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November 01, 1930 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-11-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SAU DAY" 5 VY LM k 1.,4MO

THE MICIIICAN DAILY

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FIRST LEAGUE TEAT
HONORS FRESHMEN,
ADISERS FAUT

Each Organized House
as Hostess at One
During Year.

Will Act
Tea

PLAN ENTERTAINMENT
Social Chairmen of Groups Will
Meet League Committee
to Arrange Schedule.
Inaugurating the League social
season, an informal tea in honor
of freshmen, new students, and
faculty advisors will be given Fri-
day afternoon, November 7, from
4 to 6 'o'clock in the ballroom of
the League building. Plans are
being made for at least 400 guests.
It is the aim of the League to have
entire freshman groups, complete
with their faculty and student ad-
visors attend the tea; as a reward
a special entertainment will be
provided later for all the groups
that are complete.
League Changes Plan of Teas.
This is the first of a series of
parties to be given every two weeks
by the League; each organized
house on campus will act as host-
ess at one. This is a new departure
of the League and of an experi-
mental nature, its purpose being to
create campus-wide interest in
student teas. More variety can be
achieved than when the same
group plans every party, and a
wider group of women can thus
be reached. Houses will be allowed
considerable leeway in planning
teas, though the League social
committee will have the privilege
of making final arrangements,
providing the orchestra, and order-
ing refreshments. An orchestra for
dancing wil be engaged for each
tea.
Faculty Women are Invited.
The system of allowing houses
to give League parties will not be
employed in the first party. This
will be entirely managed by the
League social committee, of which
Jeannie Roberts, '32, is chairman.
There will be no receiving line,
however, as a real note of inform-
ality is the aim of the committee.
Invitations to Friday's party
have been issued to faculty advis-
ors. The League wishes all faculty
women to attend not only this
party, but every one- that is given.
In this way students are given an
opportunity to meet their instruct-
ors informally.
A meeting of all social chairmen
of organized houses with the League
committee will be held Wednesday
afternoon at 5 o'clock in the Lea-
gue building. Miss Ethel McCor-
mick, of the physical education
department will speak.
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN--
Prof. S. A. Leonard of the English
department recently defended a
number of supposedly illiterate ex-
pressions. Among those which he
maintained were correct are: we
will try and get it; who are you
looking for?; there was a bed, a
dresser, and two chairs in the room;
can I be excused from this class?;
and many others.

RAILROAD ELECTS
WOMAN CHAIRMAN,
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Mr. W. B. Thompson,
Following the death of her hus-
band, Col. William Boyd Thompson,
mining engineer and banker of
New York city, Mrs. Thompson was
elected chairman of the board of
the Magna Arizona railroad.
STUDENT ADVISOR
ORGANIZES GROUP
Miss Ellen Gammach Discusses
Religion in Student Life.

PRACTICE CLASSES!
WILL AIDTRIOUTS
Dance Chairmen of Junior Girls'
PNay to Supervise Classes
in Limbering.
TO MEET TWICE A WEEK
Classes in limbering and stretch-
ing will begin next week for all wo-
men who plan to try out for the
Junior Girls' Play. There will be
two meetings a week, each for two
different groups of women.
The first group will meet from
3:30 to 4:30 o'clock on Tuesday and
Thursday afternoons, while the
second group will meet from 4:30
to 5:30 o'clock on the same days.
The classes will be held in Barbour
gymnasium for three weeks, and in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall for the
remaining three weeks.
Lynn Adams and Lois Sandler,
co-chairman ofhthdance ommit-

AMERICAN
INTEREST

WOMEN DOMTRI MR
L Is Uni nairru Lnr nnnu

i

A4rtist Lazes operatic as Well as j R LV LL RI1UNi
Concert Einging. E
"American women interest me a Helen Newberry, Martha Cooke
great deal. They are so ambitious and Mosher Jordan, Enjoy
and much more active than Euro-Celebrations.
pean women," stated Madame C
Clare Clairbert, prima donna, who GIVE SPECIAL DINNERS
appeared last night at Hill Audi-
torium. "I have particularly no- To celebrate the Halloween sea-
ticed that there are more well- son special dinners were given at
dressed women in America than inI Martha Cooke and Mosher-Jordan
my country. Only our wealthy class and Helen Newberry dormitories on
can afford stylish clothes, but here, nd H en dri e ngs
prices are so reasonable that wo-
men of the middle class are able F 'iy ran high at Martha Cooke
of he idle las ae alewhen the students on Thursday
to have attractive wardrobes as well night entered the dining room in
as those who are more fortunate
financially," she added. os ngeiou inventdescrip Tou
"I like t.o sing "or American the courses skits were given to the
audiences," said Miss Clairbert. Itturssripsergethe
dpes take a great deal of effort to pros a
win them over, but they are very lers.
responsive, once their enthusiasm A group of new students present-'
is aroused." ed a stunt called the Order of
Miss Clairbert said that she High Mucky Mucks," in which they
greatly prefers opera to concert staged a sketch of the ordeals of a
singing, chiefly because she enjoys typical initiation into the zecret
acting. She is a very fine actress orders.
and has been praised by many cri- I Awards were offered for the clev-
tics for her dramatic interpreta- erest and the most attractive cos-
tions of operatic roles. "La Trav- tume. Adele Mysen, dressed as an
iata" is Miss Clairbert's favorite organ grinder, walked off with the
opera because it abounds in dra- prize for the cleverest costume and
matic opportunities. Kapilia Khamdbala an Indian stu-
It is interesting to notethatsMiss dent dressed in nature costume
Clairbert won high honors in claimed the prize for the most
mathematics in her scholastic beautiful costume.
career at Brussels. She also studied Mosher-Jordan and Helen New-
English and speaks it very fluently. berry celebrated on Friday night.
The artist is a coloratura soprano The functions were much the same
of unusual ability and her success as the earlier event. At Mosher-
has been almost phenomenal in the Jordan the entertainment was of-
last two years. She was known as fered by the fifth floor girls of
"Madame la Coloratura" until her Mosher hall. They are presenting
identity was recently revealed as a slice from behind the scenes of
Clare Clairbert, of le Theatre de la a scenario entitled "Betty Coed al
Monnaie of Brussels. Michigan." Women spent most 01
their time in devising clever cos-
CARLETON COLLEGE-The only tumes and the skits were amusing
college department of biography in but not of quite so portentous a
the United States was established quality as the attempts of the
here this year. other two dormitories.

Practice Teaching
Mark Is Stressed
The success of many a student in
obtaining a good teaching position
after graduation is dependent upon
the grade received for her prac-
tice teaching. Such is the opinion
of Dr. C. 0. Davis, of the School of
Education. Dr. Davis stated that
the basis for grading this practice
teaching includes many things.
In order to be a good teacher,
women must have personality; that
is, shehmustbecapable. "She must
Liknow how to dress fairly decently,
to hold her end in conversation;
she must have enthusiasm, like
boys and girls, and enter into their
interests wholeheartedly. She must
also have good health and vitality."
"It is unfortunate," states Dr.
Davis, that so many women are
taking up English and History as
the field is becoming overcrowded.
There are not enough students pre-
paring to teach art, commercial
subjects, dramatics a n d public
speaking, and music."

INTER CLASS H 0CKEY
SCHEDULEdPNNEDL
Tournament to Open Thursday
With Five Teams Entered.
for First Time.
Interclass hockey games will
begin Thursday, November 6, ac-
cording to the decision made at the
last meeting of the Executive Board
of the Women's Athletic associa-
tion. The tournament will be com-
posed of the four class teams and
a team made up of the freshman
physical education majors.
The hockey banquet, which is
the annual event marking the end
of the hockey season, will take
place November 20. The last game
of the tournament will - be played
on November 18. Elizabeth Whit-
ney, '31 Ed., manager of hockey,
will be in charge of the banquet.
This is the first year that a fresh-
man major team has joined the
interclass tournament. In former
years, each class was represented
by only one team.

tee will be in charge of the classes.
They will be aided by the members
of their committee. Winifred Root,
the third chairman of the commit-
tee, will be responsible for the gen-
eral organization of the classes.
Women who do not have classes
until 4 o'clock are requested to at-
tend the early 'class, as there are
many who will not be able to do
so.
GOLF FINALS ARRANGED

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UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS -The
only football game for which men
students may make dates is that
on homecoming day.

WVE DELIVER
PHONE 7850--9189
Specializing in
FOUNTAIN SERVICE
TOASTED SANDWICHES
TOILET REQUISITES
PRESCRIPTIONS
Ann Street DrugCo.
1117 East Ann Street
1?2 Blocks West of University Hospital

Few students in the University Those women who aualified in
appreciate or even realize the fa-
cilities there are here for gaining the first round of the golf tourna-
a knowledge of international af- ment may play the final round at
fairs and their relation to religion. 3 o'clock on either VWednesday or
Miss Ellen Gammack, student ad- Thursday, November 5 and 6, at the
visor at Harris Hall, urges that new University golf course. Each
people try to understand the signi- woman of this group is to notify
ficance that religion has ing ouMiss Ruth Hassinger, instructor of
aife today. physical education, as soon as pos-
She states that students who are sible of the day on which she will
earnestly seeking an education and play.
who are really desirous of grasp- --
ing opportunities for broadening
their intellectual life are failing
miserably if they ignore the exist-
ence of religion. She wants stu-
dents to see that Religion is not
something apart from nation wide
affairs or current events. It is a
subject that is vitally connected
with every problem that could pos-
sibly present itself in connection
with human relations, and a per-
son cannot be well educated unless
he does have a thorough knowledge
of this subject as well as those on
his schedule in the University.
Miss Gammack is advising and
helping an organization of students
who are primarily interested in re-
ligion just as they might be in any
other important issue of the day.
They view it as a problem to be
studied from every angle and con- 1
sidered under various circumstan-
ces.
In foreign conferences which
Miss Gammack has attended the
aim has been for the development
of the student's religious attitude
by intellectual means. She says
that few people know that there
is today 'a World's Student Asso-'lo
ciation, probably the only World
Organization that kept on func- ad
tioning during the war. jLdo
Miss Gammack's wish is not to
advocatencertain definite ideas, or
insist on denominational prefer-oU
ences.

...

- - ---- ---=--------=--==------- r z t -__

. ..
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R STOCK IS MUCH TOO LARGE-IT MUST BE REDUCED AT ONCE

you youngsters
must be
clairvoyant!

i !i i III
if~ fil I
I p UrIf1
lI Y~i t I! mvll f I II1 x

Sale Prices
(FOR 15 DAYS ONLY)
ON
Men's
Sh- s.

SalePices
(FOR 15 DAYS ONLY)
ON

i{'
N
ilk
u
IN
i
i
i

I

Ladaes
ShoesM
Prs. of Fine $10.00 Pumps or Oxfords.....$7.90
Prs. of New $8.50 and $9.00 Pumps and
Oxfords .......$..... 7.45
Prs. of $8.00 Pumps and Oxfords, now .... $6.45
Prs. of $7.50 Pumps and Oxfords, now . ...$5.90

We don't know sometimes how the news spreads,-
but just as soon as some particularly smart Junior
foundation arrives in our corset department, you seem
to hear about it. Then it seems to us that every mem-
ber of the younger set comes in, wanting just that
particular foundation. And we have to keep our
recorder pads handy.
ij Here now is the grandest little girdle you've seen for I
a long time. Just light peach batiste and elastic.
It's pretty cute and it's going to be terribly popular.
So don't say we didn't tell you in plenty of time.
And-whist-it's only $3.00
Nemo-flex No. 302

100 Prs. New $10.00 Shoes, cut to ............. $8.45
3 Lots of $10.00 Shoes, cut to ................ $7.90
150 Prs. New Fall $9.00 Shoes ...... $7.45 and $7.90
7 Lots New Fall $8.50 Shoes ........$6.90 and $7.45
100 Prs. $6.00, $7.00 and $8.00 Shoes $4.90 and $5.90
These shoes are in the newest leathers in black, tan or brown, smooth calf
or Scotch Grain
Gym Shoes and House Slippers all reduced

SPECIAL! SPECIAL! SPECIAL!
200 Pairs of $6.00, $7.00 and $8.00 PUMPS and OXFORDS, up-to-
date-styles, sizes somewhat broken to be closed out at
Don't Miss This Chance. We Can Fit You

125
200
150
100,

s:m mavreie irt - -- '9110

Women's GALOSHES-$2.50, now $1.95; $3.00 now $2.45; $3.50 now $2.95; $1.25
These Prices Offered for a Short Time Only, So Get to This Sale Early-No

Light Rubbers,
Charges.

98c.

or

11

an

V

oMa

III ® ® - - - - - - ' L - - - - - - " - I

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