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February 28, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-02-28

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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1931

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

PAGE THR

THE MCHIGA DAIL

A V~ L' 1 aA.LV1r

s

Practic
CO ITIONS EXISI
SIMIAR TO THOSI
FOUND ICJINDUSTRI
Unit Under State Supervision
Courses Designed to Aid
Civil Engineers.
EMMONS DIVISION HEAt
Materials Used in Constructio:
of Highways Tested by
Department.
Opportunity for students of civi
engineering to obtain experience ir
practical testing work, as well a
to come into contact with materials
and conditions similar to those
found in industry, is offered by the
state highway department in thei
laboratories in the East Engineer-
ing building.
This unit is under supervision o
the state, being connected with the
University only through Prof. Walt-
er J. Emmons, of the engineering
school, and director of 'the state
highway laboratories and Edwin A
Boyd, laboratory supervisor.
Is University Division.
The division has been established
in conjunction with the University,
Professor Emmons said, because the
University is a public service, as
well as an education institution, be-
cause it greatly strengthens the
course in civil engineering by giving
the students access to valuable
practical experience, and because
it keeps professors in the course
alive' to modern changes. It is these
features which helps to make the
ccurs at Michigan, one of the best
in the country.
Many undergraduates work their
way through college - by helping
part time in the highway labora-
ties. Professor Emmons stated that
this outside work was very valuable
to engineers after graduation and
to inted to the case of a man who
gzaduated last year, after working
clmmers and part time with the
department who obtained a $2,400
a year job with one of the leading
cement companies.
Test Road Materials.
The road department tests all
ntaterials that are used in road
construction in the state. Cement
nmaterials constitute the majority
of, their work. The staff, when
running to capacity, includes 80
n'n.
In the winter, when the building
program is rather limited, a great
deal of research work is performed.
Two years ago they carried out an
extensive study of the effect of
soft stones, such as ochre and slate,
in the aggregate to be used for
concrete. They were able to prove
that the effect was injurious both
a' far as the strength of the work
was concerned and smoothness of
the surface.
At the present time the depart-
ment is studying the soil on which
sib-grades are built to find the
rmason why thawing and freezing
will cause the road to bulge.
"This can be preaicted," Profes-
sor Emmons said, "by a careful
survey of the roads under the
rocks. In general, the 'heaves' oc-
cur in soil consisting of clay or silt
which has access to water carrying
strata. With alternating freezing
and thawing a pumping action is
developed that causes ice layers,
formation of which will eventually
cause the road to bulge. Therefore

we are conducting a soil survey and
when the points of probable failure
are located, we will excavate and
Rudy Vallee to Play
for Michigan Program
A special University of Michigan
night will be held at the Michigan
theatre in Detroit, the evening of
March 11, during the personal ap-
pearance of Rudy Vallee. Vallee
will feature Varsity and other
Michigan songs during the perfor-
mance.

Experience

aaned -

in

Highway

Lab oratories

ANN ARBOR NEWS-BRIEFS

COURT SENTENCES Novel Purposes for Radio Seen
GANGSTER TOI GsI
~i G.W. Watson's New Invent ion

JURY EXONERATES Republicans of Couny
ALBION MOTORIST Rally in Court House

(1Y Associated Press)
DETROIT, Feb. 27. - Radio has
been given a new job, transmitting
messages to be recorded on distant

.z
1,
*1

receivmn es ya neto
Charles Baldwin Released After The Democratic party was termed redemonstsuccesnuiyee.
-hda"poor, old discouraged ,,arty, em- heosrtd ucsf y nere.
Verdict Is Reached. aittor,' old asuged §ryudem- Glenn W. Watson, the inventor,
of overwhelming defeats tey heT said the possibilities of his ma-
Inquest into the death last Sun- met" by H. Wirt Newkirk, Republi- chine, which he has named the1
day of Miss Anna Spatheli, 61, Ann can candidate for mayor of Ann *Watsongraph, were no more than
Arbor business woman, who was Arbor, at a Republican rally here touched upon in the demonstra-,
killed a, she was crossing the in- yesterday. ao n uehione
taNewkirk declared that the Re- It also can be used, he said, to
publicans, with its leader, Ierbert reproduce simultaneously in thea-
mouth road, revealed that the Hoover, will "sweep the country ters without number, words and ac-c
driver of the car could not be with another victory" in 1932. His ';Ytions of a theatrical performance'
charged with negligent homicide. address was the principal one mad presented in a properly equipped
Charles Baldwin, 23, Albion col- at the county convention held .in broadcast room.
lege student, driver of the car, was the court house.jX Among other uses suggested are
released following the hearing. He William Laird, Ann Arbor attor- transmission of mesages to ships1
was arrested by police immediately ney, presided. Prominent p a r t y at sea or airplane in the air; di-
following the accident. leaders from all over the county rection of police squads by code
The coroner's jury held that both attended the meeting. kmessages of which a record may be
Miss Spathelf and Baldwin were _Assoc6ated Press Photo kept and transmission of news
careless. Baldwin contended that a ge B dstories from the typewriters of re-t
he had been waiting for the signal Pass of Issue Alphonse Capone, porters to news rooms or directlyP
light to change, and did not see Seen as Aid to Labor Gangster who was sentenced to into homes.o
Miss Spathelf cross the street. six months imprisonment for con- The sending machine with whichd
More than 100 unemployed resi- tempt of court by Federal Judge the inventor demonstrated the pos-L
Fumes From Gas Stove dents would be given work if the 1Wilkerson sibility of these developments might
- -.-n a -yproposed $325,000 water bond issue. ---

be a typewriter with a revolving
disc attached. Watson typed out
messages on the keyboard. A re-
ceiving set in a distant room re-
corded them instantaneously.
The reciving set has a similar
disc and Watson explained the
secret lies in synchronization of
those discs. Eacai disc contains let-
ters of the alphabet as each key i
depressed, he explained. The im-
pulse of that letter is sent into the
air, to impinge on the same letter
or key of the receiving set. Static
cannot interfere, he said, nor car,
other machines create interferenec
when the synchronization is per-
fect.
M. Adeva to be Guest
at Filipino Reception
M. Adeva,, general secretary of
the Christian student movement in
America, will be the guest of hon-
or at a reception for Filipino stu-
dents to be held at 8:00 o'clock in
Lane hall. All students from the
Philippine Islands are invited.

LONG WOR TH G ET S
PLACE ON TICKE 1
House Republicans Renominate
Present Officials.
(BY Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Feb. 27.-In har-
monious mood the house Republi-
cans Thursday night decided to
support Speaker Longworth and the
present slate of officers for re-
election next session.
But away from the party caucus
stayed 15 members who refused to
commit themselves, by attending
on either candidates or policies.
Five of these were Kansas regu-
tars, incensed at the final refusal,
delivered Thursday by Chairman
Hawley of the ways and means
committee, to consider oil embargo
legislation at this session.
The rest were members of inde-
oendent tendencies with various

demands for legislation and fur-
ther recognition of their group.
United, this group can hold the
balance of power in the next house,
for the membership is almost equal-
ly divided between the parties.

ly divided between the parties.

F atal to Local Woman
Overcome by illuminating gas
from a stove in the kitchen of her
home, Mrs. Marie Schmid, 342 Mul-
holland avenue, was discovered
dead at 1 o'clock yesterday after-
noon by John Dolgey, a roomer.
According to police, who were
called to the Schmid home by Dol-
gey immediately after he discovered
the body, Mrs. Schmid had had a
pan of potatoes cooking on the
stove at the time of her death.
Officials have accepted the theory
that water from the potatoes boiledl
over into the stove, extinguishing
the fire. One burner was turned on
when Mrs. Schmid was discovered,
police said.
An inquest held by Justice Jay H.
Payne in the absence of acoroner
handed down a verdict indicating
that death was due to accidental
causes. It is believed that a heart
attack contributed to asphyxiation
as the cause of death. Burial will
be from Hildinger's Funeral home.
Lay Will Give Weekly
Lectures on Aircraft
Prof. W. E. Lay, of the engineer-
ing school, will give weekly lectures
on aircraft engines as part of the
course in naval aviation, it was an-
nounced yesterday.
The lectures will deal with the
fundamental principles of the gas
engine, materials of construction
and ignition, oiling, and carburiza-
tion systems.
Special emphasis will be placed
on the design of engines for air-
craft use and a comparison of the
air and water-cooled types of mo-
tors will be drawn.
Reserve officers who have com-
pleted their training at Pensacola
state that this course has been
helpful to them.
Two Addresses, Band
to Feature Broadcast
When radio fans tune in on the
Michigan Night program at 7:30
o'clock tonight they will hear two
faculty talks and the Varsity band
broadcasting from the campus stu-
dio.
Dr. James M. Winfield, of the
medical school, will discuss "Street
Accidents." Prof. Elmore S. Petty-
john, of the engineering college,
will speak on "Gas Progress." He
will tell of the various new uses of
gas in the home, shop, and factory.
The 100 piece Varsity band under
the direction of Nicholas Falcone
will present concert selections and
marches during the program.
CROSLEY AMRAD BOSCH
SHOP
WE SELL
WE SENT Radios
WE SERVICE
Tel. 2-2812 615 B. William

providing for the construction of as
new reservoir and the connecting
and installing of mains, is approv-
ed. Harrison H. Caswell, manager of
the water department, said yester-
day.
Reads Paper Based on Findings
of Educational Committee
Appointed by Hoover.
(Special to The la)
(hDETROIT, Feb. 27,-A summary
of the "Federal Government in
Education" was delivered today by
Dean James B. Edmonson, of the
School of Education, before the Na-
tional Association of Commercial
Teacher Training Institutions, in
the Masonic temple at Detroit. He
based his paper on publications of
the national advisory committee on
education which was created by
President Hoover in 1929.
"T h e committee, according to
President Hoover, was appointed to
investigate and present recommen-
dations," Dean Edmonson said.
The following major issues are
before the advisory committee, he
stated:
"Under our theory and practice
of popular sovereignty has the fed-
eral government an obligation to
aid education in the states?"
"Shall this aid be financial; to
what extent; by what methods?"
"Shall federal aid take the form
of general education grants to the
states for their own allocation or
the form of special grants for par-
ticular types of education?"
"Shall the states be compelled to
match federal grants, general or
special with local appropriations?"
"Shall these grants be so condi-
tioned that the federal government
may inspect, and ultimately con-
trol, both the social policy and the
professional procedure of public
schools in the 48 states?"
Dean Edmonson also stated some
of the tentative proposals that has
already been considered by the na-
tional advisory committee on edu-
cation.
"Let's walk"

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..-- ----

A ield For Advertising-

Find out first, Mr. Merchant, just what fields

you want to cover with

your advertising and then go

after it.

The students of the University

o Michigan offer you a field with unlimited possibilities

for increased

business.

If you are not getting your share from this field look around

Only one publication

To Cover It---

covers this

field thoroughly and that is The Michi-

gan Daily, read every morning by every student and faculty member.
Here is where you will get the greatest advertising value for the money

you stf)e11(1

It is left to you to make -

edAppeal---

"oh, well ..

."

-
THE Neolithic men were un-
questionably a smart people,
In the heart of the Umbrella
Age they figured out that
strolling in the rain would be
fun if you only didn't get wet.
Nothing more was done about
it, though, until 1836, when
Tower started making slick-
ers. We're good at it
now, if we do say it.
Fish Brand Slickers, roomy,
well-cut, long-wearing, are
sold everywhere, in a wide
range of models, weights and
colors, for men and others.
Your slicker will soon pay for
itself in reduced taxi and
pressing bills. Look for the
fish on the label. A. J. Tower
Company, 24 Simmons Street,

i
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t
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i
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I

As appeal that is suited to the student mind will bring results. It is
up to you to see that your ad has the correct appeal and if it has-
- 01
Yu'll Increase ourBusiness
PI

10

-I

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