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November 15, 1930 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AGE TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

-INSTEIN TO VISIT UNITED STATES TO CONDUCT IDUNHAIV
RESEARCH WORK AT MOUNT WILSON OBSERVATORY PUBLIC

SATURDAY, NOVEMER 1 30
U U\\ (CURTIS DESCRIBES METEOR SHOWER
WHIC H WILL APPEAR THIS MONTH
[Astronomy Professor Tells of jority of the streaks appear to or-
L I L2 UHistoric Leonid Displays; iginate.
Professor Curtis, advised those
Small Swarm Forseen- who might be interested, to look for
ducational Bulletin, the Leonids by the constellation
Shows Purpose "Between Nov. 14 and 17 the Leo which is located due east about
t Tai. Leonids, a meteor swarm, make half way toward the zenith at 2
t-heir annual appearance," prof. o'clock in the morning. Leo is
NEW PROBLEM Heber D. Curtis, head of the as- shaped like a sickle.
"The value of meteors andime-

.....__._

.

G
4
MS

Foundations of Entire District
Believed Undermined
by Rains.
FIVE BODIES RECOVERED
Firemen, Police and Volunteers
Resume Work; Hospital
May Collapse.

1/1
ti 2
t y 4
...,.}
...................
IN-
1 k"
Prof. Albert Einstein, world famous scientist, will ma visit to the United States early in
December. 11e plans a three months' stay in Californ;, ard wi ve much of his time to research at the
California Institute of Technology and the Mount Wilon observatery (shown above).

Writing in E
Prof evsor
of A406
PRESENTI

ulluc; 11' ing appears to(oe too
widespread. LUUt00 [E[ P ROF [550US
Estimate Loss of Life.
Firemen, police and volunteers at
dawn resumed their excavation of
the ruins of the 10 to 12 houses
lyhich were caught in the land-
slides for the bodies of those who
were buried beneath the tons of Physicist, Astronomer, Realtor
masonry. Will Discuss Problems on
Only five bodies thus far have Michigan Program.
been recovered and only three of gn__r_
these have been identified. Of 15 h
persons taken alive from the debrls Physics, astronomy, and housing
several are seriously injured and problems will be discussed at 7:30
probably will not live. o'clock tonight by prominent facul-
Hard to Reach Bodies. ty members during the University
Estinates on the loss of life range broadcasting program.
from 50 to 100, with the possibility Prof. Floyd irestone, of the phys-
that the real total never will be pr tmtdwill gveaft lph o-
known.' So hazardous is the worl es department, will give a talk on
of excavation that it may be days "Measurement of Sound." Prof. Er-
before many of the bodies are nest M. Fisher, of the business ad-
reaiched.ministration school, will discuss
St. Jean Square today had the "Housing the Poor of Europe." Prof.
appearance of a camp, with long Herbert D. Curtis, who was this year
rows of army trucks, ambulances
and field kitchens arranged to aid appointed head of the University
the excavation crews. observatory and department of as-
tronomy, will discuss "Around the
World to Chase a Shadow."
Dr. A. S. Wart hn Talks Music will be presented by a trio.
Wassily Besekirsky, violinist, for-
a Louisville Meeting merly of the Conservatory of Odes-
sa, Hanns Pick, cellist, formerly of
Dr. Aldred Scott Warthin, direc- the Philadelphia Symphony orches-
tor of the University pathological tra, and Joseph Brinkman, pianist,
laboratories, spoke yesterday after- formerly of the Chicago Symphony
noon on "The Pathology of Latent orchestra, will be the artists. Both
Syphilis" at the twenty-fourth an- Iesekirsky and Pick appeared with
nual meeting of the Southern Medi- the Rhode Island trio. These musi-
cal association, which has been in. clans are all recent additions to the
session the past few days at Louis- School of Music faculty and are the
ville, Ky. respective heads of the departments
Dr. Warthin has been invited to Of violin, cello, and piano.
deliver the eleventh annual Pasteur r. y
lecture of the Medical institute of Profesor of History
Chicago on Nov. 21, it was announc- Writes of French Era
?d yesterday. The lecture will be
given at the University of Chicago. "The Anglo-French T r e a t y of
"Problems in Latent Syphilis" will Commerce of 1860 and The Prog-
be the subject of Dr. Warthin's dis- ress of the Industrial Revolution in
cussion, a mediCal field in which France," is the title of a recent book
he has achieved international emi- by Prof. Arthur Louis Dunham, of
nence. the history department.

ENGINEERING SCHOOL POSSESSES
ONLY COLLEGE NAVAL TEST TANK
Practical Research Carried Out was an investigation made for the
by Faculty and Students designers of the racing yacht Weet-
amoe, which was one of the boats
Along Many Lines. built to race Sir Thomas Lipton's
Shamrock.
One of the two naval testing Most of the testing work is done
tanks in the country, and the only for companies that have already
one in a college is possessed by determined upon the design of their
the University engineering schools, ship and want to know the power
investigation and interviews in the needed to drive t. A little prelimi-
Engineering building disclosed yes- nary work, stated Profesosr Bragg,
Prof. Edward M. Bragg, specialist might save five to ten per cent of
in marine engineering and in naval the power needed. Much experi-
architecture, regularly carries out menting has been done for the fed-
Seal shipping board as well s for

I ronomy cdepartmntuand. the ou
"Popular eclucation tends to re- servatcry declatred yesterday. z1
fleet the world of affairs," says "No spc illy striking display of i
Prof. Fred S. Dunham. of the Uni- the N )vm1er Leonids is expected o
versity High school, in an article this year, but those who study me- e
fortheNoz.tuer ;;ae f tneI Icors will be on watch for a few b
for the Nov.mber irsde 0 tile nights before and after Nov. 16, to e
School of Education Bulletin which secure data as to any possible r
was released yesterday. slight increase in numbers which x
He states that ruantity produc- may give an indication as to t
Lion, which is present during peri- whether we may be approaching e
ods of pronounced prosperity, finds st portion of the
its "counterpart" in courses taught'a somewhat denser prtis ofid.e
in schools. At the present time, swarm," Professor Curtis said.
however, employers are looking for . Wornderfum displays of "shoot-
men with a sound general educa- ng stars" were seen in Novem-
tion that they may train them in ber, 1833, and again in 1366. There
the technical and more specific bus- was no display worth the name in
mess L'nes. 1899 as the number recorded at
"Again," he says, "varying cco- that timcanbe seenver on any much larght
nomic conditions and changes in or tha can Asenon any nirt
methods of production frequently of the year. Although the earth
render specialization in high schools nases through the Leonids an-
wasteful or futile. Conspicuous eco- nually, the maximum cycle of the
nomic factors which have necessi- swarm appears to be about every
tated a change in eimphasis in see- 3 years and four months. Statis-
ondary education arc in general, tically, this means that the Leon-
higher standards of living , t h ids wail approach another one of
standards of life lagging far be_ its maximum points in 1932 or
hind." 1933."
iHe also states that specialization "The Leonids travel with a velo-
in industry has given the secondary city of about 46 miles a second and
schools the task of broadening the have a bluish color. The average
child's interest ih1 life and of awak- height at which they first become
ening his appreciation of social val- visible is 80 miles and they usually
ues. disappear at a height of 54 miles."
"Therefore," he says, "the new "It is useless to try to use a tele-
education must keep two things scope or even an opera glass on
clearly in mind: first, that the in- these swiftly-vanishing objects. As-
dividual needs an education for a tronomers in general attempt no
24-hour day and not for an eight- observations of 'shooting stars' but
J-'nlr job: and second, that the in- leave such work to amateurs.
dividual's social responsibilities and The only apparatus needed," Pro-
neeas are greater today than ever fessor Curtis said, "is a star chart
before." pinned to a board, a lead pencil, an
inexhaustible supply of patience
UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON and a knowledge of the stars."
-In an attempt to establish a new Observers plot the paths of these
"tradition," Pan-Hellenic and other "shooting stars" on their star maps
campus organizations are support- and can thus calculate the radiant;
ing a movement to compel fresh- of the swarm, that is, the point in
man women to wear green ribbons. the sky from which the great ma-
Ch-C
'~.
COSS
v' .tI

eor showers is purely theoretical.
The observation of them has aided
n determining the height to which
ur atmosphere extends above the
earth. They are supposed to be the
bones of dead comets which now
exist as a long swarm of minute
particles spread out along the
paths along which the comet used
to move," Professor Curtis conclud-
ed.
LEAGUE TO HEAR
VEGETARIAN TALK
Dr. Buenaventura Jimenez, of the
Health Service, will be -the speaker
at the fourth of the Tolstoy leagues
series of lectures at 4:15 o'clock,
next Tuesday, in room 231, Angell
hall. His subject will be "The
Dawning Era's Corpse-less Diet."
"This will continue the idea of
the series, which attempts to con-
sider the future of mankind, sup-
porting the popular belief that
vegetarianism will eventually be
adopted by all sects," said Dr.
Francis S. Onderdonk, of the col-
lege of architecture, chairman of
the league. "Vegetable diets have
increased very much in recent
years."

BRIGHT SPOT
802 PACKARD STREET
TODAY, 5:30 to 7:30
SHORT STEAKS
OR
PORK CHOPS
FRIED POTATOES
TOMATOES
35c
WE DELIVER
PHONE 8241

I

Senus II m1 le Uv t Gll. ll
oretical and practical research andI
instruction are conducted by both
students and faculty under his
supervision. A recent achievement
ALUMNI PROPOSE
STUDENTS' ROOMf
Alumni of the University who are
members of the Chemists' club, In
New York City, propose to furnish a
special room for transient members
of the club from the Michigan
chapter, according to a letter re-
ceived from Charles A. Lunn, '11,
and W. G. Gesell, '11, who are in
charge of the arrangements. E
The entire club house is now un-
dergoing extensive a 1 t e r a t i o n s.
Alumni of other universities are al-
so planning to furnish rooms in
accordance with the plan being fol-
lowed by the Michigan group.
Lunn stated in his letter that the
room will be decorated in accord-
ance with the traditions of the
U n i v e r s i t y, and particularly in
keeping with the chemical engt-,
neering department. They plan to
subscribe to The Daily, Gargoyle,
Technic, and Alumnus, he said. 1

other ocean and Great Lakes ship-
builders. Recently a considerable
amount of money was saved for an
official of a large industrial corpor-
ation as a result of research on a
proposed application of fins or hori-
zontal rudders to lessen the rolling
of a motor yacht.
The naval tank is located i'n the
'West Engineering building, where it
occupies nearly the entire length
of the ground floor of one wing. Its
capacity is 16,000 barrels of water;
it is 100 yards long, 22 feet wide
and 10 feet deep. A novel feature
of the campus fire-fighting service
allows this body of water to be used
E in emergencies, inasmuch as the
tank has a capacity equal to one-
half that of the city reservoir.
The ship models used are fairly
large, measuring from eight to
twelve feet in length. Their size
thus allows for exact construction
from paraffin. Clay moulds are
made and filled with the waxy sub-
stance. The rough, wood model is
then cut to shape by a machine
1 which duplicates the lines of pre-
pared drawings. Ballast is added to
bring the model to the desired wa-
I terline.

r

I

I -

RQ"' :
F'^-
h'. R.

-I

f Alb MPM

Con
1:30

Double Feature Program
Frank Aibertson-H. B. Warner
in
"WiLD COMPANY"
The story of a father who gave the stern law his son
murder. Then stood by the boy though it disgraced their
-EXTRA FE:ATURE
CHARLIE MURRAY

tinuous
hows
a, 11:00
wer for
s name.
epic of

NOW
PLAYING
Sunday
1:30 to 11:00

to ans
family'

in
IN WALL STREET"
the Wall Street crash! The hilarious

s
_- _

TI
TO]
This
M
An

ID7

r
"Scotland 'ard"
with
EDMNUNtD LOWE AND JOAN BENNETT

picture is different-a superb drama of the str
love and adventure story ever filmed.

The following shorts complete an evening of rea
entertainment.
THE COCKOO "CURIOSITIES" PICTURES OF
URDER CASE" "PATHE REVIEW" MC AI
excellent cartoon "METRO NEWS" GAME

angest
THE
N-

_

By Force of Arms!
Hilarious happenings behind
the scenes-with the much-
married "IT" girl and her
two jealous husbands!
LARA
b_
sght"
)i aramount c jicture

Added
Al Cooke
~FRESHMANS
GOAT"
Paramount
Talking
News

I

with
Ralph Forbes
Charlie Ruggles

I

I

1111

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