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November 01, 1930 - Image 4

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-11-01

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PAGE FOUYR

THE l MT'1-IC.AMfDAIL.Y

IQ A rmTVn ~ A V V"#UYZ5*,, a at.fl

., a ., a a a .. a a a.,s a * , saa f [ Fl*L U1YC4.

JAY, NuvEmublt 3, 'lwu

, . - - - -

Published every morning except Monday
luring the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
iner thie paper and the local news published
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May
hard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY
City Editor
Frank E. Cooper
News Editor...............Gurney Williams
Editorial Director...........Walter W. Wilds
S ports Editor ......;: ....Joseph A. Russell
Women's Editor....... ..Mary L. Behymer
Music and Drama.........William J. Gorman
Assistant City Editor'......arold 0. Warren
Assistant News Editor...Charles R Sprowl
Telegraph Editor .George A. Stauter
NIGHT EDITORS
S. Beach Conger John D. Reindel
Carl S. Forsythe Richard L. Tobin
David M. Nichol Harold O. Warren
Sports Assistants
Sheldon C. Fullerton J. Cullen Kennedy.
Robert Townsend
Reporters
Walter S. Baer, Jr. Parker Terryberry
[rvidg J. Bluimberg Robert L. Pierce
Donald 0. Boudemian Wini. P. Pyper
rhomas M. Cooley Slier M. Quraishi
George Fisk Jerry E. Rosenthai
Morton Frank George Rubenstein
Saul Friedberg Charles A. Sanford
Frank B. Gilbreth Karl Seiffert
Jack Goldsmith Robert F. Shaw
Roland Goodman Edwin M. Smith
James H. Inglis George A. Stauter
enton C. Kunze Alfred R. Tapert
Powers Moulton Tohn S. Townsend
Wilbur J. My ers Robert D. Townsend

and Germany as a cultural and
intellectual center.
Michigan is one of the universi-
ties in the country which has en-
couraged the matriculation of for-
eign students. Nearly every course
in the University has several stud-
ents from foreign countries enroll-
ed. For the most part they come to
the university to obtain credit, and
not merely to receive a cultural
background. They are here to learn
the tricks of mass production, ad-
vanced commercialism, and the
various complexities of trade and
industry through which the United
States is said to have taken the
world leadership.
Michigan and other American
universities, through the tutelage
of these students who will become
leaders in their countries, are play-
ing an important part in the trend
of human affairs, the effect of
which would be hard to determine
at this time. However, the fact that
our educational institutions are
faced with a new and ever-increas-
ing demand must not be over-
looked. The full significance of the
responsibility must always be kept
in mind. That the results will be
far-reaching can not be doubted.

Campu
Contributors ai
confining themsel
words if possib
munications will
names of commat
he regarded as
quest. Letterss p
construed as exj
opinion of The D

s Opinion
asked to heabrief,
!\es to less than goo
le. Anonymous corn
the disregarded. The
unicanits will, however,
confidential, upon re-
ublished should not be
pressing the editorial
Eaily.
1L THEOLOGY.

Lynne Adams
Betty Clark
Elsie Feldman
Elizabeth Gribble
Tmily G. Grimes
Elsie M. Hoffmeye
Jean Levy
Dorothy Magee
Mary McCall

Margaret O'Brien
Eleanor Rairdon
Jean Rosenthal
Cecilia Shriver
Frances Stewart
er Anne Margaret Tobin
Margaret Thompson
Claire Trussell
Barbara Wright

PRACTICA

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
T. HOLLISTER MABLEY
Assistant Manager -
KASPER H. HALVERSON
Department Managers
Advertising .................Charles T. Kline
Advertisi,..............Thomas M. Davis
Advertising.............William W. Warboys
Service...............Norris J. Johnson
Publication ........... Robert W. Williamson
Circulation.... ......Marvin S. Kobacker
Accounts... .............Thomas S. Muir
Business Secretary ............Mary J. enan
Assistants
Harry R. Begley Donald W. Lyons
Vernon Bishop William Morgan
Wliam f Ril" T FeSchafe

When Mr. Boesche slid from hisI
earlier stupidity and abominable
rheoric to mud-slinging, his note'
hurt very much. While it increased
my respect for him as a practical
theologian, it caused me to despair
for either his intelligence or my
writing. The sole purpose of my1
previous letter was to point out to
the Student Christian Association
the effect of the ill-prepared clap-
trap of its president. I merely
wished to help the association to
guard the dignity of its name and

Ki 1
OASEDROLL
ONLY
SEVEN MORE
DAYS.
The great day is almost at hand!
Seven more days until the next
week-end. Amazing how time does
fly, isn't it? Not only that, but
there are only something like fifty-
six groups of twenty-four hours
left before the old man will be
trying to convince our youn'ger
brothers that that pillow in his
stomach makes him into the patron
saint of the popcorn ball and the
five-and-ten-cent store 'imported
vase'.
. * * *
This Newberry Auditorium
Business is getting positively
insulting. They haven't even
started to paint the thing.
Hereafter, every true b I u e
Michigan Man, Woman or Pro-
fessor will, if they have any
decency at all, wet their fingers
and rub out as much of the
dirt on the walls as is possible
before class starts. When they
see us wearing our fingers to
the bone for old Michigan (not
to mention threatening the
destruction of the building by
removing its supporting en-
crustation of d i r t) maybe
they'll sic the B & G Boys on
it, and make the Campus an
honest Woman.
PRIZE AWARD!!
The Weekly Rolls Award issued
by the Anti Coed campaign fund
has been given this week to the
gent who whizzed into Angell hall
yesterday just in time to complete
the havoc that a young and gay
coed had wrought upon what might
have been a fair looking nose when
not hidden by a cascade of oat-
meal or whatever it is that coeds
use on their noses. I don't believe
I have ever seen a prettier stroke
than the one he executed with that
unwieldy door. It's timing like that
that distinguishes the 'Top-Notch-
ers' from other notchers-and I'll
shoot the first hound that says it's
notch so!
It has been suggested to me
that I go out and ring doorbells
on the night set aside for this
purpose, but, in this age of
sophistication, Hallo ween know
when the time comes? Don't
shoot boys, I don't like it either,
but we can't all be funny.
Dear Dan:
Much obliged for the space. In
trying times like these, color, race,
and creed should be forgotten for
the good of the cause. Are we Mice
or are we Men?
The coed, like the old Saloon,
must go. I stepped into a flock of
the Vermin over at the Union to-
day, while putting the nod on this
paper, and, with all its faults, you
never saw an old Saloon wandering
around The Union's sacred corri-
dors. Did you now? (No, but if
wishes were horses I would have .. .
D. B.) All of which, as Sex Guinan
would say, proves something. With
your space and My brains, quien
sabe?
Frank.

SIC AND DRA
MI;DRMA
CHORAL UNION CONCERT
A Review by William J. Gorman.
Last nights Choral Union con-
cert achieved some sort of record
-in being unbelievably unmusical.
Mr. Lion gasped his way through
a Bach Polonaise and Badinerie.
Mr. de Bourguignon's sloppy pas-
sage-work in the Saint-Saens Al-
legro and his wild thumping in the
Ride of the Valkyries suggested the
pianist at the old Arcade.
Then there was Madame Clair-
bert. One admired her stage man-
ner. Her informality was very
pleasant; especially in the light of
the Ponselle fluffiness and prima-!
donnaism. Unfortunately, however,
her approach to the music seemed
to parallel this leaning on the
piano. She pushed herself off the
piano into the music and continued
to be indifferent. Madame Clair-
bert betrayed no particular interest
in herself as an artist (that is, as a
sensitive woman), in her voice as
an expressive instrument, or in the
music as anything but a mildly
tantalising task. There really was
no respect for her profession, no
awareness of the problems in pro-
jecting a song. Madame Clairbert
seemed thoroughly satisfied with}
the communication of a shallow,
slightly coy, thoroughly unmusi-
cal temperament.
This was particularly disappoint-
ing after the very promising dis-
play of technique in the first vir-
tuoso piece. Madame Clairbert,
there, was an agile coloratura with
an adequately elegant delivery. The
program absolutely failed to make
any significant use of this techni-
que.
Two of the numbers in the first
group were inconsequential. Ex-
cept in the coloratura passages, she
was clearly incapable of singing
Mozart correctly. She didn't have
the intelligence to grasp Mozart's
ordered, intricate gracefulness. The
one aspect of technique (homo-
geneity of tone-quality in various
registers and intensities) necessary
to mozartean fluencyshenentirely
lacked.
Her coloratura in the second
group was only mildly interesting.
Galli-Curci in her prime rendered
coloratura passages as arabesque:
that is, in lovely form. Miss Clair-
bert hasn't the intellect or the in-
terest in the music for this. Her
coloratural is merely casual decor-
ation. And in spite of the rumours
of the success of her Violetta in
San Francisco, the final aria from
La Travietta proved undramatic.

I

Furniture apd Floor
Coverings
Westinghouse
Refrigerators and
Radios
STANGER FURNITURE
West Liberty

First Church of Christ, Scientist, Ann Arbor, Mich.

announces a

Free Public Lecture on christian Science
by
FRANK BELL, C. S. B.
New York City
Member of The Board of Lectureship of The Mother Church, The First
Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts.
In Masonic Temple, Fourth Avenue
Sunday Evening, November 2, 1930
at Eight O'clock
THE PUBLIC IS CORDIALLY INVITED TO ATTEND

I" l

Complete Line of Everything Musical

( ; 1,

THE MATCHLESS BALDWIN LINE Ol1 PIANOS
VICTOR, MAJESTIC, BRUNSWICI q AADIOS
UNEXCELLED MARTIN BAND INSTRUMENTS
Terms to Suit

I IL

UNIVERSITY
MUSIC HOUSE
William Wade Hinshaw
Devoted to Music
Cor. Maynar-d & William
Phone 7515

wiam no n a re a cn ee ~- -t
Robert Callahan Richard Stratemeier am rewarded with more abortive
William W. Davis Noel D. Turner
Richard H. Hiller Byron C. Vedder bombast and a lot of silly questions.I
Erie Kightlinger!
Marian Atran Mildred Postal Now, after the second letter, it -is
Helen Bailey Marjorie Rough a bit late to have regard for dig-
osephine Convisser Ann W. Verner nity.
Dorothy Laylin ?Mary E. Watts niy
Sylvia Mller Johanna Wiese To cull out the intelligible ques-
Helen Olsen
tion from the mass of pseudo-So-
craticism at the close of Mr.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1930 Boesche's latest bid for fourth
page publicity: "Have we served
Night Editor-BEACH CONGER, Jr. the religious demands of the tran-
sient student body in the best pos-
SANS FORMALISM. I sible manner?" I believe, with Mr.
Probably by this time every fra- Boesche, the number of students
actively interested in worship to be
ternity on the campus has received very small. If, as he says: "'the
a communication from the Student citizens of Ann Arbor can be served
Christian association announcing just as satisfactorily in their own
their plan for Student-Faculty churches," it would seem that this
dinners. May we take this opp;or-small number of students could
diners. M wherughy takends oor also be satisfactorily served by lo-
tuniy to thoroughly commend their cal churches. I believe that that
idea as one of the constructive is the case. As a matter of theory,
steps that has been taken to give the local churches with their re-
the student the value of that inti- latively small and intimate con-
mate conversational approach to gregations would seem to be a more
some of the more vigorous minds ideal unit of worship than the
larger convocation, which seems by
among our faculty population. contrast rather as a divine pep
Perhaps the most subtle and meeting. If the local churches
really effective way of trainihg or were unable to accomodate the re-
guiding young men is by exposing ligiously interested students, spon-
them to the influenceof an active soring convocations would be a fine
thinker who is unconsciously and thing, but as things stand the S. C.
spontaneously displaying his vigor A. seems to be foaming at and
and agility of mind. The two great through the mouth because there
universities of England, Cambridge really is nothing for it to do.-
and Oxford depend almost wholly Considering the convocations as
upon the tutorial system of teach- they stand, they seem to be more
ing, which puts instruction on an impressive as they resemble Ora-
informal conversational basis. The torical association lectures and get

* * *

idea is undoubtedly spreading in
this country for its value needs no,
proof.
Perhaps at this point a few hard'
headed demagogues will answer
that they are getting paid only for
the time they consume in the rou-
tine of formal class work, and that
what time remains to them they
would not desire to waste in idle
discourse with a group of under-
graduates. A certain amount of this
feeling is perhaps to be expected
and is quite excusable. However,
it has been found that the really
top notch, faculty men welcome
these opportunities to make a
frank acquaintance with the boys
whose customary attitude toward
their instructors is apt to be one
of bluffing.
In short the Student-Faculty
dinner idea is to be encouraged as
a tendency in the direction of tak-
ing some of the unthinking form-
alism out of the college routine,
and making the campus population
a congenial host of thinking indi-
viduals.

away from religion. It strikes me
that campus support of such lec-
tures would be more efficiently ex-
ploited if effort were concentrated
on one series. And again, many of
the convocations are ludicrously
incongruous. In particular I re-
call a lucid and authoritative ex-
position of world armament sand-
wiched between prayers and spirit-
ual anthems two years ago.
I don't think that the S. C. A.
can do anything about religious
inactivity more t h a n squirting
vinegar at the indifferent. After
all a person's religion is usually
the result of his background. Christ-
tian associations can achieve pro-
gress (in their eyes) by affecting
the environment of persons in the
formative period, but collegiate as-
sociations come a bit late for the
missionary work they attempt.
All of which leaves the S. C. A.
precisely nothing to do, which is
no news. I have heard of an in-
tention to convert Lane Hall into
a foreign students' dormitory. That
would fill the vacuum and still

i
J
it
k

Oooohooo Daa-aan,
Wait for me-hee. Look! It's Booth
no it's McNamee-well, folks that
was a swell touch-down and you
ought to see the sunset-but I can't
figure out who that was that made,
it, o yes, God, no that's the sunset
not the play. The crowd's yelling
it now. WHY IT'S WILLIE! ! !
Your little note touched me, Dan,
touched me deeply. And I do bruise
so easily.
See by the classifieds that a com-
pact with a diamond setting on the'
cover has been lost. That beats the
goose that layed the golden eggs,
and the reproducing victrola. I'll
double any reward offered.
Have decided to put a camp-stool
on the front porch for the Harvard
game, saving car fare and Harry
T. the bother. All I need is 3 coeds.
trying to take the seat away from
me and a drunk to pound me on
the back and bum my cigarettes
for atmosphere.
Willie.
* *: *
The Dream of my life! Willie and
Frank on the same column! But
Willie, if you didn't smoke those
lousy Cigarettes people wouldn't
borrow them for atmosphere.
* * -*

STOKOWSKI'S BRAHMS
BRAHMS: Symphony No. 2 in D
major: played by Leopold Stokovv-
ski and the Philadelphia Symphony
Orchestra: Victor Musical Master-
piece Series No. 82,
Mr. Stokowski's superb orchestra
could be no better employed than
in Brahms. One could almost have
predicted this from the nature of
other of his performances. Victor
has now given us his performances
of symphonies one, two, and three.
One would then have almost
everlastingly stimulating music.
For there is a consistent air of
novelty about anything that Mr.
Stokowski does. His intelligence is
so provocative, his musicianship so
thorough, his orchestra so compe-
tent, his individuality so superbly
confident that one enjoys his work
even when there is disagreement.
Stokowski realizes all his inten-
tions perfectly. We delight in the
perfection and study the inten-
tions: the latter task being possible
only with records.
In interpretation of Brahms,
Stokowski refused to be swayed by
the cant about Brahms' "austerity
and coldness." His Brahms is in-
tensely emotional: thoroughly the
romanticist, though a thoughtful
one. Several people call his reading
of the First Symphony "russianiz-
ing." Stokowski, they say, gives the
emotions.of Brahms something like
the revival-meeting quality of those
of Tchaikovsky.
Actually, I think he is only in-
tensifying the existent in Brahms:
that is, discovering Brahms more
profoundly. S t o k o w s k i makes
Brahms less the austere musiclJ
thinker, more the impassioned ly-
ricist.
In doing so, it is quite possible
that he amplifies. There seem to
be too many enormous masses of
tone, too much gorgeous color. But
if these are exaggerations, Stokow-
ski adjusts them to one another
with an uncanny and convincing
feeling for proportion. His canvas
may be extended; but it is consist-
ent. The similarity of his reading
of the Brahms Second, issued by

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
"or. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, Minister
10:30 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"THE MAN WHO LOST." (A
searching study in character an-
alysis).
7:30 P. M.-Evening Worship.
"THE LIFE OF RABIN-
DRANATH TAGORE." (A very
intimate picture of the great In-
dian Poet.)
Dr. Fisher will preach at both
services.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
E. Huron, below State
R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister of
Students.
9:45 A. M.-The Church School.
Mr. Wallace Watt, Superintendent.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship. Mr.
Savles will preach on "RELIGION
AS HELP."
12:00 Noon-The University Stu-
dents' class meets at Guild House.
Mr. Chapman in charge.
5:30 P. M.-Friendship Hour for
all. Eats.
6:30 P. M.-Mr. Jesse Wilson of
New York, formerly a missionary
in Japan now Secretary of the
Student Volunteer Movement of
America, will be the guest and
speaker.
BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod of N. A.)
Fourth Ave. between Packard and
Williams
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale
9:00 A. M.-Bible School.
10:00 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "The Church's One
Foundation."
11:00 A. M.-Service in German.

6:00 P. M.-Devotional
led by Rolland Voight.
7:00 P. M.-Social Hour.

METHODIST STUDENTS
CENTER
WESLEY GUILD
Cor. State and East Huron
12:00 N.-"Comparative Religions."
Sunday school class led by Mrs.
Frederick Fisher.

)
.

FIRST-To form a nucleus of the
aty, withou distincton of rHe
creed, sex, cast or color.
SECOND-To encourage the study
of comparative religion, philosophy
TH -To investigate the unex-
plained laws of nature and the
powers latent in man.
Study It.
Thoe thepi: oit et
Wedesday evenings nthe Mich
gan League at 8 o'clock. You are
welcome.

HILLEL FOUNDATION
615 East University
Rabbi Bernard Heller
Sunday Lecture Service 11 A. M.
Held at the Women's League.
Address by Rabbi Bernard Heller.
Subject: "Is Organized Religion
Baneful or Beneficial?"
7:30 P. M.-Student Forum. Paper
by Sam Kellman.
8:30 P. M.-Social Hour.

Meeting

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, University Pastor
Mrs. Nellie B. Cadwell, Counsellor of
Women.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "The Divine Art of Pa-
tience."
12:00 Noon-Student Classes
5:30 P. M.--Social Hour for Young
People. r
6:30 P. M.-Young People's meet-
ing. Speaker: Rev. Sigmund A.
Bychinsky. At the Church House,
1432 Washtenaw Avenue.
5:30-7:30 P. M.-Supper and De-
votional and Discussion group for
Graduate Students, Business and
Professional Young People.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister
Sunday, November 1, 1930
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon topic: "No One to Help."
9:30 A. M.-Church School. Illus-
trated talk on "Early Hebrew His-
tory."
5:30 P. M.--Student Fellowship
social half hour.
6:00 P. M.-Fellowship Supper.
6:30 P. M.-Dr. Clarence Yoakum,
Vice President of the University
will speak on "University Offerings
in Education."
ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Streets
Reverend Henry Lewis, Rector
Reverend Duncan E. Mann, Assistant
8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion.
9:30 A. M.-Holy Communion.
(Student Chapel at Harris Hall.)
9:30 A. M.-Church School. (Kin-
dergarten at 11 o'clock.)
11:00 A. M.-Holy Communion;
sermon by Mr. Lewis.

7:00 P. M. - Young
League.

People's

6:00 P. M.-Student Supper
Harris Hall.
7:45 P. M.-Even Song and
dress.

in
ad-

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. at Fifth Ave.
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor
9:00 A. M.-Reformation sermon in
the German Language.
10:30 A. M.-Service with sermon
by the pastor on the "Reformation
and Evangelical Freedom."

1I

11

i
.

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morning Serv-
ice. Sermon topic: "Everlasting
Punishment."
11:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow-

IT

11

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Third and West Liberty Sts.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor
REFORMATION SUNDAY
9:00 A. M.--German Service.

Dear Dan:
Then, of course, there is
one that appeared on

the
page

I

11

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