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October 24, 1930 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-24

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F'.on TWO

T14MICHIGAN bATLY

PAGF~ TWO T1-T1~. MTCI-!TGAN bATLY

__ --

CHICAGO GRIDIRON MENTOR, HURT IN SCRIMMAGE,
RESORTS TO ELECTRIC CAR kR DIRECTING PRACTICE
D. Sawyer to Lecture at Firs
E .Colloqum on Tuesday,
T _ 7 t }.". A - tt':S. ..,, ;.1 .: . ... '. . : ....... , .z:i . ... ... 'x.... .Qtober 2 .

i;_E:a ~ a~I

I-

Or. Robbins Announces Choice
of Noted Faculty Man to
Give Initial Series.
WILL DISCUSS ANCIENTS
Late T. S. Jerome Wills Fund to I
University for Historical
Lectures, Research.
Announcement of a series of six
lectures, to be given under thec
Thomas Spencer Jerome fund forI
1930, was made by Dr. Frank Rob-f
bins, assistant to the .:President,
yesterday afternoon.
The first of the series will be Nov.'
4 and the final lecture is sched-
uled for Dec. 9. All lectures will
begin at 4:15 o'clock and will be
given by Prof. John Garrett Win-
ter, Ph. D., of the Latin depart-;
ment, and director of the division
of fine arts at thesUniversity.
Establishes Fund.
Thomas Spencer Jerome, Ph. B.,
L. L. B. 1885, M. A., 1887, died at
Capri, Italy on April 12, 1914. For
a considerable period of time Mr.
Jerome had served as consular a-
gent of the United States at Sor-
rento and later at Capri. He was
an enthusiastic student of antiqu-
ity and particularly of Roman his-
tory, and by his will directed thatj
the residue of his estate should be!
applied to the establishment and
endowment of a lectureship in the,
American academy at Rome and
at the University of Michigan for
the purpose of promoting historical
ftudIes along certain lines set forth
therei.
The lectures will, in general,
treat the various aspects of the
history of ancient peoples and the
rise and fall of civilizations. It is
provided bythewill that the lec-
furer shall be appointed by joint
action of the American academy in
Rome and the University of Michi-
gan through a representative com-
mittee, from among the most em- {
inent scholars who have devoted
their attention to the subjects in
cftestion.

HARDY TO SPEAK NOV. 4
Prof. D. M. Dennison, of the phy-
sics department, made public yes-
terday, a list of speakers who will
in the near future, talk before the
physics colloquiums which are held
at 4:15 o'clock every Tuesday after-
noon in room 1041, East Physics
building.
On Oct. 28, Dr. R. A. Sawyer, of
the Michigan faculty, will speak on
the physical characteristics of al-
ternate current therapeutic carbon
arcs. This will be a report on re-
search that Dr. Sawyer has conduc-
ted here.
Dr. J. D. Hardy, national research
fellow from Johns Hopkins univer-
sity, who is conducting research in
infra-red spectroscopy work here,
will talk on the amplifiers for in-
fra-red spectrometers on Nov. 2.
He will base his discussion on his
own personal findings.
On Nov." 11, Dr. Charles Myer of
the department here , will give a
report on thendefraction of elec-
trons and on Nov. 18, Dr. W. S.
Huxford of the engineering re-
search department, will speak on
the photo-electric effect on oxide
coated filaments.

Coach Alonzo Stagg, 68-year-old Univer ity of Ch i1e :; d mentor, attempting to scrimmage with his
team and was so badly mussed up that Le said, ' e. ga'r." Now he directs practice of -the team from
,n electric buggy. Mrs. Stagg is the chauffeur.

COOLEY'S VISION M.
PIONEER IN FIEL

Prof.

Pawlowski Taught Course
Here for First Time
in 1913.

Dean Emeritus Mortimer E. Coo-
ley of the engineering college may
have been called "foolish" back in
1913 for bringing Prof. Felix Paw-
lowski to the University to teach
aeronautics, but today he is prais-
ed for his far-sightedness which
has marked the engineering col-
lege as a pioneer in the field of
aeronautics.
Actually, however, the history of
aeronautics at Michigan antedates
the arrival of Professor Pawlowski,
for in 1910 H. C. Sadler, then a pro-
fessor, after attending the first air
meet in Boston, organized the Uni-
versity of Michigan Aero club. It
was a short time later that Dean
Cooley invited Professor Pawlowski
Woman Gives Mansion
for P r sar

AKES MFCHIG CAN State Lumbermen,
D OF AERO ┬░AUTICS Foresters to Open
to come to Ann Arbor at the sug- Conference Today
gestion of Professor Sadler. The
society formed by Dean Sadler is Lumbermen and foresters from
the forerunner of the present Aer- I all parts of the state will meet to-
onautical society. day and tomorrow at the forestry
Professor Sadler's interest in school in an informal round table
aviation had come from two sour~ discussion of the forest taxation
ces. His great grand unsle, James p
Sadler, was the first English aeron- ;problem. 'These conferences have
aut and had made a balloon ascen- been held annually since the for-
sion as early as 1784, and Professor mation of the School of Forestry
Sadler while teaching at the Uni- and Conservation as a separate

1~ :f

Because the private secretary comes so
close to her employer-she has set a
new standard among men. The young
business woman who may not be emo-
tionally involved with the man to
whom she gives her working hours-
finds nevertheless that her personal
life is colored and complicated by her
association with this man. See and
hear the picture that has started a
dwwsandcontroversies?.

's

A}.

versity of Glasgow had witnessedj
the glider flights of Pilcher.
Since these early beginnings the
aeronautical department of the
University has grown until today
the enrollment is nearly 250. Alum-
ni are leaders in various aircraft
corporations, professors in aeron-
autical schools, and leaders in the
field of aeronautics throughout the
country.

unit.
Tomorrow afternoon the timber
men together with members of the'
forestry school faculty and students
will attend a luncheon at the Un-
ion. They will be addressed by Shir-
ley W. Smith, vice president of the
University. They are then expect-
ed to watch the Michigan-Illinois
football game.

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DOROTHY mACKAILL
L EWIS STONE

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Winter Selected.
Professor Winter was chosen to IRv Associated Pross
deliver the first series of lectures NEW YORK, Oct. 23.-The New
at the University, all of whichi will york American says Mrs. Grace I.
be given in room D, Alumni Mem- Conners, widow of William J. Con-
orial hall. The topics which will ners, Sr., Buffalo newspaper pub-
be discussed in the six lectures are fisher, financier and political lead-
"Rome and the Romans in the Pa- er, has offered to turn her million
yri ;" "The Life of the People in dollar Long Island mansion into
Town and Country," parts one and one of the most complete cancer
two; "Evidences of Christianity in research institutes in the world.
the Private Letters;" "Recent Ad-- She made the offer to Drs. Walter
ditions to Greek Poetry," and "Re- B. Coffey and John Humber, of San
cent Additions to Greek Prose." Francisco, who have made some
notable discoveries in cancer re-
ZOOLOGIST TALKS search. She also informed them
fundswould be raised to endow the
ON,?% SECT PESTS institute and its work.
D. Graham Discusses Damage
to Forest in Radio Speech.
Touching on the life of some of1
A _4 - _4.- 4-_a i

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DRUG STORE
340 South State Street

our most detrimental tree insects
and their con'trol, Dr. S. A. Graham,
of the economic zoology depart-
ment, spoke yesterday afternoon on
the University radio program from
the WJR studio here.
"Injurious insects are actively en-
gaged .in devastating our forest
lands in the lake states at the pres-
ent time," he said. "The spruce bud-
worm, if we are to measure its im-
portance by the damage it has
caused must be regarded as the
most destructive insect in the entire
country."
"This insect has in the past 25
years destroyed timber amounting
to over 2Q0,000,000 cords, a volume
too great for the human mind to
comprehend, and still the damage
continues to grow each year," he
said.
In discussing the control of tree
insects Professor Graham mention-
ed that the use of natural enemies,
opens up a wide field of possibility.
"The difficulty," he said, "is to.
get these enemies when we want
them and distribute them where
they are most needed.

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