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October 11, 1930 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-11

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN

r)ILY

OClTOBER? 12.1930Y~

4:A i 1 V V A V A.:. 1 L ,i. A f 1 Ji{)1 /

Alumni
CDUNCLToLEET
W:11T9,EXEC UTIVES
AlaFACUT T E
Eaci Gr p With 100 Members
to Elect One Delegate
to National Body.
WILL DETERMINE POLICY
Local Council Will be Similar
to Those at Dartmouth,
Amherst and Harvard.
a inerous letters are being re-
ceived this week by President Alex-
ander G. Ruthven in regard to his
recent request that presidents of
University of Michigan clubs and
.4lnnae groups all over the coun-
tiy nominate representatives to
serve on the Alumni Advisory
council.
Apportionment Mad.
Each club or group is entitled to
one member, and those having an
eprolment of mnore than 100 r-
ceive extra representatives at the
rae of one for every additional 200
drnhmers, according to the plans
announced by President Ruthven.
The council, which is being
pltnned with the dual objective of
eriabling college administrators to
b nefit from alumni experience and
of keeping graduates in closer con-
tact with the intellectual and
scientific interests of the Univer-
sity, will meet in the future with
University executives and faculty to
aid in the determination of educa-
tional policy.
"Special fitness fo the position
and deep interest in certain aspects
of the University's educational task
rather than active club member-
hipjs desired in council members,"
stated President Ruthven. "It is
felt that some alumni eligible for
such a highly honorary position as
is. contemplated in this project
feel that they have served their
apprenticeship in the work of
alunpi organization, it is therefore
urged that all nominations be made
Qt a basis of standing, experience
and interests and position in the
community of those nominated."
Shiaw Praises Project.
In speaking of the value of such
4 ,council, Wilfred B. Shaw, direc-
toj of alumni relations, says that
e:4peration between business and
gpfessiQnal men and the staff o'
the University is expected to open
up fields of mutual utility. "Sugges-
tins from alumni may open up
new fields of research or more satis-
actory arrangement of courses,"
he sai. "A typical example is the
possibility of the development of
combined course in engineering
and business administration, which
some alumni feel from experience
would be desirable. Alumni advis-
ors meeting with factuly 'members
of the interested school or college
wil~ be in a position to exchange
yews and discover the educational
feasibility of such a project."
Recognition of the advisory worth
of interested alumni in college
afairs is not unique with the Uni-
versity, as somewhat similar or-
gnizations are in effect at Am-
herst, Dartmouth, and Harvard, but
flhe projected council marks the
first attempt of a large state Uni-
versity to build up a permanent,
closely knit organization for grad-
uate participation in college policy.
Results of Postal

Survey Foreshadow'
Revival in Business
((1 Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 10. - The
United States postal system in its
role of business barometer, is now
beginning to show the revival
prophesied a month ago by Assist-
ant Postmaster General Arch Cole-
man
On the theory that postal history
over a period of 60 years had shown
the volume of third and fourth
class mail rising and falling in di-
rect ratio to the general briskness
of business, Coleman anticipated
postal return toward normal by
feeling the business pulse.
He checked with mailers in other
cities with regard to when they in-
tended to resume distribution. As
a result of that survey;he announc-
ed August had seen the worst of
the slump.

Clubs

Noillu.na-te

espreseta tives

to General

REVOLUTIONARY FORCES FROM
IMPERILS BRAZILIAN CITY OF

NORTH ZO
BAHIA 3 E
A ! r m a n ' F L ?i d c e

OLOGY MUSEUM RECEIVES ARMY
OF PRIZED RATS FROM CALIFORNIA

Council
Those Qualified to Fill Speaking
Engagements Are Much
in Demand.

Gets Eight Containers of'
Pedigreed Rodents.

Dr. Dice's studies. For 10 years Dr.
Dice has been carrying on breeding
studies of deer mice, and has main-
tained a stock often reaching sev-
eral thousand individuals, kept in
more than 1,000 breeding cages.
1The additions of this series of new

:. K:~: 'Federal Troops Prepare Attack
on State Capital Throurh;
,...Opening of Roads.
(f s i
RIO DE JANEIRO, Oct. 10.-The
government today claimed succes-
, e N ses in two insurgent states in its
campaign to put down the revolu-
tion.
Several towns in southern Santa
f-3ICatharina which have been occu-
IX Ix : pied by rebels under Trifmno Cor-
Sr.a have been recaptured by fed-
: ' " J : _,eral troops acting out of Florian-
I cpolis and Joinville.
In Minas Geraes, federal troops
have re-established the railroad
line as far as Juiz Ra, and were
said to be preparing for an attack
on Barbacena so as to permit re-
opening of the line up to Bello
Horizonte, state capital.
There was possibility that the
federals would go around Barba-
cena and make a rapid march on
the capital of the state, which was
Associated Press Photo said Thursday to have been demor-
Revolutionary forces from the north wnich are reported to have alized and ready to surrender after
captured the government of the Brazilian state of Alagoas, south of raids by airplanes with bombs.
Pernambuco, were said to be marching on Bahia. A street scene in Sao Paulo troops also have been
Bahia, which has an American owned strect railway system, is shown active in southern Minas Geraes
above. and were reported today to be near
Ithe important junction point of
Pouso Alegre, where the rebel lead-
ProfCssor Duff eidack Returns Fr m Eur.pe; er, Waldemar Paschoal, was said
to have been killed in an attack.
Mk *eu r Phnom]ena S eci His Stidies Aviation forces of both the federal
government and the state of Sao
Comments on Duelling in Ger- as those in America are, according Paulo, it is claimed, have been
man College Fraternities. to Professor Duffendack, but in active and are performing work of
__eg r . certain specific fields they , have 'utmost importance in assisting
very excellent equipment. progress of federal ground men.
Prof. O. S. 'Duffendack, of the a--.SoPuorprssi htGn
physics department, has just re- There are many similarities inSaiPulo reposa. thtroops
phsisthe epsueod wit general type of student life," Numcn aCsa ihtop
turned from Europe after having he said. "The students are organ- at Florianopolis and Joinville, was
spent his sabbatical year in stud e i tetes r preparing to march on Curityba,
spen hissabaticl'yar mstuy; ized into frate rnitiles very similarcpia fPrnbtwsdayg
at the institute of Prof. J. Franck, to our college fraternities, but the capital ofexectationofan was delaying
receatonsandspot i qute if-wit execttio ofananswer to a
Noble prize winner in physics, at fereations and sport is quite dif- proclamation addressed to troops
the University of Goettingen..m of the Parana.
Pfof athletic sports requiring team A
Professor Duffendack was ap- organization. The students indulge A statement by President Wash-
Luispubishd tdayde-
pointed on a fellowship of the John more greatly in individual sports.-Lared that the revolution was not
S i m o n Guggenheim Memorial j The only organized sport among justified since it offered no new
foundation for the purpose of mak- t h e students is interfraternity principles to the people. He claimed
ing an investigation of the mole- dueling which seems to be indulged the movement was backed by
cular impact phenomena of gases in very extensively in spite of leg- politicians who had been defeated
in relation to the excited states of islation against it throughout Ger- in the last national elections.

Domestic mice may be feared,
but imported ones are to be prized.
At least, that is the opinion of
Dr. Lee R. Dice, curator of mam-
mals in the museum of zoology, who
recently received an army of more

and fully pedigreed stock gives the
museum of zoology the most im- PLANS MADE FOR FORUM
portant collection of live deenr mir

than 600 pedigreed Percmyscus or
deer mice. in the country, and will greatly Foreign students numbering more
The mice were shipped here in assist in the complex problems Dr. than two hundred and fifty are
eight large, partitioned containers Dice has undertaken. The mice were enrolled in the university at pres-
by a professor in the Scripps Bi- presented to the museum in recog- ent according to a directory com-
ological institution at La Jolla, niton of the leading position r. piled recently by the Internation-
Calif., and he who claims that the . al committee of the Student Christ-
rodent is physically frail may well Dice's work and colection has at- ian association.
exhibit surprise when he discovers tained. Letters of welcome have been
that all but one mouse survived the sent to all students registered from
long journey, an astonishingly fine Higbie and Bull Forsee foreign countries, as well as many
record for so lowly a creature, Dr. ..Americanstudents;wh o h a-v q
Dice believes.1Widowless Buddings shown interest in the forums and
Included in the number of sne-
cies and subspecies represented are (It s3'" A,* ,,dr) meeting conducted by the Inter-
national committee in the past.
several rare and important forms RICHMOND, Va., Oct. 10.-Prof. Commnatommile in the
of estrn ort Amricn derCommunications will be sent in the
ofwestern North American deer i H. H. Higbie of the University of near future to foreign students to
Michigan electrical engineering de- find out their qualifications for flll-
partment told illumination engi- ing speaking engagements in var-
Comstock to Advocate neers at their annual convention ious schools and churches through-
out the state. For there is a con-
epeal of Prohiiion here that there was a possibility siderable demand for speakers that
that buildings eventually would can give talks or conduct programs
DETROIT, Oct. 10. - An outright have no windows. of an international character.
declaration for repeal of the eigh- He said 20 to 25 per cent of the Plans are now underway for .the
teenth amendment and restoration total light available at a window first student-faculty forum, to be
of state control of intoxicating liq- may be lost through accumulations held Sunday afternoon, October
ors was made Thursday night by 26 in the upper room at Lane hall,
William A. Comstock, Democratic ° dirt in a fou-month period, even stated Morton Frank '33, chair-

candidate for governor.
Recalling that the Republican
state platform ignored prohibition,
after leaders of that party had said
it is not an issue, Mr. Comstock de-
clared that the voters of the state
are entitled to know where each
candidate stands.

tn a comparatively clean location.
In areas subject to more than aver-
age air pollution, Prof. Higbie said;
the loss of light might run as high
as 50 per cent.
H. S. Bull, also of the Michigan
faculty, collaborated with Prof. Hig-
bie in presentation of the lecture.

man of the International commit-
tee.
Prof. W. C. Trow of the Psychol-
ogy department has been obtained
to make an address at the meeting
it was announced. There will also
be musical and dramatic enter-
tainment.

l
it
<
i
t
f
i
c
i

NOW
PLAYING LPLAYING
DOROTHY MACKAILL in
With
FRANK FAY and NOAH BEERY
ALL IN TECHNICOLOR

molecules. Although Professor Duf-I
fendack spent nine months in
study and research, he found some
time to travel in England, France,
Belgium, Holland, Switzerland, It-
aly, and Germany.
In general, the laboratories in
Germany are not as well equipped
Committee Completes
Probe of Communists
(Pv Associated Press)
LOS ANGELES, Oct. 10.-Its in-
vestigation into Communistic ac-
tivities in the southwestern United
States completed, the congression-
al committee headed by Chairman
Hamilton Fish, Jr., today prepared
to leave for Washington.
The committee's two-day hearing
here was closed Thursday with
pleas for federal aid in counteract-
ing Communist propaganda urg-
ing armed uprising in the United
States. Several witnesses from var-
ious southern California points
told of difficulties they attributed
to Communists and asked federal
assistance.
The committeemen did not re-
veal if it had decided upon recom-
mendations to congress.
Gomberg Returas Here
After Lecturing Trip
After delivering two lectures be-
fore local sections of the American
Chemical, society during w e e k,
Prof. Moses Gomberg, head of the
chemistry department, is back in
Ann Arbor.
Professor Gomberg delivered a
lecture in Rochester, Monday and
one in Buffalo, Tuesday.
STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
-Iowa has instituted a class in ra-
dio announcing which proposes to
teach how "not to be superior" and
how to "assume an attitude which
will strike the lowbrow." After
completing the course and receiv-
ing fan letters, the students will
have earned two hours of credit.

many."
I STAT E POLICEMEN
RAID BLIND PIGS
(hr Assoc;(11"d Press)
DETROIT, Oct. 10.-State police
again swept through the outlying
section of Wayne county Thursday
and Thursday night and left be-
hind them a trail of badly wrecked
saloons and roadhouses.
Thirty-six places in Wyandotte,
Ecorse, Redford and other com-
munities were visited and 37 men
were cited to appear before a jus-
tice. A small quantity of liquor was
found and the furnishings of the
raided places were broken up.
The raids were under the direc-
tion of Dick Elliott, deputy com-
missioner of public safety, and were
made by a squad under the leader-
ship of Capt. Alonzo Gillette.
The same officers have smashed
up Wayne county resorts several
times in the last four months.

Dean Effinger to Visit j
SpokaneAlumni Club
Dean John R. Effinger, of the
literary college, will be entertained
by the University of Michigan club
of Spokane, Friday, Oct. 17, when
he visits the club during his trip to
the meetiNg of the Association of
American universities which will be
,held in San Francisco.
UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS-Un-
der a new ruling effective this fall,
students here must have 20 hours
credit and 30 grade points to class-
ify as sophomores. This is an ad-
vance of ten in the number of
points required.
SUNDAY CHICKEN
75c--DINNERD--75c
MONROE LUNCH
Corner Monroe and Oakland

Also
METRO SOUND NEWS
PATHE AUDIO REVIEW
__TALKING COMEDY[
"WHEN THE WIND BLOWS"

EXTRA
"RATTLIN' BONES"
With BOB HOWLAND
anid LEO MEYERS

11 lk"

mill

-W "RITZ

0.

o Series.

I

MA J E TIC
Now Playing All This Week
' The Story of a
A passmonate goodbye. Hisi
promise to return, hers to
remain faithful. Then L
eaame his adly grapple a IVt
witht the terrible sea mion- o
ster, Moby Dick, which
left him maimed for life.
Was it cruel to claim her
iove? Or was it crueler
to wander the seas for r . .
years while she kept her
pledge to wait?
See this epic of daring
adventure and enduring
love

MONDAY
OCT. 13
8:15 P. M.

Auditorium

OTHER CONCERTS IN SERIES

Oct. 31 Clare Clairbert, Belgian
Coloratura
Nov. 7 Alexander Brailowsky,
Russian Pianist

Nov.24 Detroit Symphony Orchestra
Ossip Gabrilowitsch,
Conductor
Dec. 12 Jose Iturbi, Spanish Pianist
Jan. 12 Detroit Symphony Orchestra
Bernardino Molinari,
Guest Conductor

Nov.20

_ -
. i

LAST
TIMES
TODAY

i ° '

Continuous
Shows
1:30, 11:00

DOUBLE FEATUR E PROGRAM
BET TY HUGH LOWELL
COMPSON TREVOR SHERMAN
IN
6 6 n l !'oeer wn

,
i
I
f
_
I

Don Cossack Russian Male
Chorus
Serge Jaroff, Conductor
Consisting of 36 expatriated
officers from the Imperial
Army in a program of Rus.
sian Church music, folk songs
and soldier songs.

Jan. 27
Feb. 2
Feb. 10

Albert S'palding, American
Violinist
Paul Robeson,
Negro Baritone
Sergei Rachmaninoff, Pianist

Single Admission Tickets

* . . $1.009, $1.509, $2.009, $2.50
Q'm" f. Q d " sas[" s!A

ii.....

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