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November 29, 1930 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-11-29

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER, 29, 1930

THE IiiIC..IJI AN

DAILY

SATURDAY.. NOVEMBER..29,.1930..TH....... ......DAI.Y

orF F AIE MEMBERV ACTS 9

\\ (TV 0 OF WIFE OF CABINET MEMBER ACTS
\LII 0 COLORS AS HOST ESS IN WASHINGTON SHOP
AD STYLEIIS MARK
PAN HELLENIC BALL:.i<

ENGLISH LESSONS
GIVEN TO WOMEN
Afternoon Opportunity' Classes

HOSPITAL SCHOOL GIVES CHILDREN
REQUIRED WORKFOR ALL GRADES

Bedside Instruction Is Offered
For Cases in Acute Units.

Youthfulness and Sophistication
Bended in Modish Costumes
of Dancers.
LARGE NUMBER ATTENDS
Satin, Taffeta Predominate as
Materials for Evening Gowns
This Season.
Gowns that displayed a blend of
youthfulness and sophistication
and that emphasized the import-
ance of line and fine detail were to
be seen at the Pan Hellenic Ball
held last night in the ballroom of
the Women's League building. Mar-
garet Healy, '32, general chairman
of the ball was stunningly attired
in a gown of blush satin made
with a square neckline, high waist
and long full skirt. Three brown
gardenias were artistically arrang-
ed on the shoulder and brown slip-
pers and long brown gloves com-
peted her costume.
Eleanor Cooke, '31, president of
the League, wore a gown of egg-
shell satin, trimmed with dark blue
green bows placed low in the back
and shoes of the same color as the
bows. The dress was made with a
short peplum around the hips and
a cowl neckline. A necklace of
carved jade completed the ensem-
ble.
Movie Gown Complemented by Old
Fashioned Jewelry.
Helen Cheever, president of the
Pan Hellenic association, looked
charming in a flowered moire gown
made with a long circular skirt and
a bow in the back at the edge of
a neckline. An old fashioned neck-
lace. of pearls and gold, long white
gloves and white shoes were com-
plements of the costume.
Mary Louise Behymer, '31, Wo-
men's Editor of the Daily, wore an
orange colored taffeta gown, made
with a flare skirt reaching to the
floor. The high waistline was
marked by a narrow belt and the
back of the gown was adorned with
three small bows. Gold shoes and
gold jewelry added the finishing
touch.
Rhinestones Worn With Ivory
Crepe.
Sarah Francis Orr, '31, chairman
of favors for the ball, was dressed
in a gown of ivory crepe made on
grecian lines. A rhinestone clasp at'
the neck afforded the only trim-
ming, and rhinestone earings were
the only jewelry.
Jocelyn McLean, '31, treasurer of
the ball wore a gown of eggshell
crepe with a high waistline and
flared skirt. There was also a flare

~Ld~LU L~L"There is an enrollment of over
"Opportunity" classes in the ele- two hundred children in the acute
ments of English, held in the after- n convalescent units of the Uni-'
nonso iEngrasnhd m hafter- dversity hospital School, which in-
noon so immigrant women whose dludes grades one to twelve. In one
family duties occupy their evenings of the convalescent units more than
may attend, have been started on 140 children assemble daily for a
Tuesdays and Thursdays at the !hool program of from two to
i'hree hours," stated Mrs. Geral-
Perry School by Mrs. Rose Pauline, dine Notley, supervisor of the Uni-
a graduate student of the Univers- versity Hospital school.
ity of Michigan in Educational "_n the acute hospital all instruc-
Psychology. tion i.; bedside, and the cases are
According to Mrs. Pauline, the referred to the school by the doctor
women can all understand English in charge, but in the convalescent
to some extent but cannot read or unit some of the children come to
write. The work is divided into the hospital school-room for reci-}
instruction in reading, writing, tation and instruction. All study isI
spelling, and conversation; history supervised, and instruction is in-
and principles of citizenship; the dividual. There is no group work at
topics used for all these phases of all.
instruction thus indirectly giving "The course of study in the
information valuable in getting grades conforms to the require-I
citizenship papers. ments of the State Board of Edu-
Although the immigrant popula- cation, while that of the high
tion of Ann Arbor is of various school students is similar to the
nationalities, practically all of the work being done in the home'
women in the classes are Greek. i school. Correspondence between the

the children are happier when they
have something to occupy their,
constructive work, from a normal I
angle, which they will carry over Zeta Phi Eta Awaits Decision of
into their home life. School work Men to Argue that "Co-ed"
is one phase of hospital life which Behaves as a Human.
is normal, and therefore it receives
thgreat dealof hospital authoritis Zeta Phi Eta, formerly Portia,
to make life for the children as announces a challenge to Alpha
normal as possible. Nu in the form of a debate to be
"They are the future citizens of held at a joint meeting of both
Michigan, and have every right to organizations on Tuesday, Dec. 2,
lead a normal life and enjoy the at 8 o'clock in the Alpha Nu room
same privileges as others. In con-
nection with this idea, the school in Angell hall. The question which
works with the D. A. R. in the has been decided upon for the dn-
Americanization of foreigners, and bate is: Resolved: that the co-ed
every effort is expended to make of behaves as a human being.
them material for good citizens. Since Zeta Phi Eta has made the
Library Service For Patients. challenge and since they are to
"The Hospital School has charge present the opinion of the women
of the service in the Hospital Lib- on campus, they will, if the chal-
rary, which is for all patients, adult lenge is accepted, uphold the
and children, but recently there affirmative.
has been a special service estab- Hannah Lennon, '31 Ed., presi-
lished for children under fifteen dent of Zeta Phi Eta states that
years of age. Over two hundred this subject was chosen because it
books and magazines are distribut- has been discussed frequently by
ed for them weekly, and they are individuals but never in the form
carefully chosen with the idea of ofad e.
correlation between recreational A tentative team has been
reading and school studies. chosen by ZetasPhi Eta consisting
"Th Hopitl Shoo. sareno of Jane Robinson, '3lEd., Kather-
"The Hospital School spare no ine Hicks, Grad., Frances K. John
effort to make their children as son, '33, and Helen Haapamak, '32.
normally happy and contented as Definite plans and teams will be
[is possible under the circum- announced after the challenge has
stances," Mrs. Notley said in con- been answered by Alpha Nu.
clusion.

Asso~nated ress
irs. Patrick J. Hurley (right), wife of the secretary of war, acts as
official hostess of a thrift shop in Washington, operated for the benefit
of the child welfare society. She is shown making a sale to Mrs. Randall
Ranner, of Washington.

on the right shoulder in front and
on the left shoulder in back. With
this Miss McLean wore green shoes
and crystophase jewelry.
Dorothy Elsworth, '32, chairman,
of the ballroom was attired in ivory
satin trimmed, with a tourq1ise
flower on one side. Tourquoise
jewelry and shoes to match were
the accessories of her costume.
Eileen Blunt, '33, chairman of chap-
erones, was gowned in flowered taf-
feta trimmed with a large bow that
touched the floor. Blue crepe shoes
emphasized the predominate color
of the dress.
Net and Lace Forms Striking
Combination.
Eugenie Chapel, '32, chairman of
tickets, wore a dress of blue net and
lace. The bodice was made of pale
blue lace and the skirt was formed
of four net ruffles of the same col-
or. Lace mits and coral colored
shoes added to the costume. Doro-
thy Felske, '32, chairman of music,
wore a chic gown of aqua marine
taffeta, made with ruffles at the
hip and a drop ruffle at the shoul-
der. With this she wore crystal
earings, eggshell gloves and shoes.
Jean Botsford, '33, chairman of
decorations, was attractive in a
gown of eggshell satin with which
she wore orchid shoes and crystal
jewelry. Margaret Thompson, '32,
chairman of publicity, wore a gown
of orchid taffeta trimmed with a
green bow, and green shoes.

Dormitory Festivities
Mar Thanksgiving
As a result of the general home-
ward hegira this week-end the
dormitories sponsored few social
activities. Thanksgiving dinners
were served at each house for those
j who remained there. Helen New-
( berry entertained about 50 guests.
Elaborate decorations carried out,
the Thanksgviing theme at all the
various houses. Martha Cook enter-
tained several of the students' par-
ents: Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Keegstra,
Muskegon; Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Robb,
Leonard; Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Haga-
man, Brown City; Mr. and Mrs. E.
W. Smith, Sparta; Mr. and Mrs.
Michael O'Hearn, Grand Rapids;
and many other guests.
Following the Pan-Hellenic ball,
two of the dormitories, Martha
Cook and Betsy Barbour enter-
tained at breakfasts. Martha Cook
received 22 couples, and Miss Alice
Atkinson, and Miss Margaret Smith
acted as chaperones. Mosher-Jor-
dan which is to be represented at
the ball by the large group of 42
is not serving breakfast, but the

A few of them are German; and
Mrs. Pauline says that she wouldl
like to have a truly cosmopolitan
group. The students are divided by
their knowledge of English and
not by their nationality. The
teacher is trying to give each one
enough individual instruction not
only to give her a working knowl-
edge of English but to overcome
her accent.
Some of the women have been
here as long as ten years, and some
have just come to Ann Arbor dur-
ing the last year. All of them seem
to be progressing from an economic
standpoint, but simply cannot cope
with the language. A few have
children in high school who try to!
help to give them American ideas.
Mrs. Pauline, although believing in
the efficacy of a bi-lingual training
for children, tries to get the women I
to talk English in their homes.
"The women are very eager and
anxious to learn," says Mrs. Pau-
line. "We use the same pedagogical
methods with them as one does for
children; we must adapt it however
as these women have a wide back-
ground of experience.
women are planning to breakfast
with several of the sororities. j
Among other social events of the,
week was the luncheen, given by
Mosher-Jordan Tuesday in honor
of Miss Lloyd and the heads of the
various dormitories and the Law-
yer's club.

hospital school and the teachers at
home is maintained, so that the
child may not fall behind his class,
and when he returns home, a de-
tailed report of his work is sent
with him, so that he may receive
credit for it.
"In addition to organized school
work for all children who are able
to carry a program, there is a su-
pervised reading course for all
those who are physically unable to
follow the -work outlined for their
grade, or who do not plan to return
to school. In many cases this course
has served as an inspiration to the
pupil to continue school work, be-
sides proving instructive to him in
itself," she said.
Offer a Commercial Course.
i"A complete commercial course
is offered to pupils classified as
juniors and seniors in high school,
and full credit is given for all fin-
ished work," continued Mrs. Notley.
"The doctors consider thisschool-
work for patients in the hospital
as therapeutic in its value, because
INVITATIONS
AND
PERSONAL CARDS
PRINTED
Long years of experience
Dependable Service
A Red Arrow Place
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State Phone 6615

Four Hours
OF
Milli1Anery
9:00 to 1:00
TODAY
$100
Come in between the hours of
nine and one and pick out one of
these real bargains-all are better
hats, greatly reduced.
ALL SALES FINAL
The Shop of
Personal
Service

I

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_ _----- -- - -- ---- - -- -_ !( I

I

'! ! !

r - T'r"'I^1I'1Y7'P"YY"N'"'I"'P"0'?""I'Y"Y7'+1 "

WILL BE FOUND AT THE
Courtesy of
Fingerle operated

Among the Best and at
Reasonable Prices
FREMAN'S )

"

FRIDAY, DEC. 5
1-9 p. M.

BARBOUR
GYMNASIUM

Saturday, Dec. 6
9-9 p. M.

DINING

% V-wa
i V- tuc)-m

I,. o,,, --- -. _... -I,,

III

HUGE SAVINGS
IN
Musical Merchandise
Prices Slashed from 20% to 50%

Clean, Pleasant and With Excellent Service

ONLY ONE BLOCK NORTH FROM HILL AUDITORIUM

3

r

_.._.. . . ...... .v _ __ .. - l

k.

a' , c Sr. i

V

i \'l
V
E
I II

SPECIAL

III

NEW PURCHASE
LINGERIE
100% PURE SILK
Ordinarily Would Sell at $3.50

fl
I

For Practical Luxury-
. ,
And They're Much Less in Price This Year.!
$7 50- $ai
to
T1RULY the most outstanding of all gifts-
f or every woman wants a fur coat and it's
possible to give such a gift this year without
being spendthrift! Our collection includes
every type of fur from sports to the most regal
of fur evening wraps. This year fashion has
outdone itself in the creation of elegant furs-

li

Musical Instruments
New Gold Trumpet, was $55.00, now .... ......$.$40.00
Used C Melody Saxophone, was $50.00, now ......x$25.00
Bb Clarinet Outfits..................... $17.50
Violin Outfits Greatly Reduced
Gibson Tenor Banjo and Case ... ..... $25.00
Gibson Mandolin, now ....................... . .$22.50
Used $100.00 Maybell Banjo reduced to ......... $30.00
Ukuleles at as much as 20% less.
RADIOS
Majestic Model 131, Brunswick Model 15 at
substantial Reductions.
PIANOS
Good Used Pianos at prices ranging from
$25.00 upwards.
A large supply of sheet Music and Music Books at a generous
discount, some as much as 50% off.
Buy Your Musical Christmas Gifts Now!

III

Gowns
Step-ins

Panties

Chemises

Dance Sets

II

Femininity expressed in every
piece! Daintily lace trimmed,
slightly fitted-of soft pure silk
that contains no artificial weigh-
ing. Buy now for personal needs
-ndfor (Chruitmas gifts too!

yet our prices are lower
years. Give her a check
select it here!
Also a full line of fur n(

by far than in former
for a fur coat-let her
ech pieces and muffs

1

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t
E
t

11!

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