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December 09, 1930 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-12-09

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PAGE TWO

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THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1930

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1930

2

FUTURE UNIVERSITY
STUDENTS PROVED
MOREI TELLICENT
Wood Conducts Survey of High
School Pupils Intending
to Enter Colleges.
USE OTIS EXAMINATION
Non-Collegiate Groups Proved
Considerably Inferior
in Mental Ability.
High school students of the state
who expect to attend the Univer-
sity have a higher average intelli-
genee than those in Michigan who
plan to attend other institutions of
higher learning, according to data
recently collected by Prof. Clifford
Woody, of the School of Education,
director of the bureau of educa-
tional reference and research.
The material for this survey was
obtained from the examination of
a number of high school students
in 19 cities in the state, by means
of thie Odis test of mental ability
and the Iowa high school content
examination.
Literary Students Excel.
Results further show that the
achievements of students who in-
tend to go to other colleges in
Michigan is above average and ap-
proximately equal to that of those
who intend to go to out-of-state
colleges. Students who planto go
to normal schools and thosetwho
are undecided as to their choice
of college showaaverage ability on
the tests. The non-collegiate group,
he found, show very inferior re-
sults.

Vice- resident Curtis Welcomes New Senate Members

SIGMA DELTA CHI
TO DISCUSS MEET

on Steps of

Capitol Building After First Session

Members Will Arrange
Con vention Today.

PressI

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Final plans for the annual meet-
ng of the Michigan Interscholastic
Press association in Ann Arbor on
Thursday, Friday and Saturday oft
his week will be discussed at a
luncheon today by members of Sig-
ma Delta Chi, honorary journalis-
ic fraternity in charge of the cpn-
ention. Members of the journal-
Lm faculty of the University will
also assemble for u:scussion of con-
ention plans.
ilnong the features of the 1930
onvention are numerous discus-
ion groups which will be led by
tudents a n d faculty members,
peeches by Dean Wilbur R. Hum-
>hreys, of the literary college, Rev.
Frederick Bohn Fisher, of the First
Mlethodist church, and Dr. Walter
Mausaur, and luncheon and ban-
4uet programs on Friday night and
Saturday noon at the Union.
Today's meeting will be held in
he Russian room of the LeagueE
building.
This," he said, "is the secret of
?cearis' success. The young French-
man, Decaris, is only 29 years old
and has already won the Prix de
Rome given by the Ecole des Beaux
Arts, has already illustrated numer-
ous books published in Europe with
his original etchings and is looked
upon as one of the foremost illus-
trators in Europe."
When describing his present
home in France, Chamberlain said,
not without a humorous glint in
his eye, "It's a good place to do
what you want, dress the way you
want, act the way you want,-and
drink what you want."
REPORT ON FOG DEATHS
(By Associated Press)
LONDON, Dec. 8.-The myster-
ious "death fog" of the Meuse val-
ley of Belgium which last week
claimed more than three score hu-
man lives was not due to any com-
municable disease in the opinion of
the Belgium health authorities and
they so informed the British Min-
istry of Health today.

Paul Porter Would Take Leader
of Industries Responsible
for Workers' Welfare.
Envisioning a radically changed
political and economic order with a
supreme economic council dedicat-
ing to business and an additional
branch of Congress based on func-
tional representation of industry,
Paul Porter, secretary for the
League of Industrial Democracy,
discussed the subject, "Why I Am a
Socialist," yesterday at an All-
Campus forum in Alumni Memorial
hall.
Porter iAced out four points of
the present system wit which he
has a particular quarrel. The irre-
sponsibility of leaders of industry
he exemplified in the action of
Henry Ford, who a few years ago
laid off his entire force during a
change of models. The unjust dis-
tribution of work he illustrated by
citing many instances of wage
e.rners who were employed 11 and
12 hours a day while uthers were
not working at all.-
The tremendous waste and the
unequal distribution of wealth were
his other two points in this con-
nection. As p}oof that waste ex-
ists in modern industry, Porter re-
ferred to the statement that for
every barrel of oil taken out of the
ground there is another barrel
wasted.
Emphasizing the fact that the
socialist program is in no way rev-
olutionary or disturbingly upset-
ting, the speaker described the
gradual change which the socialist
party favors. The socialization of
farming, he said, would be a long
way in the future and such highly
individualistic professions as paint-
ing or writing would, he said, prob-
ably never come under the social-
(ized regeme.

Azso i'zted Press Photo
New members of the United States Senate posed on the steps of the capitol after being welcomed to Congress by Vice-President Charles
Curtis. Left to right: Curtis, Ben Williamson, Kentucky; George McGill, Kansas; Robert J. Bulkley, Ohio; William E. Brock, Tennesee; Robert
D. Carey, Wyoming; James J. Davis, Pennsylvania, and Dwight W. Morrow, New Jersey. All except Brock are new to the Senate this session;
he assumed office by appointment last session.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __-_ _ __-_ ----- - - - - - - -

STUDENTS P OTiEST~

ANN ARBOR NEWS-BRIEFS
_._._

ETCHER ATTENDS
EXHIBIT OF WORK
S. V. Chamberlain, Noted Artist,
Visits Ann Arbor.

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Coaching Aspirants LoW.
Another interesting fact was re- Sate Radio S by a brother and three sisters. Samuel. V. Chamberlain, noted
vealed by a comparison of the abil- Burn Effigy of Governor After System Funeral services will take place American etcher, is visiting Ann
ity of the high school student and Five Are Suspended From Proves Aid to PoliCe Wednesday afternoon at the Mueh Arbor this week in connection with
the course that he had elected to ga ou e o lig chapel. the exhibit of his and Decaris
take in college. It was found that Through the medium of their works now being shown in the west
those who intended to take liter- (By AssoiiTe Prs) newly installed radio system, state Automobiles Damaged gallery of Alumni Memorial hall.
ary courses rated the highest on UNIVERSITY, Miss., Dec. 8-Uni- police yesterday were working inI The artist, who now makes his3
the mental test, while students who versity of Mississippi students spec- closer connection with their head- Three minor traffic accidents oc- home in Senlis, a small town to the
intended to take agriculture rated ulated today on what action Chan- quarters in Lansing than has been curred Sunday on Ann Arbor north of Paris, is a former member
the lowest. Those who planned to cellor J. N. Powers would take re- possible at any time in the past. streets. of the art faculty of the Unversity
take engineering and law scored and has sine attained fame for}
slightly better than average re- garding the burning Saturday night Installed Saturday in the office Slight damage resulted from an his work in French and English
sults. of a stuffed figure bearing an in- of Sheriff James W Robinson, the accident on Huron street near subjects, many of which are hung
Professor Woody stated that he scription, "Down with Bilbo." radio has been at work constantly Main street when a car driven by in museums throughout the world.
was unwilling to draw any con- Possible comment'also was await- I receiving dispatches and hourly Ignazio Manguso, 3404 Leland in a interview yesterday, he was
clusions fro the daa ntil e ed from Gov. Theodore Bilbo. time from state police headquar- street, Detroit, collided with one riend, Decaris, one of the ranking
could check the obtained results "haentigtsa"te10fredDcrsoefternkg
with another series of examina- I g ters. Sheriff's deputies yesterday driven by Clyde Bennett, 1206etchers and engravers in the world,
tinfchancellor told questioners upon revealed the possibility that Franklin boulevard, Ann Arbor. bcut cared little to discuss his own
____________his return from Jackson, because h a re-
Ih ave not had time to make an ceiving set may be installed on one Fred Staeb, 714 W. Liberty street, wOtk
investigation. Of course I am sorry of the county scout cars, making it was driving north on Main street O Dn he say "Thai nhe
DaiyOfficialBullet thergrttablenmycidenthadncc.."ieinthepssible for that department to co- when his car collided with that of power or the ability to make the
C artovaly iden e operate better with the state forces C. N. Manley, 1232 Sheldon street, observer get what he was trying to
Michigan Union, 8 p.m., Wednes- student Eody, co eting the burn- than has before been practicable. Jackson. Manley, who reported the put into the picture than Decaris.
0. P e N ing of the figure uth the dropping With the centralized system now accident, said that his car had sus- Withouta doubt he is one of the
Anning will talk on "Blocks." His of the university ard other state- in operation, calls received at Lans- tamedsed n n d in th e eaworld."
speech will be preceded by a social oned stitutionse e ar- ing from any state police station smash.dChumnng-boadhinds no theworld.
to be present, and anyone iterest- ciation of Colleges, said the proper are being broadcast immmediately. --- views on modem nistic trends or the
ed in Mathematics is invited to thing for "Ole Miss studen to do Detroiter Pays Fine development of art but believes in
attend. There will be a 25 cent is to go to work and make ar hon- Old - 1 putting down w."atever one thinks
charge for refreshments. est effort to regain the rating Oe"Psilliam Deico, 3982 ieldrum ave- should be in the picture and giving
About midnight Saturday a p :( Death came suddenly yesterday nue, Detroit, was fined $10 and whatever interpetation one feels.
A. S.C.E. Student Branch of the of pajamas was stuffed with cotton morning to Harry J. Ely, 70, who $4.55 in costs yesterday in justice

L

NOW
SHOWING

i

ZANE GREY'S
LAST OF THE DUANES

2:00, 3:40
7:00, 9:00

with
GEORGE O'BRIEN
Zane Grey's mighty tale of the great Southwest where cattle
men play a game of quick gun play and shy love making.

stealing bad

.M . . . U U 1i1Glll l Il,
American Society of Civil Engineers'
dinner and meeting at the Michi-
gan Union, 6:15 p.m., Wednesday,
December 10.
Geological and Geographical
Journal Club: Meeting Thursday,
Dec. 11, at 8:00 in room 4056 N. S.
Bldg. Mr. H. M. Kendall will give
an illustrated lecture on "Occu-
pance of the Lower Vesere Valley
in France."
Union Executive Council: Meet-
ing at four, Wednesday.
Pi Lambda Theta: General busi-
ness meeting Thursday, December
11, 4:30 p.m. Michigan League Bldg.
For the discussion of the program
for the banquet during the N. E. A.
convention.
Faculty Women's Club: Recep-
- tion, dancing and cards for mem-
bers and their husbands, 8:30 to
12:00 p.m., Thursday, December 11,
Michigan League.
Garden Section of the Faculty
Woman's Club will meet at the
Palmer Field House Wednesday at
2 o'clock. Miss Gillette from Detroit
will speak on "Flower Shows."
Members of the Garden Section of
the Woman's Club and of the Ann
Arbor Garden Club are cordially
invited.
Esperanto: Professor C. L. Mead-
er will lecture on "The Dawning
Era's International Language" Fri-
day, Dec. 12, at 4:15 in Room 231,
Angell hall.
J-Hop Committee: A picture of
the committee will be taken at
12:15 tomorrow at Speddings studio.
WATC
!A A 2% U 9 % d&1 ^

set afire, and hoisted to the top of
the flagpole in the center of the
university grounds.
UNIVERSITY OF K A N S A S -
Homecoming day this year will bef
celebrated the 40th anniversity of
football at the university.

c; -- at the home of Mrs. Pauline
Zip ,"rardner, 211 S. Dilvi1sio0n,
wh.. he had lived for some years.
Born August 25, 1860, at Ingersol,
Ontario, Ely had been a resident
of Ann Arbor since 1895, and a
barber in the P. A. Lee shop for
the last 12 years. He is survived

court when he answered a charge
of driving his truck 40 miles per
hour on Washtenaw avenue Sun-
day.
DANISH KING INJURED
(131 ss«°rterd 1 r'ss>
COPENHAGEN, Denmark, Dec. 8.
-King Christian was seriously cut
about the face today as he return-
ed, shortly after midnight, to Fred-
enborg from Sunday night's opera?
in Copenhagen.

BRIGHT SPOT
802 PACKARD STREET
TODAY, .':30 to 7:30
BAKED HAL
PORK CHOPS. APPLE SAUCE
ROAST VE'AL, JELLY
HAMBUYG STEAK
MASHED OR IHiASHED BROWN
POTATOES
CABBAGE SALAD
.COTTA(G E CHEESE
35c
WE DELIVER PHONE 8241

ANTHROPOLOGIST DENIES HIGH BROW
INDICATES SUPERIOR INTELLIGENCE
Variable Height of Hair Line commonly believed, but is con-
Has Little to Do With tiolied by th~e variable height of
the hair line.'
Mental Power. His measurements show that the
(a' "IssoiatedPress)brow of the western Eskimo man is
WASHINGTON, Dec. 8. - High about a quarter of a centimeter
. higher than the average for males
brows do not necessarily indicate of old American families.
superior intelligence. The Eskimo woman has exactly
This is the conclusion of Dr. Ales the same skull height as her Amer-
Hrdlicka, Smithsonian anthropolo- ican sister, but her head is larger
gist, set forth in a report to the than that of the white woman. The
bureau of American ethnology on entire skull of the Eskimo man is
measurements of hundreds of Eski- I about the same size as that of the
mo skulls. "old American" man.
If "b} ains" and height of fore- Although the Eskimo's respira-
head were directly related, Dr. tion rate and temperature are close
Hrdlicka says, the Eskimo would be to those of white men, his pulse
intellectually superior to the white rate is very low and he is consider-
man. ably below the white average on
Instead, he asserts, "anthropo- dynamometric tests, Dr. Hrdlicka
metric studies have shown repeat- reports. The pulse seldom goes
edly that the height of forehead is above 60 while the white race aver-
not a safe guage of intelligence, as age is more than 70.
Te W OFF O RD
ON THE BEACH
MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA
CHRISTMAS TIME(
IS PLAYTIME
IN FLORIDAn
Use this vacation period for a rea
relaxation from the grind of study.
ENJOY YOUR FAVORITE OUTDOOR SPORT
GOLF SWIMMING * BOATING - FISHING

ALSO
"THE BREAK-UP"
Captain Jack Robinson and his dog "Scooter" take you on an extended
trip through Alaska. See the wonders of A Thousand Smokes, unscaleable
Mt. McKinley, and the annual break-up of ice on the Yukon.
A IA JESTIC Now
Daily at 2:00-3:40-7:00-9:00
WHDADL
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Zn ~A ?7 X 7 VA''V r'' YA nr~rd-Ts

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