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December 09, 1930 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-12-09

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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1930

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

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STUDBENT 0DRYSih
N [ l N ST
LNTER CONTET
FOR ESSAY PIZES
Theme of This Year's Articles
Is Alchoholic Drink in
Modern Society.'
'PLAN AREA CONTESTS
Intercollegiate Association Hopes
to Encourage Inte'ligent
Interest in Sub jec .
Undergraduates on tccampus
are eligible to enter nationa
college essay contest -:e:mored -y
the Intercollegiate P.}iiton
ciation, Dean John R. } er n
the literary dollegw, ae:uncid yc
terday.-
The theme of tC essay this y cV
will be "Alcoholic Drenk in Modern
Society." The purpose of the con-
test is to increase inte l0gent inter-
est in the problem of alcoholic
drink, to encourage students to
study it for themselves, and to dis-
play an expression of the results
of their study in a paper that will
convey information, and at the
same time be interesting to the
reader.

1
I
F
(I
I

~RANKING RAIL OAD ?ROT HERHOOD 0 FFICIALS ASSE
TO HLLD DSCUSSIOI OF SIXR GUR AYF'OR TRA

MUBLE
INMEN

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PHYSICIST TO T | Fog Asphyxiates60
|\\\|Ul | |U \ LBelgian Inhabitants
wJ9TM STUOIES a
Revans to Discuss Experiments
Conducted in Europe on --
Disintegration.
"Recent Experiments on the Ar- E
tificial Disintegration of the Na- m~r'fEP -uSere /
cleus" will be discussed by Reginald 4AE.F 6fAN
W. Revans, Commonwealth fellow S OY-2Rr P
from University college, London
and Emanuel college, Cambridge
university, who is conducting re- ;
search at the physics laboratories C
here, before the physics colloquium
to h i-in1A . f-A"1G t~fi nl +..7l'

Ann Arbor Parents

M

Given Opportunity
to Study Children
An opportunity for Ann ArbQt
parents to study child psychology is
offered At the present time by the
University Elementary schcol in,
placing a collection of books on this
subject in their library. The use
of these books is limited to teach-
ers and the parents of members o
the elementar'y school.
Although there are not, as yet,
enough books in this library to al-
low circulation, officials plan to add,
moreoas soon as possible so tit
the books can be taken out of thie
library for reference work.
The library has also a collection
of 1,000 books of the "children's
classics," which include works by
men of the calibre of Stevenson,
Grimm, and Anderson.
At the present time Edith Thom-
as, head of the University library
service, is selecting 500 more books
to be added to this group. These
will be the books for children that
have been published this fall.
RADIO TODAY.
Wesley Maurer, of the journal-
ism department, will discuss the
Michigan Interscholastic Press
association which will convene
here this month during the Uni-
versity radio hourbtoday. Ray-
mond Mdrin will be the soloist
on the program.

Aso.QfatecdPros Photo
Ran~g icials of the five major railroad brother teojs assembled in Clevelan i o discuss the six-hour
day fc ai d workers. Left to right: David B. Robertson, brotherhood of locomotive firemen and engine-
men; Aexaxdcr F. Whitney, brotherhood of railroad trainmen; Aivajijey Johnston, brotherhood of locomotive
enginee 's; T. C. Cashen, switchmen's union of North America; and E. P. Curtis, brotherhood of railway con-
ductors.

to be held at 4:15 o'clock today in
Room 1041, East Physics building.
This will be a discussion of some
recent experiments on disintegra-
ion of the atomic nucleus that are
being made .at Halle, Germany, and
Cambridge, England. In one of the
experiments to be explained, the
experimenter allows alpha parti-
cles to fall upon aluminum foils
and detects groups of protons that
are emitted in the disintegration.
From these results a little may be
learned about the energy levels in-
side the atomic nucleus. The re-
sults of this experiment conform
with the latest theory of the atom
and agree with the theoretical pre-
dictions of the wave mechanics.
h _______

Map shows arca in Belgium in
which more than 0 deaths are be-,
lieved to have resulted from a
malady brought on by a mysterious
Sales of 1931 License
Tags Conti,2nues Today
Sale of 1931 license plates will be
continued today at the Chamber of
Commerce offices. Michigan certi-
ficates of title must be presented
at the time the platesuare pur-
chased. Persons from out of the
state may make application for this
certificate which must be done be-
fore obtaining the license.

Eight Areas Planned.
Eight interstate area contests ar
to precede the national contest
Winners of the area contests will
be considered in the national con
test.
The eight interstate areas, with
.$100'offered in prizes for each, are
Northeastern, Eastern, South east-
ern, Central, Northern, Southwest-
ern, Western, and Pacific-Rocky
mountain. The exact designation
of territory to follow state lines if
possible, will be announced as the
contest period develops.
National to Start in May.
The winner of the national con-
test will be awarded $500; second
prize, $300; third prize, $150, and
fourth prize, $50. The essays are
not to contain more than 2,000
words. The interstate area con-
tests will close March 31, 1931, and
the national contest will start early
in May.
DEAN WILL SPEAK
AT LANSING MEET
Addressing the Michigan Educa-
tion association, department of
high school principals, Dean John
R. Effinger, of the literary college,
and Dr. T. Luther Purdom, director
of the bureau of appointments and
occupational information, will dis-
cuss the topic, "The High School
Graduate and His Subsequent Ca-
reer," at 8:30 o'clock, Friday morn-
ing in the ballroom of the Hotel
Olds in Lansing.
Prof. George E. Carrothers, of the
School of Education, will report on
statistics from different phases of
high schools in the state.
Economics Professors
to Talk in Cleveland
Prof. Carter L. Goodrich, Prof.
Morris A. Copeland, and Vladimir
P. Timoshenko, of the economics
department, will deliver papers be-
fore the American Economics asso-
ciation and the American Statis-
tical association at the next meet-
ing on Dec. 29 to 31 at Cleveland,
Ohio.
Meetings of such organizations
as the American Association of
University Professors, the American
Farm Economics association, and
the American Labor association
which take place at the same time,
will be attended by a majority of
the members of the department.
'Ensian Circulation
Staff to Begin Drive
Fraternities and sororities will be
canvassed today and tomorrow by
the members of the staff of the
'Ensian, it was stated yesterday by
George E. Hofmeister, '31, business
manager of the yearbook.
Organizations, where members
subscribe to more than 15 copies of
the 'Ensian, will be presented with
a complimentary copy with the
1mnme urinted on in gold lettering,
Hofmeister has said. This is the
last sale which will be conducted
before the price of the book is
raised.
WANTD!- - -
W AN T AIDS I'AYA'

Director Announces Extensive
Plans for Intensive Schedule
of Programs.
Membership in the School of Mu- N
sic Symphony orchestra now totals<
90 players, Prof. David Mattern, di-
rector of the organization, an- E
nounced yesterday. The number in-
cludes alternates who will appear G
on future programs.
An intensive program schedule
has been planned for the organiza-
tion, Mattern added. Besides the!G
programs given ias 'riday night at A
Couzens hall for the nurses and the IV
faculty concert Sunday afternoon, se
the orchestra played last night in
the auditoiVn of the Ann Arbor "E
High school for the benefit of the Sc
city's unemployed. Students in the ic
classes i conducting had charge 30
of this program.
Arrangements have also been oi
made for a concert to take place
after the holidays for the Detroit H
Chamber Music society. This con-
cert will probably be given in the L
Detroit Art institute. Concerts have
also been planned to take place in F
Ann Arbor and surrounding towns
while the orchestra is also listed Ja
for future broadcasting programs.

What's
Going

AMERICAN MAKES
EXPOSITION PLANS
New Office Is Opened in United
States Parisian Embassy.

kin ) (By AssociatedP-res)
1_PARIS, Dec. 8.-A new office has
_^1-HETRS.been opened in the American Em-
bassy here. Behind its desk sits
Mimes-All-campus revue, "Aw C. Bascom Slemp, formerly secre-
uts"
Majestic - Eddie Cantor in tary to President Coolidge. He has
Whoopee," technicolor. come to France as commissioner
Michigan-George Arliss in "Old general of the United States to the
nglish." French International Colonial Ex-
Wuerth-George O'Brien in Zane . w
rey's "Last of the Duanes." position which is to open next May.
____With Charles Henry Burke, who,
GENERAL. bears the title of commissioner, Mr.
Lecture - "Recent Additions to Slemrpvo is determining what sort of
reek Prose," 4:15 o'clock, room D, representation the United States is
lumni Memorial hall, Prof. J. C. to have at the exposition, and is
Tinter, Thomas Spencer Jerome preparing plans for a building to
ries. houe exhibits.
Lecture-Prof. M. A. Copeland on These United Sta-es exhibits will
Jconomic Theory and the Natural embrace private business displays
ience Point of View," at Econom- as well as the official government
s club meeting. 7:30 o'clock, room exposition of what United States
4, Michigan Union. possessions are doing. In the lat-
Mathematical ciub--Mects at 8 ter, the Philippine Islands are ex-
clock, room 3201, Angell hall. pected to play a large part, with
Benefit bridge tca- to oclock awa Alaska, Guam, Porto Rico,
arris hall.
arri; hall.and fthe Viin Islands also figur -'
isg. The seo n of exhibitable arti-
AW YER TL D cles includes anything related to
ORMA A CLB naUTon.
-MA 1 A CunLUes will have pavilions
___ _ >m Vecnlnes Park near Paris,
'ckson, Mch., Band WX-U Pry ;hera the expoition is to be held.
for Dance Friday Ng-ht. They vre Italy, Portugal, Belgium,
Denmark, Holland and the United
The Lawyers club will hold its gta ts. Many other countries will
nual Christmas formal dance take part in the "Information City" I
-iday, Nov. 12, in the lounge of where intelligence concerning col-
e club, it was announced yester- ma ion is to be grouped. Great
y by Leo J. Conway, '31L, chair Britain will figure here.
an of the dance commitee. French buildings at the Park are
Music will be furnshed by a gn up -apidly, some of them be-
ckson, Mich., bar/- and a mid- i facsimiles of temples .and ex-
ght supper will be served follow- oic structures found in French
g the dance. ersoas possessions, such as Indo-
Conway is being assisted in com- C:ina. The French colonial empire
eting arrangements by the memi embraces a score of countries and
rs of the dance committee, in- islnds - Morocco, Madagascar,
iding Charles T. Pfluger, '3=L, ,ndo-China, Guadeloupe, Reunion,
orge J. Bowers, '31L, Bernard d.I Martinioue, West Africa, Equatorial
ivans, '31L, Clarence W. Brown- A ricand thus offers wide range
, '31L, and Sherwood Ake, '321. for such an exposition.

istorian Gives Talk
or Early Migrations
of Dutch Into State
Had the dissenters in Holland
been left undisturbed, the immigra-
tion of the Dutch to Michigan in
1846 might not have taken place,
Garret Kempers, of the history de-
partment, stated yesterday in his
radio address "Early Dutch Settle-
ments in Michigan."
Economic c6nditions were also
cited by Kempers as being instru-
mental in bringing about the de-
parture from Holland as well as the
widespread talk o' the prosperity
in the United States.
Upon arriving in this country, the
Dutch, Kempers pointed oui, went
to Detroit where they were assisted
by a group of men called the Pres-
byterian Coterie who had been in-
formed of their coming.
The definite location had not yet
been decided by Van Raalte, leader
of the group, upon their arrival in
Detroit, but their trunks were
marked "Wisconsin," Kempers said.
The advantages of Michigan were
uressed upon them by New Yorkers
and folk from Albany as well as
people of Detroit, and they decided
to remain in this state. The states-
men, according to Kempers, were
also eager to have them here.
Two places of settlement were
suggested in Michigan-one on the
western side, and the other in the
Saginaw river valleys. Upon the
recommendation of Van Raalte,
following an investigation, the
little band moved upon the locality
of the Black river early in 1847.
The numbers increased rapidly and
by August of the first year some
800 persons had come to the colony,
and by October the number had
increased to 1,700.
The recent census report says the
number of Hollanders by birth or
descent in Michigan is more than
100,000, Keniers stated.

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LABORATORY
SUPPLIESj
CHEMICALS
DRUG
SPECIALTIES
SUNDRIES
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FRATERNITIES
\lay ~Now Have Our
426 SERVICE
Thompson

SC OR AL UNION
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8:15
HILL
AUJ TORIUM L

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