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May 12, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-12

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______THE MICHIGAN DAILY lollA,
~~Ociati~~~~~o none otn u~Ru

15

Li ERA' L
g }ImLD

AS FLYER

INSPECT MI TCH EL .FIELD
UNDERGOES. ANNUAL TEST

I hul I1

ie Under
y-Six

GIVE'

TALK
)eii for

8

8 OAH HITS BITS
Idaho Senator Says Poicy H-as
Greatly Lowered Livin~g
in Silver Nations.
TARIFF ACTS DEFENDED
Senator fHatrield, Thimseyer of
Iowa. Answer European
Condemnation.
WASHhIGTON, May l.-{R?}-
Senator Borah thinks that. since
half the hau-an family "must ne-
cessarily continue to conduct, its
business, affairs upon a silver basis,"
Great Britain should reverse its
gold polio~ in India,
Chairman ofa the last senate for-
eign relations committee, the Idaho
Republican said in a radio speech
Sunday night that adoption of the
gold standard in India had "dras-
tically lowered", the purchasing
power of nearly 800,000,000 people.
He :made no direct reference to a
resolution approved last week by
fthe International Chamber of Coin-
comerce for a conference on silver but

Irene B easley, known as_ "The
LongTal GUirl from Dixie," will be iamdwt h on onr
male quartet on a program of pop-a
ular mlodies to. be broadcast over
Wt2BW, WBCM, and AC at 7.45
o'clock tonight. Nat Brusilofi's or-
chestra will accompany the singers.
As feature soloist on the Para-
mount Publix piroguam, Morton
DCwiey will sing "Please Don't
Talk About MVe" and "Underneath
Your Window" during the broad-
cast ,of that- hour, over the C~olum-
bia chain., Th orchestra under the
dfrection of Domei~ico Savino will
contribute to the progra~m an open-
ing~ over ture, "Th1e Chimes of
Spi ng"end thec final number, " If
You Can't; Sing, Whistle." Jesse
Crawford will play an organ of his
own "election.

Today's Radio Programs
(Eastern Standard Time)

ty OPE
hed
1the
ed to
tialg
,th~ec
ni hou
r. G.
zlumn
nnasei
can b
usual
er in
Meldo

efiffins a i one spe-h
."ve been annoti6weedI.
of tie Alumni as-
iS e.
on. n~~iler on "the [
h provides for classes " 4
college a ;tle same':
rcl 'sses rnetin~'
' r Y1 an Y oC rnitfn g,
more po ou1r ok the
for the E as' sto xeet
.ars after graduation.
tseare scheduled to
plan.F
peci~ii feunion. V
to thae rular cuss
spezal HvrAngell Colonel and Mrs. Charles A. L
nne . t is year for, it M\itchel field, Long Island, when L
arsuiaen vhe ampe- examination as a pilot in the Unite
res cent rigel~ ad- right: Lindbergh, Mrs. John H. H
to 18711. Ihis class 3- Mr s. Lindbergh
.esr tahe very~ ear "lest -
v&e Tnvrityr:and the
,.ed , yas a, sVcessaci ; to EIATDN fi K
~eay 3 qfthese old
Wee . t~2ei1r in-
,en~ ing the meeting.
alt bee anPnunced. ,ais M1Vonarch ests Auter
id cal, clinics hold Removal of Cataract
and, Friday, June x18
y ,ncI, Saturcy of the From Eye.
it be ti reiion days..PUAIISN . a 1 F)
Stakes plgce on the UCHSNY.Ma11-I)
iday, d, the Alumni ng Prajadlhijok of Siam was rest-
Mens Tuesday. nga Ophr Hall today, after a
it thD°dilug, successful operation for the remo-
hR p.1 oin 5l,*h6h a cataract from his left eye
tsyear $nray "I see the light" he rmre
step of i nA (al ~eitl fe
:be'greatty re~hifoced edaey fe the operation. He
glee club reunion., was conscious of every, detail of
tti act1vities pa n- esthticswerebused.sThree stitch-
;raliuEtes are. the tea es were taken.
use held by President Thne Kin, who traveled half-way
.Ruthven, which*aS a readthpgoetorcies-
last yar, , the ' Y o o eeiesr
niiY uneon in Wae gelal attentionz, asked that his peo-
Sple in Sam be notified of the out-
itm. This year, anrii-me
ept is to be, insta hTord: edcos'blei wscbe
oheg, so that a short 6 dcos ultnwscbe
~ti~ an Preid~t his contry.t read:.
e ii an 1'rsilent "The cataract has been success-
bual ddress to thie'fiully remov ed from the King's left
Z,. gwen at . this tiiie
mtin I ill audi- ee. No cominpication was found in
itb eeesrxy. the operation, and we have every
~.te~ Iwhieh. re ason to believe that the resut
tova ian inte ine f ullbe favorable. The kifig is suf-
_t flile visitbrswill ferhfig no pi
olf toifrn aeats Which It Was signed by Drs. John M.
an the University golf Wheeler, Thomas H1. Johnson, Rob-
eft A. Cooke and Hugh S. M-
tiffs scheduled on the TKe .wng'w hscaRa
1912 Law",1,x913 Eh i- TeKn' w hscaRa
Litxar, 114 edialAdmiral Chayant, was unable to be
s ,nieetixig under the at the operation, having been
.a e1871 literary and stricken with malaria. Today he
18768 Ilterary and eigi- was ,a patient in the Harbor Hospi-
litery., engixneeing, ta,. ew Yrk.
y; 1886 lawc, l terary, Dr, Iago Galdston, executive sec-
n~ 1891 law, alterary, ,rtary of the medical information
ianrpedical; 189 din-hureauof the New :York Academy
n, ,literary, and engi- of, scien~ce, who attended the oper-
literary, enineerinig, tion as an observer, said the
ical; 1906 literary, en- Wound would heal in about a week
p~pd edcal 111and the bandags. would be re-
~eeing ai4 mdicl;moped in about 10 days.
nee diva a1921:m dc literary y vlrtiue oa this operation. it is
5literary, engineeringe .a ,,th Kngwilwih.h
aciiid, Qf glases, have normal, or near
normial vision," he added.

Four
cif the

,ndbergh are shown as they visited
Lindbergh took his annual physical
ed States army air reserves. Left to
:ward, Maj. Percy D. Moulton, and
Ceinvicts Are Human,
D~ensmore Discovers
Prof. Gail E. Densmnore recent-
ly. had' his belief that prisoners
a~re mekely, unfortunate beings,1
still human .despite their incar-
ceration, strengthened by a gift
from the ,,extension class he
tea-ches each Sunday in the new
Michigan State prison at Jack-
sonl.
Inclosed1 in 'a handmade wood-
eni case were a pen and pencil
set a, leather brief case, and a
sincere dedication, penned; in the
ornate style of the late Victor-
ian~ period, with colored floral
decorations. The case was lined
with a flowered design.
VHICAO PUBISHE
ClI ME B Oa h

two other Republican members of
congress did answer attacks madeI
at the congress on American tariff
and war dept policies.
Answers Banker.
Replying to. speeches by Henry
Bell, Englis banker, and Dr. Carl
Bergmann, German delegate, Sena-
tor ,Hatfield of West Virginia con-
I tended ."our protective tariff rates
have enabled. us to set the pace" in
economic development.
"Let us continue to lead, no mat-.
ter how many ask4 us to wait," he
said. "Let, others climb to our level.
Thbat is progress. We cannot afford
to go backward."
jRepresentative Ramseyer of Iowa
said that "if_ our tariff protection
were removed American prices
would. "break" to levels of other
countries. He, contended Democratic
leaders had allied with the foreign
manufacturers and international
bankers to "dictate to the United
States what should be done for the
enrichment of foreigners."
Factor in IDeclinie.
He named the decline in the price
of silver as a big factor in indus-
trial depression and added that
adoption of the gold standard in
India "greatly accentuated" the
"poverty and, unfortunate economic
conditions" of people in that coun-
try.

coAL FIELD0STRI
Organized Workers Ask Remoaval
of Armed Guards From
Harlan District.
HARLAN, Kl., May ll.--(A)--The
months-old controversy in the Har-
lan coal fields as to whether arm-
ed guards are necessary at coal
mines seemed near a showdown to-
day as operators stood by to check
the strength of. a walkout move-
ment which union officials said
would go in effect today.
Af t er a series of meetings
throughout the Harlan district
Suniday union officials announced
hundreds of miners had agreed not
to work unless mine guards were
disarmed today., Operations, dis-
counting. the 'reported strength of
the walkout movement, gave no in-
dication of intention to disarm the
guards.
National guards were on duty in
the Evarts section, where most of
the, past trouble hia been centered.
At Harlan, Sheriff J. H. Blair
was, prepared to present evidence
to the special grand jury investiga-
ting mine disorders that have cost
the lives of five men during the
past few weeks. The jury recessed
Saturday after returning more
than twenty-five indictments, in-
cluding murder counts against W.
B. Jones,_ Evarts. union secretary,
Asa !Cusick, Evarts chief of police,
A. L. Benson, Cusick's assistant,
and~ Joe, Cawood,,Evarts town clerk.
The indictments were based on a
battle Jlast week in which two sher-
iff's deputies, a commissary clerk
and a miner were slain.
Chemist Will Attend
Sei y-Aniuixal Mee ting
Faculty members of the chemis-
try department will go to Lansing
next Saturday to attend the semi-
annual meeting of the Michigan
College Chemistry Teachers asso-
ciation.
The. organization meets each fall
at Ann Arbor, and, each sprin~g at
various {towns in the state. This-
spring, the instructors are guests
of Michigan State' college.

of the most danceable tunes
day will be played by the

Savainah Liners orchestra during
Uir piogram to come over the
N.B3.C. chain through station WJZoih t53 'lc.DnaS
MAert iman directs the following
mnmbers; "Please Give Me Some-
t~hing Lo Remnember You By," "When
Your HaIir Has Turned to Silver"
"Two Little Blue Little Eyes" and
"Maybe It's Love."
3:40-Baseball scores-WJ R
4:00-Pacific Vagabonds-WJZ, WENR
Leo Reisman's orchestra-WWJ, KYW,
WTAMn
4:30-BERT LOWN and i Biltmore or-
ch estra -WB CM, WFBL
5:15---Hrry TUnker and hierlsBarclay orchestra
WBCMI, WFBL, WABC
Peter Van Stceden and his orchestra--
WJZ, WGAR. KYWI
' °-SP.VA ~NAij LI NER~S orchestr.a-WJZI
5:45-Lowell Thomas,-KDKA, WLW. WJZ
S',i'rG i . ~bfe directed by Ludwig
Lawiei--WE,F, WRC
6 :00 -- cv!ATOR ROBERT. LAFOLLE~TTE, Jr.,
c= : at<,r Thon~as Walsh-,-WWJ, WLAF
6 :45--Rarnblers, Gondoiers-WJZ, WENR
7:00 -FRANK CRUMIT AND JULIA ANDLR-
SON -WTWJ, WTAM, WEAF
H-;r:!l Wh iteman, the Jesters -- WJR,
WLV/, KYW
7 :30-Pu'fs of iRhyk~ ---WJR
COON SAN*DERS ,and - his dance or-
crhcstra--WWJ, WGN, WGY
7:45--Roundrt ownois with Irene Beasley -
WLBW, V:BCM, WAIT C
$:30- tapy Wonder Barters--W'WJ, WTrAM
Philco Sympihony Concert - WXYZ,
WLVBV/,, WABC
9:60--L. RQLFE and his dance orchestra
-VVV:'J. WTAM,, WGY
Work~s of G~reat Composers, Lucjille
(en:- piai'i4, I-Iugo Mariani direct-
ino-MWR, KDKA, WGAR1 MR
9:30--Raraniount ublix pro~grarn with MR
TON DO~WNE--WXYZ, WOWAO
10:00-F-,_TCHER 4ENDEIRSON and his or-
chestr ---WABC, WKBW, WLBW ~
Ludwig Lauier directing Slumber NMd-
sik-WJZ, WRC
10:30--Ronanelli -and hassKing :Edward or-.
(;h:kra-WBCMWFBM, WLBW
IJREANI PICTUREfS with Arher Gib-
son, organist-WJR, WFNR, WGAR
or;,hestra--WBCM,. WFBL, W.Al3O
11:00-OZZIE NELSON and his Pelham Heath
Phil Spitalny anid his orchestra-WJZ,
Jack Albin and his orchestra-WTAM
WGAR, WREN
Southwestern Co nnecticut Club
Makes inspection Tour
oif Yale Library.

Deficit is Cuc
The War Dep-rtinen' stud~cy wasr
the first of a series the President
has begunl because of decreasing ine-
come and the incr easin~g Treasury
deficit, which, now is around $800,-
0100,000.
On War Departmient problems the
executive conferred with a number
of officials, including Secretary
Patrick J. Hur"ley, assistant Secre-
tary Payne and Chairman Will R.
wood, of the last House Appropiria-
tions Com~mittee.
Brown Gives Report.
Maj .-Gen. Lytle Brow/n, chief of
Army engineers, reported on the
progress of inland waterways pro-
jects. His reports, it was said, were
received merely in the general con-
sideration of problems and not be-
cause the President had in mind
any particular savings in that di-
rection.
,Other departments will be studl-
fed in succeeding week-ends. Qffl-
cials called the war branch delibe; -
a~tions "mnerely the start of an ex-
haustive study to be continumed in
Washington during the next several
weeks."
To what extent military estab-
lishment officials may agree to trim.
expenses is not known.
(The last annual supply bill for
the department carried about $445,-
1,0,00 of which approximately,
$11,~00,00 was to be devoted tor
non-militaryi activities.
ArehltecR' Bil

HOOVER CN IR
IN M rtITARY Tiff
President plans it a'rttnjr enl.
Reor~anizatwon as MIethiod
of Saving M1oney.
MEETS WITH OFFICIALS
First of Series of Studcies for
Making uip Huige Deficit i
Treasury Is Reported.
IWASHINGTON, Ma 11.--j- A,,;4
orne ste~p inihis ,offorts to,:Si~(
money. for the Qoverlimeit, 'r j-
dent. H-oover i intends to reorg;aniv.O
the. Wear Department,
Just how~ far this reorgarniati4n
will <go, or when and how i)t ill,
become effective has not been an-
nounced, but the tentative decision
Ito make "progressive" changeysa
reached in the President;'s wet~k-end
conferences with oficials of th-at
department at his R apidai, V ',

The new Yale library was inspect,-
ed. by the~ Michigan Alumni club of
Southwestern Connecticut at its
meeting at New Haven on May 7,
according to reports received at the
University.
The group was welcomed in New
Haven by President James R. Ang~ell,
'90, of Yale University, who sjpoke
in Ann Arbo~r recenitly at the P4on-
ors Convocation, and w'ere show~n
trough the new Sterling IVlernorial
library by Prof. Andrew Keogh, '98,
the Yale'Libra'rian. The new library,
which has shelf sp'ace for 3,000,000~
volumnes and facilities for seating
2,000 readers, was planined 'and car-
ried through to completion by Pro-
fessor Keogh.
During inspection of the group of
roomns in which Prof. Car'l F. Schrie-
ber, '07, is carrying odn extens~ive re-
search work, 'Professor Schrieber
gave the group a talk on. tie great
value of the rare volumes included
in the Yale library.

Walter A. Stroing Passes Away
Suddenly After Playinig
Golf With Sonl.
CHICAGO, May 11-R/P)--Stricken'
with heart disease, Walter A..
Str ong, 47-year-old publisher of the
Chicago Daily News. died suddenly'
Sunday shortly after playing a
round of golf with his son, John.
Mr.. Strong 's nine-year-old daugh-j
ter, _Anne, found hixri outstretched
on the floor of hid .bedroom. Believ-
ig' he pad fainted,: she hurried to
her mother for help, and Mrs.
Strong,, assisted by her sonls, Walt-
er, jr., and John, lifted 'him to his
bed. He w7as dead when physicians
atrrived.
The passing of M.lr. Strong came
as a shock to his friends and .asso-
ciates. ;He had appeared to be in
the biest of health.
The funeral, ,will be held. at the
Strogz home Wednesday with bur-
ial ,in R osehill cemetery. Meanwhile
messages of condolence came pour-
ing in, including one to Mrs. Strong
from President Hoover.
Mr. Strong's rise to the head of
the Daily N ews organization was
both steady and rapid. Always re-
girded as a 'keen newspaper work-
3,he began his career when he
, ta'_ted sellingf newspapers for ,the
Tevs, which was founded by Victor
'-awsoln and Melville E. Stone. After
M1\. Lawson's death he became dic-
tator of the Daily News policies;

"Here it. would seem, therefore,"
he asserted, "is one place where
governments could, greatly add to.
the purchasing power of millions, of
people, by undoing what was im-
providently, done., It. would not be
entering upon new lines or ventur-
ing upon a new experiment,,it would~
be conforming to the wishes and
c'ustomns and practices of these
people."
munger Marcher s' End
T rek to Ohio~ Capital
tCOLUMPUS, .0., May 11";(R)-
7%sr eight-day, trek to the, state
capital at an end, Ohio "hunger
marchers,", turned their attention
today to seeking a conference with
Govr. George White and leaders of
the legislature.
Escorted by police, sheriff's dep-
uties and members of the American
Legion, the hikers n reached the
north steps of the capital late Sun-.
day, after entering the city 'from
two directions.

1.

-TYPEWRITER
REPAIRING
All makes of machin~es.
Our equipment a4nd per-
t p n n e l are consider-ed
among the best in the State. The result
of twenty years' careful building.
0. D. ~flRYL
114 South State St. Phone 6615

BfIGHTr SPOT
802 PACKARD ST.
TODAY,, 11:30 to 1:30
SPAGHETT'"I WITH ,MEAT BALLS~
CERRY JEILO
COFFEE OR MILK
30c
5:30 'co7:30,
INDIVIDUAL C1 CEN PIES
~I AL ,ROAST
5SS TEAK(
PORK ROAST
MASI-1lDOR lFRIED POTATOES.
CREAMED CORN OR
STRING BEANS
35c

fIT V

COMPNY
Teepjone .7112

1I

1

IN&n'cy 'Cairr6Il "Stolen

HeavenA'

II

e annual initiatio~n of pledges
Alpha Nu chapter of Kappa'
Sig'ma, national debating so-
, *~ill be held at 4 o'clock this
rniobp in the Alpha Nu room
he fourth floor of An{gell, hall.
e initiation will be followed by
annual banquet to be held to-
.at 6:'15 o'clock in room~ 222
ie Union. The principal speak-
ill b~e Prof. R. D. T. Hollister, of
speech departmnt. S h o'r t°
ches will also be. given ,by Al-
Donohue, '31, LeIoy Selmeir,.
Lyle Eiserman, national pres-
t of the organzation. .

Starting
Wednesdayt

I

°D bate Club Will Give
'-ohor A-wards Ton i ght
The annual banquet of the Adel-
'phi House of. Representatives, lit.-
erary and, forensic organization, is
to be held at 6J5 o'clock tonight, at
the League. The speaker will be
Prof. Carter, H. Goodrich, of the
economics department. I(
,At the banquet there will be pre-
sented the honor award given to
the outstanding member o'f the
society,'each year. There will also
be a presentation of gavels to the,
two speakers and of keys to the
members of the team that t.ook part
in the annual Adelphi-Alpha Nit
debate.___ - -

WANT ADS PAY

,.
...
_.
r. ._._. _._.. _. _---yn.,,y
. ,. r,..--_ _
....... ..u..w 3 e
t rrrrrr

VIENNA

ENCH'ANTED CITY!
Where ,life is. a glass of buib-
bling chamnpagne!r, Where love
is a rich intoxicating wine!
Where yesterday is forgotten!
'Where tomorrow never comes!

{
E
I
(',

W IT N EY
UI l

NO1MA SHEARtER
BOB MONTGOMERY

"VIENNESE
NIG TS91

in
tr-an~a~er

I

'ING

I
eft_

2:00-3:40
7:00-9:00

K

2

a'y'"

K1

(WERE MADE FOR LOVE)
ALEXANDER GRAY
LOUISE FAZENDA
BERTRO6AC H
ALSO

GEOftG1E O'BRIEN
"FAIR WARNING"

Itll I IIF T IIIII~liI I
MVON., MAY 18
Seats Thurs.
ETHEL . I
'" rerio,

11111

-I

One of the year's best shows

Talkartc

aon

II

111 11111111

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