been adopted as a blood brothert
into several tribes, including the c
Pawnees and the Siouxs.
He joined the staff of the muse- i
um in 1929 and was formerly cur- n
ator of the state museums of both
North Dakota and Nebraska. His v
special interest has been in the re-f
lation of the Indians to their envir- 1-
bnment and 'the use they made of
plants and plant products. At the
present time, Dr. Gilmore is assem-
bling an exhibit of those native
materials used by Indians.
Visitor From Belgium
Ends Stay on Campus
Prof. C. Manneback, of the Uni-
versity of Louvain, Belgium, will
leave Ann Arbor after making an
inspection of the physics labora-
tories. Tuesday afternoon he ad-
dressed the physics colloquium on
the "Raman Effect," which deals1
with the change in wave length of
light when it is scattered by mole-
cules. Professor Manneback's sub-
ject is named after the brilliant
Indian physicist who won the Nobel
prize last year.
Everything Musical
SS BALDWIN LINE OF PIANOS
JESTIC, BRUNSWICK RADIOS
MARTIN RAND INTTSTRUMENTS t

luncheon, at which Tapping will. In the plans for publicity an- Eishop McCormick was gradu-
preside. "What's Wrong with the nounced in the report of that con ated from the University of Penn-
Alumni Association" will be the ; mittee by 'T. l Tlliste^r Mabley, '31 rmsh ~~z - o en
topic of the principal address. The the cooperation of many organiza- sylvania and Union Theological
speaker, however, has not yet been tions was - emphasised, includin semn.ry .t toh pot-graduate
announced. the University broadcasting studios, work at Johns-Hcpkins university,
All alumni secretaries have been as permission has been granted for and is t:. aethor of several books.
requested to either send or bring the broadcastin of two talks con- D'ing the World war, he was a
copies of their respective publica- Icerning Religious Emphasis week. ,lain in the United Mtates army,
tions, a display of which will be Ralph Johnson, of the faculty and and has since been prm.inent in
made under the direction of° Tap- a member of the eecutive commit- :tL- activity among his for-
ping, who is editor of the Michigan tee for the aetivkru!(Y anteImrcalieniguss. flirop MeCor-
Alumnus, purpose Of the h riek's visit is of partitulan inter-
The committee in charge of the audience on Feb. 25 est to the large oup of Episcopal1
conference includes the director,- ------ students fro the westrn half of
Hobert H. Bell, of Ohio Weslyanpac the sa ev n e has been
university; publicity e h a i r m a n, - bshop '"
Jack Fullen, of Ohio State; pro- as 'C e gP
gram committee, J o h n McKee,
James Armstrong, and Herman Riceh-rd Payne. v, elct_ d . Line of
S h i p p s; publications chairman, to succ :' John 2> m , ceio is
Tapping, and representatiye, Glen graduati; this cr na tre.
Stewart. urer c. e Core 1-ueis at a TEMATCHLE

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Black Silk
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Vest

mcetG7l hed yestce crnoi
Kemler, eed ao Meet
Here WitJ Cormittee mitte.iUUir he a n
Erade.
A meeting of the traffic control a3
committee of the American Society INVITATIONS
of Municipal Engineers at the Uni- NAND
versity Saturday, Feb. 24, was an- PERSONAL CARDS
nounced yesterday by R. J. Morri- PRINTED
son, of the highway engineering
department. Loo p ne
M. E. Kemler, city engineer of dab1e Service
Akron, O., and John W. Reed, for- A lied Arrow Place
men commissioner of Detroit public o. . MORRILL
works and president of the society.I 4 ae
will also meet with the committee.< 314 Souith State St. Phone 6615'j,

::, :
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UNIVERSITY
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William Wade Hinshaw
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