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November 15, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-11-15

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SATIMDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1930

THE MtCHI TANJ

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SERIOUSLY INJURES
ABOUT TO ENTER AUTO

University
Reports

Extension Division
275 High Schools
Entered.

WILL PRESENT

TROPHY

Three Other State-Wide Debate
Scheduled Before Finral
Series Are Held.
More than 275 high schools ir
all parts of Michigan are competin
for the state interscholastic debate
championship in the annual con-
test which is sponsored by the
Michigan High School Debate lea-
gue, an organization which is unde
the general direction of the Uni-
versity extension division.
The subject for all the debates
throughout the year, is "Resolved:
that national chain grocery store
operating in the state of Michigan
are detrimental to the people of
the state."
Plan Elinmination Series.
One set of debates which has al-
ready been held, and three other
state-wide debates on Nov. 21, Dec.
12, and Jan. 9, constitute the four
preliminary debates in which all
schools participate in order to com-
pete for the elimination series of
debates, which will begin on Feb. 20.
The schools with the highest
percentage of victories will be en-
tered in this elimination series.
Each of these schools will receive
the University of Michigan wall-
plaque trophy.
Densmore in Charge.
In this elimination contest, the
schools will debate among them-
selves, with the undefeated schools
dropping out of the contest until
only two undefeated schools re-
main. The representatives of these
two schools will debate on May 1
in Hill auditorium for the inter-
scholastic championship of the
state.
Prof. G. E. Densmore, manager of
the league, expects last year's rec-
ord attendance for the champion-
ship debate to be surpassed this
year, for the Michigan School-
masters club will be in session here
on May 1, and will attend the de-
bate in Hill auditorium.
AVUKAH TO HEAR
SHARFMAN SPEAK
Economics Professor to Discuss
Zionistic Politics.
Prof. I. L. Sharfman, of the eco-
nomics department, will address the
Avukah student organization at
8:15 o'clock Monday night in the
Hillel foundaton building. His topic
will reveal "Recent Developments in
Zionistic Politics."
The recent Simpson report and
the White paper issued by Great
Britain concerning the prohibition
of immigration into Palestine will
be taken up in professor Sharfman's
talk, as will the Balfour declaration
and its meaning.
Herbert Smith, '32D, will deliver
the second paper in the series of
Hillel student forums Sunday night
at the foundation. Discussing "Hy-
brid Judaism," Smith will compare
the factors of modern casual Juda-
ism with the environment and edu-
cational factors that make for a
deep-rooted religion.
SEARS CONDUCTS
PEAT BOG SURVEY
Prof. Paul B. Sears, head of the
botany department at the Univer-
sity of Oklahoma, hasdbeen the
guest of the botany department
here, where he has been engaged
in research on the history of peat
bogs.
He is applying a method, first ap-
plied in Europe, by which a study
is made of the vegetational succes-
sans, as glaciers succeeded, by
means of the microscopic study of
the characteristic pollen grains in

plants that are preserved in past
bogs. This microscopic analysis of
the peat from the top to the bottom
of the bog will give a history of
the changes in vegetation of the
history surrounding the bog.
This a a continuation of work
which Professor Sears began while
he was teaching at the Ohio State
university.

INDIA DEINIIED FINAL
Lord Irwin's Report Replaces
Recommendations Proposed
by Sir Jc4in Simon.
VICEROY GIVEN POWER
(B'v Associated Press)
LONDON, Nov. 14.-:dopes for im-
mediate dominion for India were
dealt another stiff blow today.
Seeking an immediate dominion
status as a minimum concession.
Indian delegates to the roundtable
conference - were presented the
recommendations of the viceroy,
Lord Irwin, and his government,
which forsee a distant day when
a large degree of self-government
will be attained, but meanwhile
envisage only gradual development
toward that end.
The report, which contains 250
pages, will supplement as a basis
for discussion in the roundtable
conference the report and recom-
mendations of the commission of
Sir John Simon on Indian statu-
tory reform, which excited a storm
of protest in Indian Nationalist
circles when published several
months ago.
Although some of the viceroy's
recommendations are in accord
with those of the statutory com-
mission, there are certain marked
divergencies.

What's
Going
On

DISEASE SOCIETY
ENDS CONVENTION
The closing session of the Pedi-
atric and Infection Disease society's
convention will be held this morn-
ing in the University hospital. This
organization, originally composed of
men of the faculty of the Univer-
sity, has since enlarged unti'l it
has become more than state-wide.
The president of the organization
is Dr. William D. Lyon, of Akron, 0.
Election of officers will be the prin-
cipal business of today's meeting.

W. G. Heidergott, mechanics professor at Purdue university, Lafayette, Ind., who was gravely injured
when a mysterious bomb wrecked his garage as he was about to step into his auto.

Theaters.
Lydia Mendelssohn - "Rollo's
Wild Oat," Play Production presen-
tation.
Majestic - "Song of My Heart"
with John McCormack.
Michigan-"Scotland Yard" with
Edmund Lowe and Joan Bennett.
Wuerth - "Wild Company" with
H. B. Warner.
Miscellaneous.
Hill auditorium - Gilbert K.
Chesterton, lecturer, 8 o'clock to-
night.
Union-Dancing from 9 o'clock
until midnight.
League-Dancing from 9 o'clock
until midnight.

Former Bishop of India to Speak
Next Tuesday Before
Open Forum.
KNOWS OF MANY FAITHS
Drawing his convictions on reli-
gion from a knowledge of various
Oriental faiths besildes Christianity.
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, pastor of
the Methodist-Episcopal church of
Ann Arbor and former bishop of
India, will spear before the Open
Forum, discussing an outline of
what he thinks the coriege student's
approach to religion should be, at
4:15 o'clock Tuesday in the Natural
Science auditorium.
Dr. Fsher is definitely opposed to
proselyting a religion upon anyone,
either a liberal minded American
college student or an Oriental well
established in Mohamadanism or
any other eastern faith. Religion,
he continues, has something very
real to offer the individual just as
literature or science has, and it
should be up to the individual to
seek out the church as an agent to
helping him realize his spiritual
impulses just as he seeks out other
professions to help him realize oth-
er desires.
In getting at a religion that suits
the modern college student the
speaker will mentilon the contribu-
tions that have been made by the
recent humanist movement and the
writers of modern literature that
have fostered the idea.
Besides his contacts with students
in India and China, Dr. Fisher has
made many recent contacts with
undergraduate life at Chicago uni-
versity, P2ttsburg university, and
the university of Boston.

STUDENTS' GIFTS
AID YOUNG FUND
Donators Asked to Mail Checks
to Daily Business Manager.
(Continued from Page One)
the University; Alexander P. Ruth-
ven, '32; Prof. Peter Okkelberg;
Mrs. C. A. Vernon; Mrs. J. S.
Reeves; Marian Williams, statisti-
cal assistant, registrar's office;
Mrs. George Huntington; Hugo P.
Thieme, professor of French; Prof.
William H. Hobbs, of the geology
department.
Dean G. Carl Huber, of the Grad-
uate school; Viroqua Lemmon, as-
sistant recorder, Graduate school;
Prof. Hobart R. Coffey, of the Law
school, Dr. F. A. Wahr, Edgar B.
Galloway, '31; Alfred C. Stoddari,
'33 L; Miss Ruth A. Brown, research
assistant, educational investiga-
tions; Dr. A. S. Warthin, professor
of pathology, and Mrs. K. A. War-
thin.
John L. Murphy, '31A; George
Alexander; G. H. Wild, of Wild &
Co.; Tinker Clothing Co.; Alvin R.
Heald, of the "Parrot"; Carl F. Bay,
Bay Jewelry; Peter Van Bove, Inc.;
Charles A. Sink, president of the
School of Music; C. S.Starbuck, of
the "College Inn" and H. Seger
Slif er.
Eillel Dramatic Group
to Give One-Act Plays
The Hillel Players will present
three one-act plays in the Lydia
Mendelssohn theater during the
first week in December.
The one-act plays which are to'
be presented are "The Riders to the
Sea," "The Stepmother," and "The
Guy Upstairs." These plays are be-
ing supervised by three students
assisted by Prof. Nelson of the Eng-
lish department of the engineering
school.

DISCUSS[SH a'..Y
Englishman Discovers Material
of Value for Historical
Research.
STUDIES EARLY AMERICA
"Clements library possesses a vast
store of valuable manuscripts and
books of early American historical
wealth," stated Robert A. Humph-
reys, who has been sent to this Uni-
versity on a Commonwealth fellow-
ship received while a student at
Peterhouse, Cambridge.
Humphreys has been carrying on
his historical research in the Cle-
ments library. He remarked thatj
"the Shelburne Papers" are excep-
tionally fine and has found them tQ
be valuable to his study of PrIy
American history and the affilia-
tions of the Colonies with the Brit-
ish empire.
Along with Mr. Humphreys are
two colleagues who also have been
awarded the Commonwealth fellow-
ship. Reginald William Revans has
been studying in the physics de-
partment and Norman Goodier whti
was here last year is continuing his
work in the engineering college.
The Commonwealth foundation
sends to the leading universities
and colleges in the United States
several exceptional students every
year to carry on their study.
MUSEUM RECEIVES
GIFT OF SKELETON
Receipt of the complete skeleton
of Tursiops, a large genus of por-
poise inhabiting the Atlantic, has
been announced by the University
museum of zoology. The specimen
camefromthe Harvard museum of
comparative zoology.
Nearly 12 feet long, the skeleton,
is mounted for exhibition in the up-
per hall of the museums building as
a part of the teaching museum, now
being arranged there. Its particular
interest lies in the fact that it was
prepared more than 50 years ago
under the direction of Louis Agas-
siz, one of the greatest of American
naturalists and at that time direc-
tor of the museum of comparative
zoology.

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FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, Minister
10:30 A. M.-Morning Worship.
-THE BEST AMERICAN LIFE."
7:30 P. M.-Evening Worship.
"GANDHI AND LONDON."
(Aspects of Round Table Confer-
ence).
Dr. Fisher will preach at both
services.

METHODIST STUDENTS
CENTER
WESLEYAN GUILD
Cor. State and East Huron
12:00 N.--"Comparative Religions."
Sunday school class led by Mrs.
Frederick Fisher.
6:00 P. M.-Ralph Lacey will speak
on the topic: "Norms."
7:00 P. M.-Social Hour.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

I

E. Huron, below
R. Edward Sayles,2
Howard R. Chapman,
Students.

State
Minister
Minister

of

ROBBINS WRITES ABOUT UNIVERSITY
BOOK SYSTEM, QUALITY QUANTITY
Featured in this week's Michigan bird and the Kohinoor or the Taj
Alumnus is another of the series Mahal extreme rarities."

of University "short short stories"
which have been written by Dr.
Frank 1. Robbins for the last sev-
eral years and which appear on
the back cover of each Alumnus
issue. This week's concerns quantity
and quality in the University lib-
rary system.
"The University library has,"
says Dr. Robbins, "more than 750,-
000 volumes and is, necessarily, one
of the great libraries of the coun-
try: But it is a great library, too,
because it includes collections on
special subjects which not only
contain all the usual books on the
subject, but likewise the unusual
books and sometimes the unique
books."
Continuing in his description of
the "libri rariores," Dr. Robbins
tells of the "three little books
whose title pages indicate that
they were all printed before the
revolution." The British museum
catalogue, the Bibliotheque Na-
tionale catalogue, and the Library
of Congress catalogue do not list
any one of them. They belong in
a class "by themselves like the dodo

These three books are part of a
remarkable collection of mathe-
matical, mechanical, and astrono-
mical history books which have
been collected as a result of work
done by several members of the
University faculty in research.

- -

II

ANN ARBOR NEWS-BRIEFS

9:45 A. M.-The Church School.
Mr. Wallace Watt, Superintendent.
10:45 A. M.-The Church Worship.
Mr. Sayles will preach. Topic:
"TRY IT."
12:00 N.-University Class at Guild
House. Mr. Chapman.
5:30 P. M.-Social and friendship
hour.
6:30 P. M.-Devotional meeting.
Topic: "Some Modern Leaders,"
will be presented by three speakers.
BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod of N. A.)
Fourth Ave. between Packard and
Williams
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale
9:00 A. M.-Bible School.
10:00 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "The Discipline of Diffi-
culties.
11:00 A. M.-Service in German.
7:00 P. M. - Young People's
League.

HILLEL FOUNDATION
615 East University
Rabbi Bernard Heller
Sunday Lecture Service 11:15 A. M.
Address by Rabbi Leon Fram, sub-
ject: "Is Palestine a World Prob-
lem."
7:30 P. M.---Student Forum. Ad-
dress by Herbert Smith, subject:
"Hybrid Judaism."

9:00 P. M.-Social Hour.

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I

Authority on Cancer
to Give Lecture Here
Mme. N. Debrovolskaia, one of the
foremost authorities on cancer in
the world, and a member of the
staff of the Paris laboratory of
Mme. Curie, discoverer of radium,
will address members of the Wash-
tenaw County Medical society next
Wednesday in University hospital.
The meeting will be the regular
monthly business meeting, followed

by the lecture, Theron
secretary-treasurer of
society said yesterday.

S. Langford,
the medical

PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
Corona, Underwood,
Barr-Morris, Remington, _
Royals.
We have all makes.
Colored Duco Finishes

0. D. MORRILL
314 South State Phone 6615

THEOSOPHY
Is the body of truths which
forms the basis of all religions,
and which cannot be claimed as
the exclusive possession of any.
Theosophy therefore affirms
that: There is no religion higher
than truth.
Study It
The Theosophical Society
meets Wednesday evenings in
the Michigan League at 8
o'clock. You are welcome.
FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morning Serv.
ice. Sermon topic: "Mortals and
Immortals."
11:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow-
ina .ip mnn;nv pr:-r

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WAMMEW

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Complete Line of Everything Musical

LANE HALL

TAVERN

THE MATCHLESS BALDWIN LINE Of PIANOS
VICTOR, MAJESTIC, BRUNSWICK A-ADIOS
UNEXCELLED MARTIN BAND INSTRUMENTS
Terms to Suit

I

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. at Fifth Ave.
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor
9:00 A. M.-Sunday School.
10:30 A. M.-Service with sermon
by the pastor on "Fellowship in
the Gospel."
4:45 P. M.-Student Studlv honr

1

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