100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 28, 1931 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-02-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1931

I _ _

Published eery morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
maste: General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by rnail, $4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard
Street. Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial BoarI
HENRY MERRY
FRANK E. CooPEr, City Editor
News Editor ..............Gurney Williams
Editorial Director ..........WaiterW. Wilds
Sports Editor .............Joseph A. Rtfcsell
Women's Editor ...........Mary L. Behyner
Music, Drama, Books.......Wm. J. Gorman
Assistant City Editor ......Iharold 0. Warren
Assistant News Editor......Charles R. Sprowl
Telegraph Editor ..........George A. Stauter
Copy Editor..................Wm. F. Pypet
NIGHT EDITORS

obnoxious acts is far beyond the
class of a whispering campaign or
a few wild howlings of a liberal
press. While there is no safety in
predicting the chances for repeal
ultimately, it is certain that forces
are not operative in the country
which must be reckoned with m
much more summary style than
the apostles of prohibition were
ever able to command.

S. Beach Conger
Carl S. Forsythe
David M. Nichol

John D. Reindel
Charles R. Sprowl
Richard L. Tobin
Harold 0. Warred

SPoRTs ASSISTAN TS
Sheldon C. Fullerton J. Cullen Kennedy
Robert Townsend
REPORTERS

. . Bush
Thomas M. Coolei
Morton Frank
Saul Friedberg
Frank B. Gilbret1
Veak Goldsmith
oland Goodman
Morton Helper
Sames Johnson
}ryan Jones
Denton C. Kune
Eileen Blunt
Nanette IDemnbitz
Elsie Feldman
Ruth Gallinge
Emily G. Grimes
can Levy
orotiv Maee
Susan Manchester

Powers Moulton
Wilbur .. Meyers
Brainard W. Nies
Robert L. Pierce
Richard Racine
Jerry E. Rosenthal
Charles A. Sanford
Karl Sciffert
George A. Stauter
loon W. Thomas
)oin S. Townsend
Mary McCall
Cile Miller
Margaret O'Brien
Eleanor Rairdon
Anne Margaret Tobin
Margaret Thompson
Claire Trussell

*1
Campus Opinion
Contributors are asked to be brief,
confining themsel es to less that. -300
words if possible. Anonymous comn-
munications will be disregarded. The
names of communicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should not be
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of The Daily.
ART AND THE 'ENSIAN
To the Editor:
It was with deep regret that
many of the class of '31 viewed
the 'Ensian cover this morning. For
my part, I am ashamed L, have my
picture bound in such a cover.
Even if it had been bound in an
old blue notebook with its M, I
wouldn't have been more astound-
ed. That, at least, has some back-
ground to remind me of college
days. I'm not familiar with Indian
picture writing, but such, if that is
what it is, certainly is out of place.
I would also like to know, having
remained sober while on the cam-
pus, what the cock-eyed, crazy-
angled pictures of the columns of
Angell hall and of the old arch
will remind me of forty years from
now. What will my friends think?
Certainly such pictures b e 1 o n g
along with the 'big fish' pictures in
the comic section. i
Our grass stained duck-covered
'Ensian would certainly have looked
fine 'for the January issue of the'
Gargoyle. Truly there are a num-
ber of square pegs trying to fill
round holes! "What excellent Gar- I
goyle material found positions on
the 'Ensian staff!" That is the
summary of a few minutes over-
heard conservation at the display
window.
Now to those who are always
suggesting laws to remedy every
situation, allow me to suggest 'there
ought to be a law' against the
seniors buying "a pig in a poke."
If such a radical change was to
be made in the policy of the cover
design, such a cover should have
been presented to the class for sug-
gestions. If there was as much op-
position to such a cover as there
is now, it could have been changed.
It may not yet be too late! I, for
one, will go on record as desiring
a dignified leather cover, one that
,I could put on display, put in a
, book case or leave onkthe table for
people to see, a book that would
impress good common sensed peo-
ple, but now . . . well, I'm just a
Ssucker who "bit" early.
Clare Huggett, '31, '34M

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
T. HOLLISTER MABLEY, Business Manager
KASPER 1. HALVERSON, Assistant Manager
DEPARTMENT MANAGER'S
Advertising ...............Charles T. Kline
Advertising ............Thomas M. Davis
Advertising ............WilliamXV. Warboys
Service. .............. Norris J. Johnson
Publication............Roert W. Williamson
Circulation ..............Marvin S. Kobacker
Accounts....................Thomas S. Muir
Business Secretary............Mary J. Kenan
Assistants
Harry R. Beglev Erle TKightlinger
Vernon Bishop Ion W. Lyon
William Brown William Morgan
Robert Callahan Richard Stratemeier
William W. Davis Keith Tyfer
Richard H. Hiller Noel D. Turner
Miles Hoisington Byron C. Vedder
Ann W. Verner Sylvia Miller
Marian Atran helen Olsen
HeTlen Bailey Mildred Postal
sephine Convisse Marjorie Rough
Maxine Fishgrund Mary E. Watts
Dorothy LeMire Johanna Wiese

Dorothy Laylin

OASTED R LL s
THIS IS (
CONTRIBUTORS I
EMPHASIS WEEK!
Baxter
This week in an effort to bringt
the true natural humor of the
Genus Campus to the fore in our
department, we are headlining con-~
tributions that drift our way, pro-
viding, of cotrse, that they are
more fit to print than what we
have to say which is practically in-
evitable you might say-I wouldn't
think of saying.
* *: *
CONTRIBUTORS FOR TODAY
Dear Dan:
Something should be done about
the new modernistic 'Ensian cover.
My suggestion is to furnish a bottle
of perfume with each book making
it smell like a pansy too. After all
it is symbolic of the institution if
things continue as they are at pres-
ent.
Last Year's Subscriber.
Dear Old Subsriber:
We modern are very fond of
pansies.
DAN BAXTER.
P. S.-You must come and see us
sometime.
o * *
Dear Uncle Daniel:
At last I have found a meritorius
use for coeds. This morning as I was
piffling my way toward a bright
future and a higher education, I
chanced to pause at a corner to
let an automobile pass. My trained
eye fell to the street and there I
espied a beligerent looking puddle
precariously near me. Beside me
stood a few of the inhuman species
with which this article is concern-
ed, their untrained minds all un-
aware of the approaching danger.
Summing up the possibilities of suc-
cessfully warning them and finding
them nil, I did the next best thing
by stepping gracefully behind them,
saving myself a lovely cleaning bill
through the agency of the mere
{nature of coeds exploited, of course,
by my own adroit mentality.
Yours in the Ponds,
Mal A. Forethought.
Dear Mal:
I Hmphph! Don't you realize
that that was discourteous and
rude? Shame on you! Every
coed might be your sister, and
as an indication to the deity
that you are duly thankful that
she isn't, you should comport
yourself with great respect and
thoughfulness towards e a c h
and every one of the dear little
pests and never take advantage
of their little mental lapses.
Uncle Daniel who is very angry.
* 4 ,
Dear Dan:
Look what came on the women's
pagetoday! . . . A lovely notice I
guess. It goes like this-
"Tryouts for positions on either
f the staffs f the Gargyle shuld re-
port tomorrow afternoon, further
details of the tryouts meeting on
Friday to appear in the Daily later

Ion in the week."
Lucid, No?
Yours,
WHOOSIL
Dear Whoosh:
Don't you pay any attention
to it. It's just those old funners
on the Gargoyle trying to fool
people again.
Yours,
Dann'l.
DAILY POEM
See the B & G boys whistling
As down the walks he takes his
stroll (pronounced strawl)
Sh! He may step in a puddle,
It's a fine world after all!
* * *
1 DON'T FORGET IT'S CONTR.
BUTOR'S EMPHASIS WEEK!
Mud! Seas of oozing slime-Lake.,
and oceans of sliming ooze, dirt3
puddles being traversed by equall3
dirty feet. Oh the squalor of it!
DON'T FORGET THE CONTRI-
BUTOR'S EMPHASIS WEEK!
Spring! The period of worms and
ruined spring hats. Robins, spar-
rows, ... ducks! . . . cigarette stubs
dirty gravel one on Angell Hall
steps, the other in insteps . ... Or

Mu[JsiC AND DRAMA
PIANO RECITAL SUNDAY AFTER-
NOON
Maud Okkelberg, Assistant Pro-
fessor of Piano in the School of
Music, will appear in a piano re-
cital tomorrow afternoon at the
Mendelssohn Theatre beginning at
4:15 o'clock in the Faculty series.
For the recital she has announced
the folowing splendid program:
Bach-Liszt: Prelude and Fugue
in A Minor; Mozart: Rondo; Schu-
mann: In the Night; Brahms: Va-
riations and Fugue on a Theme of
Handel; Liadow: Barcarolle; Tcher-
epnine: Chanson Tcheque; Ravel:
La Vallee des Cloches; Ravel: Jeux
d'Eau.j
THE DECLINE OF THE WEST
The current number of the Mod-
ern Quarterly, a critical journal
published in New York and edited
by V. F. Valverton, contains an
article on contemporary musical
trends entitled "The Western Dance
of Death" by Carl E. Gehring, whose
musical criticism is well known to
Ann Arbor.
From the fundamental position
that Music is "a spiritually-reveal-
ing or key-art' or again that music
is "a subtle index of the spiritual
condition of its spokesmen" Mr.
Gehring broadly examines the mu-
sic of the last half a century and
finds it essentially corroborating
the rather disastrous conclusions
and prophecies about Western cul-
ture made by Oswald Spengler in
his "Decline of the West."
Mr. Gehring finds only decadence
in the European music which is in
the grea.t German tradition and
suggests that the "foci of civiliza-
tion are shifting to other than
western centers, ,to those people
best fitted for the task of rejuvena-
tion"-namely Russian and United
States, countries whose potential
vitality has been presaged by their
music, the rythmic features and
"gaunt strength" of the one music
and the significance of the crystal-
lization into "Jazz" of the Ameri-
can-Negro contribution to the
other. All other contemporary
music is found to be an enfeebled
reflection of a "civilization-become-
unwieldy"- a situation which, it
is predicted, will soon work out its
consequences and "blot out to obli-
vion the West."
The fundamental assumption of
the article (that is, the nature of
the relation between music and so-
ciology which is postulated) and all
the musical judgements are inter-
estingly provocative and make a
highly stimulating discussion.
PLAY PRODUCTION PRESENTS

"STRIKING PERSONALITIES
MODERN GERMANY"
Mr. Harry N. Holmes
of New York.
(Wesleyan Guild Lecture)

0(

r rlr~fI.I ~~~> I
' -t .'

OFI

10:30 A. M.-Morning
"HUMANISM"
Dr. Fisher
7:30 P. M.-Evening

Worship.
Worship.

-
THE
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
E. Huron, below State
R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister of
Students.
9:45 A. M.-The Church School.
Mr. Wallace Watt, Superintendent.
10:45 A. M.-Dr. Allyn King Foster.
12:00 N.-University Students will
meet at Guild House, opposite the
Church. Dr. Foster.
5:30 P. M.-Student Social Hour.
6:30 P. M.--Dr. Allyn King Foster.
Final address.

FIRST METHODIST
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, Minister

"Religion in the
Mind and Life
of the Student"
Will be
the general Theme
of

METHODIST STUDENTS
CENTER
WESLEYAN GUILD
Cor. State and East Huron
12:00 Noon--Sunday School.
6:00 P. M.-Devotional Service.
Dr. Fisher, "The Meaning of Re-
ligious Experience," at Presbyterian
Church, (Huron and Division).

Religious Em hasis

Week

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, University Pastor
Mrs. Nellie B. Cadwell, Counsellor of
Women.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "The Christ Message and
the Social Conscience" by Hon. J.
Stitt Wilson of New York City.
12:00 Noon-Student Classes.
5:30 P. M.-Social hour for Young
People and Student Forum. Lead-
er: Dr. F. B.Fisher, Methodist
Church, Ann Arbor.
7:30 P. M.-Mass Meeting in the
auditorium. Hon. J. Stitt Wilson
speaks on the theme, "Creating
Spiritual Leadership for Our
Times."
HILLEL FOUNDATION
615 East University
Rabbi Bernard Heller
11:00 A. M.-Religious Service.
Chapel of Women's League Build-
ing. Rabbi Bernard Heller will
speak on "How to Interest the Col.
lege Student in Religion."
8:00 P. M.-Natural Science Audi-
torium. Rabbi Leo Franklin of
Detroit will speak on "Religion at
Work."
PUBLIC INVITED

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1931
Night Editor--BEACH CONGER, Jr.
CLARIFYING THE ISSUE
By reversing Judge Clark's deci-
sion calling the Eighteenth amend-
ment unconstitutional, the Su-
preme Court has hewn to the ex-
pected course of action. Few either
among the legal profession or the)

February 22 to March 1st
Concluding Services and Meetings
Today and Sunday

laity thought Judge Clark's view IN REPLY.
held water, but many speculated Dear Mr. Huggett:
with interest regarding the Su- When your interesting letter ar-
preme Court's method of dealing rived our engraver, who happened
with the New Jersey's labored ar- to be visiting, offered to re-make
gument- I gratis the plate advertising your
To arrive at his decision, Judge shame, so that you may boast to
Clark had to rule that the Eigh- your friends of inspiring the blank
teenth amendment differed from space in the plate on page 106. You
all other amendments in taking may call at the business office for a
power from the people, and there- refund of our senior charger Off-
fore that it must be ratified not hand I should guess that if the en-
by state legislatures but by direct graver were to pursue this policy
action of the people. The Supreme throughout the book, a great num-
Court found neither half of this ber of plates would not be altered.
argument convincing: o t h e r a- I was surprised to learn of the
mendments take power from the objection .of you "good common-
people, and Congress had author- sensed people" to the Michigan-
ity to submit the amendment either ensian cover, by fault of my dis-
to state conventions, or, as actual- interestedness. If you are a har-
ly happened, to the state legisla- binger of this "common-sensed"
tures. element, it occurs to me that your
The entire issue of repeal is clar- naivete in assuming that the Mich-
ified by the Supreme Court's rul- iganensian has been able to afford
ing, a compensation which may a leather cover since 1915 excludes
justly offset the hankering for pub- you from the group of competent
licity which apparently motivated judges.
Judge Clark to hand down his de- If you are capable of perceiving
cision. From now on, there can be die-stamped and painted rubber as
no doubt but that the long, hard leather, no doubt a similar wrench
Toad to repeal is the only perman- of your imagination could give you
ent means of solving the country's a beautiful cream calf on the 1931
most aggravating problem. There book. It's all up to you.
is no occasion for disheartenment And if you are completely callous
on the part of the anti-prohibition- to modern photography you might
ists, since the action of the Su- try turning the book clockwise un-
preme Court must have been ob- til your artistic sense tells you the
vious to all from the first; yet, the horizontal is reached. I am sure
I don't know what your friends will
decision of the higher curt will think, and would be impolite if I
undoubtedly effect a concentration guessed, but I feel reasonably sure
of legal an& techical arguments in advising for them a similar recti-
in favor of repeal.. ygpres.
There is much to be said. in favor fying process.
Thfrwis mh slate beaad vr- Your suggestion of placing the
of wipng the slate clean and re- cover in the hands of an all-campus
turning powers to the states. The art jury evokes an interesting pic-
prohibition acts have not been en- ture. But why stop at the cover,
forced from the first, are not beings A t
enfocedat resnt wth nytingsir? A true memory book should
enforced at present with anything (drip with "the golden haze of col-
like ordinary stringency. State and lege days," -canoes on the Huron
local officers are the most natural and all of those lovely idyllic visions
and efficient means of making a which will recurr in your reveries
distasteful law prevail. But more forty years from now-and to an

On T u e s d a y, Wednesday and
Thursday of next week Play Pro-
duction will offer "Mrs. Partridge
Presents" by Mary Kennedy and
Ruth Hawthorne as the third lab-
oratory production of the year. It
will be directed by Harry R. Allen.
Tickets may be obtained free from
two to four any afternoon next
week. Phone orders will not be ac-
cepted.
The year that "Mrs. Partridge
Presents" played in New York, it
was chosen as among the ten best
plays of the season by Burns Man-
tle. It tells the story of the revolt
of two children against a widowed
mother who has planned their ca-
reers for them as actor and artist.
After the failure of her plans, the
son fulfills his ambition to become
an engineer and the daughter gets
married. What happens to the
mother is not stated.
"Mrs. Partridge Presents" is the
first three act play to be attempted
by Play Production this year. Like
the two one act play programs it
is produced for the purpose of sup-
plementing class work with practi-
cal productions of a non-commer-
cial nature.
D. II. LAWRENCE
The same issue of the Modern
Quarterly (which, by the way, is,
on sale at Slater's Book Store) con-
tains the subtlest examination of
D. H. Lawrence's literary contribu-'
tion which has appeared since his
death in an article by Herbert S..
Schwartz, formerly music critic of
The Daily.
Applying an interesting and novel
method of literary criticism which
he calls "a study in Lawrence's own
terms," Mr. Schwartz by examining
Lawrence's important and little-
known books on psycho-analysis
and several of his more important
poems reaches the conclusion: "The
tragic paradox of it all is that, hav-

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Allison Ray Ileaps, Minister
Sunday, March 1, 1931
Fred B. Smith, moderator of the Na-
tional Council of Congregational
Churches, guest and speaker. Mr.
Smith will speak three times:
Men's Supper, Saturday evening, on
"The World Situation." Sunday
morning, 10:45. "The Fruits of
Religion.
Sunday evening at 6:30 following
the Student Fellowship Supper,
"Moral Robbery."
BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod of N. A.)
Fourth Ave. between Packard and
Williams
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale
9:00 A. M.-Bible School.
10:00 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "Victorious Obedience of
Jesus."
11:00 A. M.-Service in German.
7:00 P. M. - Young People's
League meeting.
Wednesday Evening at 7:3 0, Lenten
Service.
FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morning Serv-
ice. Sermon topic: "Chirst Jesus."
11:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow-
ing the morning service.

All students are
urged to attend
Special
Student Services
and
Meetings

Lead by Prominent
Religious Leaders
from all parts of
the country.
SEE LEAFLET
AND BULLETIN
NOTICE FOR DETAILS
OF DAILY PROGRAMS

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Streets
Reverend Henry Lewis, Rector
Reverend Duncan E. Mann, Assistant
8:00 A. M.--Holy Comnunion.
9:30 A. M--Holy Communion
(Student Chapel in Harris Hall).
9:30 A. M.-Church School (Kin-
dergarten at 11 o'clock).
11:00 A. M.-Holy Communion,
sermon by the Right Reverend
William P. Remington, D.D.
6:30 P. M.--Student Supper in
Harris Hall. Speaker, Bishop
Remington.
7:45 P. M.-Student Mission-
Closing Services of Religious Em-
phbasis Week."
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. at Fifth Ave.
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor
9:00 A. M.-Sunday School.
10:30 A. M.-Morning Service.
Sermon topic: "Signs of God's
Grace."
5 :30 P. M.---Student Fellowship and
Supper.
6:30 P. M.-Dr. Gould Wickey will
address the students on "Chris-
tianity and Culture."
7:30 P. M-Lenten Service. Sermon
topic: "The Denial by Peter."
ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Third and West Liberty Sts.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor
Sunday, March 1, 1931
9:00 A. M.-German Service.
10:00 A. M.-Bible School.
11:00 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"The Christians' Request; 'We

i

TH EOSOPHY
Offers a philosophy which renders
life intelligible, and which demon-
strates the justice and love which
guide its evolution.

11

11

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan