100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 24, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'P IbAY. O GTOBEP. 24. 1920

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Ti'TL.TlV rr nrYw.#44> n HE MIC IG N D IL

..

Former Police Head
SOUTH SEA STUDiES Aid Unemployed
Of PINCHOT VUYACE

STATISTICS SHOW INCREASE IN WORK
DONE BY DEPARTMENT OF RESEARCH

Motion Pictures Reveal 'Travels
of Yacht from New York
to Pacific Islands.
EXPLAIN FAUNAS' ORIGIN
'Mary Pinchot' Visits Galapagos,
Balboa, and Other Islands
in Scientific Search.
Gifford Pinchot's yachting expe-
dition to the south seas, a voyage
that was made for scientific investi-
gation as well as for pleasure, was
described yesterday in a lecture by
Dr. Henry A. Pilsbry, curator of
mollusks in the Academy of Natural
Sciences of Philadelphia, who ac-
companied the expedition as na-
turalist.
Outlines Journey.
Dr. Pilsbry outlined, with the aid
of motion pictures and lantern
slides, the travels of the former
Pennsylvania governor's y a c h t,
Mary Pinchot, from New York down
through the Panama canal and
around the Pacific to groups of less
known islands that offered the in-
vestigators a wide and interesting
ground for faunal studies.
The expedition, after stops at.Old
Providence island, once held by buc-
caneers, and at Panama, proceeded
out through the Pacific ocean to the
Galapagos islands, Dr. Pilsbry ex-
plained.
Specimens Collected.
A great deal of data was collected
on the Galapagos group of islands,
Dr. Pilsbry said. Among the speci-
mens observed were penguins, cor-
morants, and the albatross. Both
marine and land Iguanas were
found. Several giant tortoises were
collected.
The Galapagos islands have many
rare animals, Dr. Pilsbry pointed
out. On each island are found
varying species of a genera which
may appear throughout the group.
This new world of animals aided'
Da.rwin, who visited the islands in
1835, in formulating his theory of
evolution, Dr. Pilsbry said.
The two scientific opinions on the
origin of the fauna there were ex-
plained by Dr. Pilsbry, who also
showed the criticism to which each
theory is open.

Clients Ask 66 Percent More
Work During Year Despite
Business Conditions.
Since the foundation of the de-
partment of engineering research
in 1921, the department has shown
steady growth until today it em-
ploys 313 persons, expending $323,-
441.53 annually, and makes service
charges of $309,921.62 for work done
for clients, according to a recent
compilation.
During the last year the total
work done for clients was 66 per
cent more than the previous year
in spite of unsettled business condi-
tions.
The research department has also
played an important part in fur-
WVhat's
Going
On
Theaters.,
Lydia Mendelssohn - "Olympia,"
Comedy club presentation.
Majestic -"Song of the Flame"
with Bernice Claire and Alexander
Gray.
Michigan - "Office Wife" with
Dorothy MacKaill and Lewis Stone.
Wuerth - "Rough Romance" With
George O'Brien; "Around the Cor-
ner" with Charlie Murray and
George Sidney.
Activities.
Rho Chi society -Business meet-
ing at 5 o'clock tonight in room 303,
Chemistry building.
Angell hall laboratory - Visitors'
.night; telescopic observation of the
moon from 7 to 10 o'clock tonight.

thering the standing of the engi-
neering college, in contributing to
faculty salaries, publications, the
library, and in assisting gifted stu-
dents to remain in college.
Prof. A. E. White, director of the
department, points out in his re-
port for 1929-1930 that 170 persons
registered as University students
were employed and paid $135,495.38,
an average of $790.87. In this num-
ber were 58 graduate students.
It was also mad, possible by the
department to add Prof. E. S. Petty-
john to the faculty to teach gas en-
gineering. $56,544.36 was added to
the compensation of 50 members of
the faculty during the period. More
than $200 was expended from its
current account for library books,
while $4,584.82 was expended for the
various research activities.
Research equipment was pur-
chased which amounted to $32,-
573.51, practically all of which may
be expected to become the Univer-
sity's permanent property. Other de-
partments of the University were
furnished with $5,466.78 for research
purposes during the year, and
$5,386.02 was used in publishing en-
gineering research bulletins, circu-
lars and reprints.
Dean Kraus Attends
Meeting at Madison
Dean Edward H. Kraus of the
pharmacy college is attending a
meeting of summer session admin-
istrators at Madison, Wis., this week.
He will return to Ann Arbor Sunday.

Associated Press Photo '
Arthur Woods
Former New York police commis-
sioner, who was recently asked by
President Hoover to take charge of
an organization being created to
relieve unemployment.
ART DEPARTMENT
SPONSORSEXHIBIT
Viennese Reproduction of Rare
Works Put on Display.
Viennese reproductions of the or-
iginal works hung in the Metropol-
itan Museum of Art in New York
are being exhibited this month in
room A of Alumni Memorial hall
here. These reproductions are the
latest acquisitions of the fine arts
department of the University and
comprise a collection of eight ser-
ies.
The series being shown are from
the Italian, American, Dutch and
Flemish schools, and also include
reproductions of famous tapestries,
near eastern textiles, near eastern
ceramics, Egyptian faiences, and
near eastern miniatures.
BEFORE
AND AFTER THE
GAME HAVE
LUNCH
at
RWE KETE'S
SUGAR BOWL
109 South Main

MONROE LUNCH
Corner Monroe and Oakland
Your Neighborhood Restaurant

I

Dinner 40c

and 50c

i

Complete Line of Everything Musical

( ;A'

THE MATCHLESS BALDWIN LINE Ott PIANOS
VICTOR, MAJESTIC, BRUNSWICK A \ADIOS
UNEXCELLED MARTIN BAND INSTRUMENTS

Terms to Suit

I r

s



*1

UNIVERSITY
MUSIC HOUSE
William Wade Hinshaw
Devoted to Music
Cor. Maynard & William
Phone 7515

NEWSBOYS
WANTED
to sell Michigan Daily
Extras-Call 21214.

IQ

,.^v
i
..: '
_
" _, ,,.

i

[AN DC tSSt/ro4 Yc
r DLYMPIC HEROES EULOGIZE IN VERSE

Yep

Michm
g

IN ANCIENT GREECE it took days,
weeks, even months to broadcast
news of the Olympic Games. Heroes
of those games were eulogized in
verse which often did not appear
until long after the events had taken,
place. Many times the victor re-
turned home with no advance tid-
ings to herald his coming.
THE NEtWs of sporting events today
is flashed over the wires the moment

Michigan has a good Foot Ball

eam and

Ton

Corbett has good clothes, styled for the C'olege
trade.
You can enjoy the game and parties in Corbett's ,
clothes because you know that they are ihe last
word for style and tailoring, popular priced and
special made trousers.
2 Pants
You surely will want one of our Overcoats, bcaut
ful fleeces, 50 inches long.

J

the contests are concluded.

The

,

Associated Press has a trained staff

covering
world.
read

sporting events of the
For the latest sports news

If

a .d ,aa

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan