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October 11, 1930 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-11

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ESTABLISHED
1890

-die
AF 1
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EDITED AND PUBLISHED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSI

Tfig
[Y OF MICHIGAN

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MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

- - .. ...... . ........ ...... . ....... - - - - - -------- ----- ... . ......... . . . - -

VOL. XLI. No. 12.

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1930

PRICE FIVE CENTS

BOILER AK

TUA&

CLASH

NTH

WOLVERINES

TODAY

Boyd,

Connor

Land

Plane

in Scilly

Islands

INVADERS WILL TRY

FAIL TO ARRIVE
AT DESTINATION
150 MILES AWAY
Wire Intenticrn to Fly
To Croydon Field
Tomorrow
DAMAGE RUMORED
Engine Trouble, Break
in Gas Tank are I
Reported
(J- V Ass iarId JtPress)
CROYDON, England, Oct. 10-
More than 150 niiles off their
course, Captain J. Errol Boyd and
Lieut. Harry P. Connor safely
brought down the veteran trans-
Atlantic monoplane Columbia soon
after 5 p. m. (noon E. S. T. today)
in the Scilly Isles, ending- a flight
of a little more than ?A hours from
Newfoundland.
Hop Off Today
The airmen telegraphed to Lon-
don from Tresco, one of the island
group off Land's End, tip of south-
western England, that they hoped
to get away early tomorrow for
Croydon Airdrome, their destina-
tion.
Their message, sent to Charles A.
Levine, who flew the Atlantic with
Clarence Chamberlain in the Col-
'iminijn 1927? ,stated thaI,. the
monoplane was undamaged. They
landed on a beach in the little is-
land. Both were well.
Word of the Columbia's landing
reached officials at the airdrome
here from the coast guard station
on St. Mary's Island, close toTres-
co. This message said that motor
truble had forced the monoplane
down, less than 300 miles short of
its goal.
Telegraph Lines Opened
Another report, received at Pen-
zance, Cornwall, however, said that
a damaged gasoline tank had cut
short the flight.
The solitary telegraph lines to
London from Tresco from London
shut down at the regular hour this
evening, but was reopened later to
let a few messages through from
the aviators.
Among those at the field were
Charles A. Levine, the boxer, Dave
Shade, who came over from Paris
by airplane to greet the aviators,
and members of the American and
Canadian colonies in London.
Apparently their course took
them well to the south of the Free
State.
Information that the sturdy mon-
oplane's second crossing was at an
end was received with relief by a
small crowd that had gathered at
Croydon airdrome to welcome the
aviators after their dangerous
journey.
YOST GIVES TALK
AT PEPMEETING

CONDLIFFE TALKS BEFORE CHINESE
STUDENTS ON NATIONALIST HOLIDAY
Says Chinese Must Retain Old l

HOOVER'S HOARD
PRlOBES EFFECT

Heritage of Culture.
"Japan has taken what she found
useful from the nations of the
western world, but has retained
her old traditions founded on an
anciend heritage of culture, and
this policy is the great lesson that
China must learn from Japan her
eastern neighbor," stated Prof. J.
D. Condliffe, of the economics de-
partment, in an address last night
in Lane hall before a meeting of
the Chinese students' club, held to
celebrate the national "double ten"
holiday.
Professor Condliffe extolled the
teachings of Dr. Sun-Yat-Sen, who
when merely an unknown Chinese
doctor in London, returned to his
native country and almost single
handed aroused the whole popula-
tion in revolt against the oppres-
sive Manchu dynasty. Prior to the
address the entire audience arose
and bowed three times before the
photograph of Sun-Yat-Sen which
was placed on the platform.
After the address a play was
presented entitled, "The New
Dawn," written by Miss Nettie Soo
Hoo, Grad.
CHINESE BANDITS
June Harrison, Edith Nettleton, J
British Subjects Reported
Beheaded After Torture.
WERE MI$SIONARIES .

,JtzccaL at
Wolverine
Plans To S

Purdue,
Graduate,
See Game

TO MAKE REPORT
ON ENFORCEMENT
H &i
...:..:
.. .. .. ..

OF

PRHBTO

Today's football game will
bring to Ann Arbor one of Mich-
igan's former track stars, who,
since his graduation in 1904 has
not seen a Wolverine team in ac-
tion. He is Nelson (Ned) A. Kel-
log, at present director of ath-
letics at Purdue.
When a member of the track
team, Kellog made a name for
himself one night against the
supposedly unbeatable Schutt, a
miler from Cornell. On the Wa-
terman gymnasium track, which
has 14 laps to a mile, although
he was a two-miler, he ran the
mile in 4 minutes and 30 seconds,
beating Schutt and setting a rec-
ord for both indoor and outdoor
tracks. He was also a member of
the first four mile relay that
ever represented the Maize and
Blue at the Penn Relays, the
members of which came back
with gold watches, prizes given
for first place.
KENYON EXTOLLS
RUSSIAN ODRAMA
Russian Works Are Different
From Those of England
And of America.
THEATERS CHANGING.

Law Enforcement Commissioners
Propose System for Testing
Amendment's Efficiency.
ELEVEN TO FORM GROUP
Wets, Drys Cooperate to Finish
Report for President
at Early Date.
(/?v ,- oia , wi.',e , H
WASHINGTON, Oct. 10. - Pre-
pared to go to the bottom of the
prohibition question, President Hoo-
ver's law enforcement commission
today neared a formula for solving
this troublesome problem.
To Decide Enforceability.
The formula, still subjecttto fur-
ther discussion, provides that 10
men and one woman of the com-
mission first determine whether the
dry law is being enforced, and if it
is not, whether it can be perfected
to make it enforceable.
Should the commission reach the
conclusion that prohibition cannot
be enforced, the next step would be
a decision whether it shall recom-
mend for modification or repeal.
There is no unanimity among the
11 minds on all details of such a
program, particularly over the lat-
ter part of it, but as the commis-
sioners went home over the week-
end to study further these volumi-
now eports on prohibition there

George W. Wickersham,
Chairman of the law enforcement
committee, whose forces will as-
semble on Wednesday and are ex-
pected to report that they find the
prohibition law unenforceable.
PREISiDENT SAK
BEFORE GRADUATES
Ruthven Warns Against Lack
of Culture in Eagerness
for Specialization.
LAUDS CONTINUED WOR:K

1
i
J
a
:
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f
1
j
r
i1
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TO REPEAT VICTORY
OVER VARSITY TEAM
1 iy Joi; Russ-,1I,
Iaciig the Maize and lue of Michigain in their-irst hattle of the
lon g; i 111 road 1t> a second straight Conference chaminsship, Coach
Noble Kizer's boilermakers will invade the Stadium this afternoon at
2 oclock. Purdue, after the first undefeated season in the gridiron history
of the school, will enter the game today with the determination to do or
die, for in the outcome rest all their aspirations to football power.
Although weakened by the graduation of such stars as Harnleson,
Welch, and Sleight, Coach Kizer has
moulded together a team this year
which experts claim will sweep
through the Big Ten if they are
able to conquer the stubborn Wol-
verines. With such importance at-
tached to the game this afternoon,
it is certain that the Lafayette
eleven will use every trick in its
Revolutionary Leader Reports bag in an effort to repeat the 30-16
trouncing which they handed Mich-
Fail of Santa Catherina, igan last year.
City of Joinville. In that game the Varsity was
counted heavy favorites, and for
BATTALION IS CAPTURED three quarters more than held
their own against the onslaughts of
R L ,sociaed IPirds) the Boilermakers, only to lose when
PO RTO ALEGRE, Rio Grande do
Sul, Brazil, Oct. 10.-Brazilian fed- the battle turned into a rout in
eral andrebls tdayfougt athe last quarter. Purdue will enter
battle at Joinville, a Santa Cathar- the game today something of a
ina city, which is one of the two favorite, not so much because they
government holdings in south Bra- are considered stronger man for
.a.oman, but because they are the
zil. A clash resulted in two civil- champions.
ians and one rebel killed, 13 rebels In the one game which Coach
wounded and the surrender of part Kizer's squad has played this year
of the defending forces. they put up rather a ragged show-
A communique obtained by the ing against Baylor University last
correspondent of a Buenos Aires week. The score was 20-7, but re-
c ports of the game indicate that the
newspaper, Lanacion, gave a few + count should have been much clos-
details of the battle. The commun- er on actual playing comparison of
ique, sent from Curityba by Caldas ;the two teams. In this game the
Braga, revolutionary chieftan, who invading backfield showed power
which the smaller Baylor team
led the assault on Joinville, said could not stop. Coachb ,Eizer's first
the eighthsbattery of artillery and string backfield composed of Jack
a naval battalion and two officers White, Alex Yunevich, Lewis Pope,
and 190 men had surrendered be- and Jim Purvis formed a ball-car-
fore the rebel onslaught. rying combination which should
Despite the surrender of two cause plenty of worry in Confer-
units, Captain Tregildo and a force ence circles this year. Yunevich and
of Santa Catharine state police White were members of the "four
held out. A company of rebel sol- riveters" from last season, while
diers and a detachment of the 13th both Pope and Purvis bear reputa-
battalion of Sappers attacked the (Continued on Page 7)

(By Associated Press)
FOOCHOW, China, Oct. 10.-Outto I believe it a great experi
of the mountains of north Fukien to see a Russian play," said E
came the story today of the terrible Kenyon of the New York The
state of the two British women mis- Guild yesterday, speaking at
sionaries, Miss Eleanor June Har- Lydia Mendelssohn theatre
risen and Miss Edith Nettleton, ",Modern Russian Drama."
slain at the end of weeks of nego-
tiations with bandits for their ran- The Russian works, Ke
som. pointed out, are unlike thos
The two women, both advanced England and America in a nur
in years, and of long mission service of ways. Plays by Turgene or C
among the Chinese, were subjected key are not mecnanical; each
to keendphysical and mental tor- is not intended to carry the
ture, and finally, to quote those who and characterization forward,
attempted to free them, "clumsily often lines seem to get nowli
and brutally beheaded." These writers make you feel t
Before being thus put to death, emotions through the writing.
however, the women were treated Russian realism is different fc
with the utmost disrespect, neglect amentally, Kenyon observed.
and cruelty, Miss Harrison being realists use details to carry
forced some days before her own the story or impression, he
execution to witness the end of four but the American realist always
captives of the Chinese bandits. some theory of life that the de
Both emisaries said that during are made to support, while
three months of captivity in a com- Russian starts with life, not th
munist lair in the mountains of The Russian theatre is now
north Fukien, the two missionaries changing state, Kenyon asse:
were subjected to the most brutal, The masters of realism, impress
physical and mental treatment. ism, and the other movements
They were allowed neither exercise no longer experimenting in
nor privacy, narrators said and country, though the men who
were guarded night and day by four working in the theatre are tr
bandits who repeatedly told them a every method to get the ef
horrible doom was hanging over needed. But drama is being ii
their heads. a background for propaga
However, if the spirit of ex,
Coach and Sprinkler menting for best expression rca
Damaed Cthe West, our drama may p
amagedin Collision from it, he concluded.
Two public vehicles were dam- Representative Soug
aged in a collision at the intersec- 1
tion of Church and Prospect streets On Charge of Lrct
yesterday morning when an East- c I ss)
ern Michigan coach crashed into CHICAGO, Oct. 10.-Stanle:

ence
Amer
eatre
the
on
nyon
e of
mber
Che-
line
plot
and
here.
their
und-
All
out
said,
has
tails
they
Rory.
in a
rted.
sion-
are
that
are
ying
fects
made
nda.
peri-
ches
rofit
hfly

appeaedtl be signs that tis plan Addressing members of theGrad-
was gaining favor. uate school as a separate college
It has been contended by an ele- for the first time in the history of
ment of the commission in the three the University, President Alexander
days of meetings that prohibition is nive sident Alexade
quiry into law enforcement and is building last night on the value of
the problem to be reckoned upon deepening one's education beyond
before going further with the work. the four-year period of college life.
Want Early Report.
This group harsy woitdemand Dr. Ruthven stated that there
Thi grup as on ts emad 3was little danger of a graduate
that the wet and dry problem be wa itedne fagaut
tackled nowth a view to permit student's neglecting to obtain the
ing an early report to President primary objective of post-college
Hoover work-training in specialized lines
During the hours of discussion --but that it is sometimesteasy to
overiprceg th e orehadiusn' forget the second objective -- a
over procedure there ms beentno broadening of education in other
division of the commission what- brodennfedcto.i te
ever on the merits of prohibition
and little time has been spent in "While you will, in the Graduate
an actual discussion of the wisdom school, apply yourselves to obtain
or unwisdom of the dry law. training for a profession, I need

police rear guard, while other re-
volutionaries set out to capture the
officers of the eighth artillery bat-
tery, who did not surrender with
their men.
Whitney Disparages
influence of Bears
on Stock Exchange

Delaware Election
Inquiries Started
By Senator G. Nyej
(P1' Associaed PBress)
WILMINGTON, Del., Oct. 10.-
Investigation into recent primaryJ
elections in Delaware was begun to-
day by United States senators Ger-
ald P. Nye and Roscoe C. Patterson
with only a few of the 13 witness-
es subpoaened being heard during
the day.
Charles F. Curley, Wilmington
attorney, who managed the selec-
tion of delegates to the Democratic
state convention, said the cam-

only warn you in tnis connection,
Dr. Ruthven continued, "that you

PROBABLE LINE-UPS
Michigan Purdue
Cox ...........L.E...........Moss
Auer......... L.T..Van Bibber
Hozer.......L.G........Steers
Morrison ......C..........Miller
Cornwell.....R.G....Christman
Samuels......R.T.......Buttner
Draveling.....R.E......Bateman
Tessmer......Q.B........White
Heston ........L.H........... Pope
Simrall ....... R.H......... Purvis
Hudson........F.B...... Yunevich
Officials: J. H. Nichols, Oberlin,
Referee; H. G. Hedges, Dartmouth,
Umpire; Lee Daniels, Loyola, Field
Judge; Jay Wyatt, Missouri, Head
Linesman.
STORM HALTS AIR
RACE ATKINGMAN

Students Evince Spirit on
of Purdue Contest.

Eve

should care in selecting your life CIyC O sOcIt 1rEss>
work. It is unfortunate that man CHICAGO, Oct. 10.-Explainingsbo
is so constituted as to be much that the stock market has become
influenced by fashion and custom. too big for any single group of in-
There are shifting styles in pro- dividuals to control the price move-
fessional training as well as in ment, Richard Whitney, president1
clothes. Epidemics of "ologies" of the New York stock exchange,
often sweep ourmuniversities and said today the effects of bear raids
make us too highly specialized." in time of depression are likely to
be exaggerated.
M. M. A. C. SELECTS Addressing the Illinois chamber
of commerce, Mr. Whitney added,
Y E A R 'S OFFICERS however:
"I personally do not believe it is
Hotkins, Shu, Pirch Are Named proper for persons to sell stocks in
volume and in a manner calculat-
to Principal Positions. ed to depress prices artificially. The
exchange does not defend, or look
W. Harvard Hotkins, grad., was with favor upon selling of this
elected president of the Michigan character."
Municipal Administration Club, at
the organization's meeting 1a s t - Way
Thursday evening in Angell Hall. oE r er yne County
Other officers chosen at the meet- Prosecutor Dies Here
ing are Wilson S. Shu, grad., secre--__I_
tary, and Arnold J. Pirch, grad., James V. Willcox, former assistant
vice president. United States attorney in Detroit,
Professor Thomas H. Reed and and prosecuting attorney of Wash-
Lent B. Upson, both of the political tenaw county, died yesterday morn-
science department, were elected ing at his home, 1820 Hill street.
associate members. He was 77 years old. Mr. Wilcox
was a graduate of the law class of
Blackett Will Devote the University in 1875, and had been
a resident of Ann Arbor for 13
Vacation to Research years. He is survived by a brother,
George D. Wlcox, of Detroit; two
Professor Olin W. Blackett, of sisters, Mrs. John F. Lawrence and
the School of Business Administra- Miss Julia M. Willcox, of Ann Arbor,
tion is on sabbatical leave this year, and two nieces, Mrs. Vincent L.
and will not resume his duties as Price, of St. Louis, and Miss Marion
associate professor of business sta- N. Willcox, of Marshall. Funeral
tistics until next fall. services will be held from his late
Professor Blackett will spend his home at 4 o'clock Sunday after-
time in carrying on research work, noon.

paign for former United States
senator Thomas F. Bayard, the
y H.I Democratic candidate for senator

Declaring that the greatest test
of a man comes in defeat rather,
than victory, Fielding H. Yost,I
"Michigan's Grand Old Man of
Football" addressed several thous-
and enthusistic rooters last night
at the pep meeting in Hill auditor-
ium. The subject of Director Yost's
address was the "Spirit of Michi-
gan."
Bennie Oosterbaan, Michigan's
All-American athlete of a few
years ago and now Varsity coach,
also spoke. Kasper Halverson, '31,
and Merton J. Bell, '31, president of
the Student council were the other
speakers on the program.
Montgomery Shick, Varsity cheer-
leader and four of his assistants led
the assembly in several cheers. The
Varsity band played Michigan
nos nnderr the hledershin of Ar-

a city sprinkler truck at 9:50i Kunz, representative in Congiress ILt-----------------'
o'clock, from the eighth Illinois district, is had cost $33,936.
Tcoacnbeing sought by police, it was re- He submitted a list of contribu-
The coach, driven by D. Harring- vealed today, on a warrant charg- tors incl'uding Mrs. Elizabeth Du-
ton, was going south on Church Iing larceny by bailee of $850. Pont Bayard, wife of the candidate,
street, and the sprinkler, driven byI
who gave $11,500; John J. Raskob,
Jack Shanahan, was going north- Windt Announces Cast chairman of the Democratic na-
west on Prospect when the accident or Molnar's 'Olympia'. tional committee, $7,400; E.E. Du-
occurred. According to Harrington, fiona commi $ 0 .

Buck Gains on Ingalls Before
Forced Stop in Arizona.
(By Associated Press)
KINGMAN, Ariz, Oct. 10.-Laura
Ingalls, St. Louis aviatrix, and Rob-
ert Buck, junior East-West trans-
continental flightrecordiholder,
racing from Los Angeles airport to
New York, flew into Kingman today
and halted to wait out a storm
which swept the north Arizona air
lanes.
They will remain here overnight,
pending a change in weather condi-
tions. Their next scheduled stop is
Albuquerque, N. M.
The storm closed down in earnest
at noon, shortly afternoon the ar-
rival of Miss Ingalls and Buck, and
drove all aircraft to cover. Young
Buck gained 22 minutes on his fem-
inine competitor in his race from
the coast.
Britons Mourn Victims
of R-101 Catastrophe
(By Associated Press)
LONDON, Oct. 10--This was Great
Britain's day of deepest mourning
for the 48 men who died as a re-
sult of the disaster which wrecked
the dirigible, R-101, in France last
Sunday.

the damage to the sprinkler con-'
sisted of a bent front axle and
damaged frame, while the coachl
had both headlights smashed, and
a damaged bumper and radiator.
Educational Students
Select Class Officers

Members for the cast of "Olym- a ;I ren D±,uu o rti , $8,ui,0 and -
pia," by Molnar, which will be pre- 000; Irene DuPont, $8,000 and W.
sented by Comedy Club October 24, F. Raskob, $500.
25 and November 1, in the Lydia The association Against the Pro-
Mendelssohn theatre, were an- hibition Amendment, he said, had
nounced yesterday by Valentine B. no connection with the campaign
Windt, who will direct the play. committee and made no contribu-
The leading roles will be played tions to it. No other organization
by Eugene Chapel, '32, and Mary spent any money on Bayard's be-
Power, '32. Florence Tennant, Grad., half, said Curley.
will play Miss Power's role in the Gerald Montaigne, assistant state

gathering statistics and various
business data from the records and
files of many business concerns who

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