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March 28, 1931 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-28

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THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

. .

TH "E vMICH vIG.aN a I y . fLYATRAY ARH{3,13

SSE TURDAY5 MA CH 23, 1931
inn ewssenin. .. waww w

DR3 AE FINISHES
T I Al
MICRF'SATEST
MASTAON XHIBIT
Most Complete Speciman of The
'Elephas Jeffersoni' Now
in Museum.
IS 17 FEET IN LENGTH
Was Uncovered in Cass County
1Q Feet Below Surface
by George Wagner.
Mthigan's bigges, newest and
mb ' complete specimen of "Ele-
phas Jeffersoni' hasbeen unveiled
to the public. The bones of the
mastodon lie on an exhibition stand
more than 17 feet long, in the Uni-
versity museums building, roped-
off on four sides to fence away the
curious. I
Behind the exhibition is a story.
One day during August, 1929, Dr.
Emne Case, director of the mu-
selm of paleontology, received a
note from Anita J. Walker, school
commissioner of Cass county, re-
porting that specimens of bones
had been unearthed on the farm of
George D. Wagner, north of Union.
They ha d been discovered about 10
feet from the earth's surface while
Wagner had been excavating a marl
bed.
Lived in Post-Glacial Age.
Upon examining the finds, which
wee determined to be teeth, Dr.
Case pronounced the discovery to
be the bones of an elephant of the
post-glacial age, who had probably
migrated north from the southern
warmth after the Wisconsin stage
of the- ice age. Forthwith W. H
Btettner, preparateur in paleon-
tology, prepared to Wagner's farm
and after more than three week's
excavation, he shipped the bones to
Ann Arbor to be prepared for exhi-
bition.
"The bones were very rotten,"
says the card place in front of the
display, that explains its state. But
after more than three months'
work, during which the plaster was
broken off by bits, the bones hard-
ened by applications o shellac and
duco cement, and cleaned, plans
for preparing the exhibition were
begun.
To enable mounting in a position
similar to that in which they lay in
the marl bed on Wagner's farm,
photographs taken at the time of
the discovery were followed in
placing the bones on the exhibition
stand.
Four Cheek Teeth Intact.
The remarkability of the speci-
men, said Dr. Case, lays in the fact
that all four cheek teeth, each
about 16 inches long and weighing
several pounds, were intact in the
marl bed. Although no trace of the
tusks were found, and some of the
skull bones had been taken by
souvenir hunters and friends of
Wagner, the completeness of the
vertebrae, pelvis, and other body
parts enabled the most complete
reconstruction of such a mastodon
ccom nnYmlished inMich'an

PORTO RICANS GREET HOOVER WITH HEARTY
RECEPTION AS HE ENTERS CITY OF SAN JUAN IL Iii
" -
.. .Miciae1 Pwrgment's Radio Talk
Emphasizes Need of Contact
With High Schools.
Emphasizing the necessity of co-
operation between the University
and high schools throughout the
state, Prof. Michael S. Pargment.
<::.of the French department, yester-
;, day in a radio address stated that
the lack of close contact between
the two has been detrimental to
high school and University instruc-
tion.
"There are symptoms, however,
that the era of loose contact be-
tween the high schools and the uni-
versities is gone," he said. "Several
universities, foremost among which
is your own University of Michigan,
are now making serious efforts to
!bring their faculties into closer
contact with those of the second-
ary schools, and to have them co-
operate with one another."
Professor Pargment outlined the
ideals of the French department,
AssociatedPress Phtits policies and practices. "The de
partment does not limit its activi-
This Associated Press telephoto shows President Herbert Hoover, in back seat with Gov. Theodore ties to philology and literary his-
Roosevelt, Jr., entering San Juan, Porto Rico. Porto Ricans lined the streets and gave the United States' tory, and to the training of schol-
ars. It now has one of the best
chief executive a hearty reception. ~ -- ;A- - A -4-.. -_.-._

i

I

What's Goingon

_ ,

!I

.
t
t
2
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r
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M1x

ANN ARBOR NEWS-BRIEFS

ICC RHTC
G IV, HA TALK9

Reverend J. Wood Dies
in Pontiac Hospital
Rev. James E. Wood, former chap-
lain at St. Joseph's Mercy hospital,
and until his death assistant pas-
tor at Holy Trinity parish, Detroit,
died early Friday morning in a
Pontiac hospital, following an ill-
ness of three weeks.
He left here about a year ago to
become assistant pastor at St. Leo's
church, Detroit. Later he was ap-
pointed assistant at Holy Trinity.
Requiem high mass will be sol-
emnized at 10 o'clock Monday
morning at Holy Trinity church.
The sermon'will be preached by Fr.
Carey, of St. Thomas.
County Doctors Oppose
Pending Medical Bills
Pending bills in the state legis-
lature which, physicians say, will
materially affect the medical pro-
fession, are opposed by the Washte-
naw County Medical society.
Resolutions, prepared by the com-
mittee on public health, and adopt-
ed by the society, prote"t the bills
calling for registration of all spe-

cialists and a board of examiners
for chiropractors.
In the iesolution protesting the
establishment of an examining
board for chiropractors, the society
said that the bill would give a form
of legal recognition to chiroprac-
tors, who, it is pointed out, are not
required to comply with sufficient
requirements to practice.
Services for Ream
to be Held Sunday
Funeral services for Grover C.
Ream, 45, of 520 North Main street,
who died Thursday afternoon, will
be, held at 2 o'clock Sunday after-
noon at the Hildinger-Slittler fun-
eral home. Rev. Theodo7 e Schmale
will officiate. Interment will be in
the Bethlehem cemetery.
He is survived by his widow, two
children, Robert- E. and Gretchen
L., at home; three brothers, Win-
field E. of Sioux City, Ia., William
B. of Metzger, Ore., and John B.
of Ann Arbor; four sisters, Miss
Rebecca Ream of Portland, Ore.,
Mrs. H. H. Person of Campbell,
Cal., Mrs. Everett Kenyon, of Oak-
land, Cal., and Mrs. O. T. Albro, of
Whitmore Lake.

'Architecture in Education'
Theme of Lecture by
Irving Pond.

Is

The value of architecture in the'
attainment of culture was empha-
sized yesterday by Irving K. Pond
in his lecture, "Architecture in Edu-
cation" which was the last of a
series of four addresses delivered
in the auditorium of the Architec-
ural school.
In architecture, which he refer-
red to as the greatest of the arts,
the material side is apparent butl
the spiritual element which is just
as important, must also be sensed.
"That object," Pond said, "which
does not stimulate a spiritual in-,
terest has missed its purpose and is
not architecture." In discussing
this, he stated that beauty in ar-
chitecture must be apprehended
and that rhythm is important in
giving beauty to a structure.
Of rhythm in architecture, Pond'
is of t1Re opinion that they attract
like rhythms and that conscious-
ness of beauty enters into the per-
ception at an early age, especially
when trying to discern the purpose
of .9 buildinq

organized and most modern schools
in the country for the training of
teachers, and is keenly interested
in all problems pertaining to meth-
od and organization," he said.
The policy towards students com-
ing from other institutions has
changed in several ways, according
to Professor Pargment, who stated
I that "practically all of our elemen-
tary and intermediate courses are
so arranged as to be independent
of one another. To avoid wasteful
duplication or disastrous gaps, we
do not classify a student according
to the number of units he presents,
but we also take into account his
actual preparation," he said.
It was also pointed out that it is
harmful for the student to drop a
language course after taking it for
only one year.
"Whenever possible foreign lang-
uages should be carried through
not less than three years, prefer-
ably through all four. It is better
from every point of view to study
one language for four years than
two languages for two years each,"
he said.
JAPANESE PRINTS
TO BE EXHIBITED
Alumni Memorial Hall Is Scene
of Showing in April.
Under the auspices of the Ann
Arbor Art association, an exhibi-
tion of Japanese prints will be held
in the north land south galleries
of Alumni Memorial hall, from
April 26 to May 10.
Several prints have already been
secured, among them a few primi-
tives, Mrs. John Waite, president
of the organization, said yesterday.
On the second Sunday of the ex-
hibit, it was announced, there will
be a gallery talk on the prints, ex-
plaining many interesting features
about them. There will also be a
catalogue issued containing infor-
mation about each exhibit.
Mrs. Waite has asked for infor-
mation about prints, owned by res-
idents here, which might be ex-
hibited.
The Alumnae Faculty Women's
club is also holding an exhibition
or original paintings in the west
gallery of the hall from April 26
to M4ay 2.
Women's Leaguers at the Univer-
sity of Illinois are raising money by
giving a musical comedy, "Courts
and Appeals."

TORATRES
Majestie - Evelyn Laye in "One
Heavenly Night" with John Boles
and Leon Errol.
Michigan - "Little Caesar" with
Edward G. Robinson and Douglas
Fairbanks, jr.
Wuerth-"Scarlet Pages" with El-
sie Ferguson.
GENERAL
Danoing -. At the Union, the
League, Granger's ballroom.
Stnaip C0b-Exhibit by Dr. Hos-
kins, of Detroit, at 7:30 o'clock in
room 302 of the Union.
GoVERNMOR CAGE
Oklahoma Head to Investigate
University Morality
at Same Time.
OKLAHOMA CITY, Mar. 24.-(-P)
-Governor W. H. (Alfalfa Bill)
Murray, who believes in the homely
educational ways he learned at a
little Texas college, today laid
charges of "flagrant immorality"
and misuse of funds at the door of
the University of Oklahoma.
He said the University board of
regents would consider the results
of an "investigation of crime" at
the University by Alva McDonald,
once United States marshall, sent
secretly by Murray to Norman to
conduct the probe. The board alone
is empowered to remove faculty
members.
Although he would not immedi-
ately comment, Dr. W. B. Bizzell,
University president, left Norman
late today to confer with the gov-
ernor. He was expected to call a
special meeting of the regents lat-
er.
"We've got the goods on them
and we'll blow them out of the wa-
ter," said the governor, who alleged
he had uncovered purchase of in-
struments never used by the school
band, wholesale expense account
padding by a traveling faculty
member, and flagrant cases of im-
morality."
It already was known the gover-
nor had started the investigation at
f the University, a sore spot with him
since he took office, and recom-
mended drastic curtailment of ath-
letic activities, an eight-hour day
for professors, lower salaries for
coaches and few thrills all around
the campus,
250 Given Guest Cards
for Relations Parley
Guests cards for the Human Re-
lations Parley have been diltribut-
ed to 250 students and faculty mem-
bers, William Kearns, '32, chair-
man, announced last night. The
conference will begin at 3:30 o'clock
today in the west gallery of Alumni
Memorial hall.
Members of the sponsoring com-
mittee, composed of Michigan res-
idents interested in the problem of
religious differences, who have aid-
ed in financing the parley, were
also announced by Kearns. They
are Regent Esther E. Cram, of Ann
Arbor, Willard Pope, Milford Stern,
Fred M. Butzel, Ferris D. Stone,
Henry Wineman, and Albert Kahn,
all of Detroit.

INTERETIG113
Democratic National Committee
Considering Business
as Next Issue.
WASHINGTON, Mar. 27.--P_
Bursts of prophecy concerning 1932
followed today in the path of de-
velopments that promised an inter-
esting if not tumultuous political
future.
As observers scanned the horizon,
they based their deductions on the
following:
Some southern Democrats are
urging that business be the issue
in the elections and that their next
party convention ignore anti-pro-
hibition proposals made at the re-
cent meeting of their national com-
mittee
Senator Norris doubts that in-
dependents will help Democrats to
organize the new senate.
Norris and representative La-
guardia have pledged co-operation
between house and senate progres-
sives.
Dissension between the major
political parties over New York and
Chicago has brought up Tammany
and episodes of the Iarding admin-
istration.
Leaders of a movement for a
special session have been told their
efforts probably will be fruitless.
Members of the southern Demo-
cratic wing have begun their cam-
paign to prevent convention ap-
proval of some platform planks
suggested by Chairman Raskob of
the national comittee.
This campaign is an outgrowth
of the controversy which followed
Raskob's recommendations at the
recent meeting. Among other things
he proposed retention of the Eigh-
teenth amendment but convention
approval of another constitutional
change to give states control of
liquor. Some of his suggestions as
to changes' in laws affecting busi-
ness also have been criticized.
Athletic Fraternity
Sets Initiation Date
Arrangements for another issue
of the Phi Epsilon Kappa Review
were made, and a date for the ini-
tiation of the Phi Epsilon Kappa
pledges was set for April 2 at a
;meeting of the society last night in
the Union building. The organiza-
tion admits all men who are out-
standing in athletics, and who
maintain a certain scholastic aver-
age.
Air Transport Firms
Announces New Lines
Inauguration of several new air-
lines from Detroit to Cleveland,
Chicago, New York, and Washing-
ton by the tri-motored planes of
the Century Air Lines and Nation-
al Air Transport was announced
yesterday by the student travel
bureau at the Union.
S CROSLEY AMRAD BOSCH
ISHOP

UNION DOES NOT PE
TO GRADUAT

V Y"r ry. A rs lr f r+ r a arr r ev ! : X w-,.

Group
200

Employs More Than
Students, Says Story
in 'Alumnus.'

Recognizing the worth of the Michigan's U n i o n, employing
specimen, Wagner has donated it more than 200 students. may not be
to the state and the museum. so well known to outsiders but it
"It is particularly interesting," doesn't have to be advertised to
hremarkedm r. Case, "because it alumni and undergraduates of the
sowsifrom the age of the bed i1 University, states Dr. Frank E. Rob-
which it was found, that the ele- bins, assistant to the President, in
bhant lived in Michigan during the bis assistat o t dent, in
days when the last ice of the gla- his weekly feature on today's Alum-
vial age was disappearing from the nus cover.
:.tate, perhaps not more than 10 or The tremendous return on the
15 thousand years ago." Standing investment which Michigan men
about 10 feet, six inches at the enjoy is clearly depicted by the 140
shoulders, it was the southern type, per cent income which students ex-
(f elephant, "not the hairy or wooly tract in working their way through
nammoth of the colder regions," school at the Union building.
Ca explained. "Michigan's wonderful Union does
Dr. Caseexpla d..In the year 1929-30, Dr. Robbins
says in the feature, the Union paid
CAMPUS CHANGED more to its student employes than
TO AGED ALUMNI it collected from the entire male,
In 1862, Students in UniversNey
Numbered 390.
When alumni who attended the
University from 1855 to 1871 return
in June for the Haven-Angell re-
union, they will find the campus TODAY!1!
much changed from the days when
they lived in Ann Arbor. The rImantic ad vetir(
year-old boys" were here. of atimid umey bo
In 1862 the students in the Una- e'outo teal
versity numbered 390. Approxi- Nvoliallidentdity forol
mately 181 of the numbertwere ein 'z' ' it
the literary college, 152- in the med- T'uitzii I ihe n \mi~f
ical school, 15 chemistry students,
I ~ ~ Irilfi ebi.
and 42 taking partial courses. Lmns I"
By 1871 the enrollment of the
University had grown to 1,110 stu-
dents. The literary college still re-
tained its popularity with 454 stu-
dents, there were 34 in the phar-
macy college, 31 medical students,
and 307 in the Law school.
BRIGHT SPOT
802 PA+CKARD ST.
TODAY, 11:30 to 1:30
TWO EGGS ANY STYLE Also
WITH tO IA
BACON AND TOAST ROUGH IDEA OF
MEAT. PIES WITH HEAD LOVE"

ED AL E V iSLNG1 Pond also described the methods
., SA YS DR. ROBBINS in which the student of architec-
ture uses the materials of studying
co a body in the form of dues architecture and the analysis and
for c _sting expenses. During that crilcism.Architecture, he said; can
fiscal csr the net total of Union be analyzed on both a material and
fees amounted to $67,491.40. Sum- abstract ground. It is the abstract
mer Session fees added $4,252.32 to theories which lend an air of mys-
this figure. Half of this amount, tery to the art.
according to the present schedule,
and 'all the Summer Session pay- Comedy Club Tryouts
ments are counted as dues and go Will b Held Tu dy
into the operating account. Thei eHuesday
rest is credited to the capital ac- Students who wish to tryout for
count and eventually will be used Comedy Club will meet from 4 until
either for retirement of indebted- 6omedyckluswaylameronin
ness endwmet orbuidingpur 6 o'clock Tuesday afternoon in
ness, endowment or building pur- Sarah Caswell Angell hall. A sec-
,poses. , ond meeting will be held Thursday
"Thus the Union received from afternoon to determine the stu-
students' dues about $36,000 for dents who will be asked to become
operating expenses during the year," members of the organization.
Dr. Robbins concluded, "and at the Those trying out should memor-
same time it was employing about ize a three-minute selection from a
125 students regularly and 75 others I play, Richard Humphreys, '31, pre-
at certain rush seasons, Daying sident, said yesterday.
them during the year $266,910.72 s sadyetrdy
and $23,391.75 in meals-a total of
$50,302.47._LAST r
"TODAYI

WE SELL
WE RENT
WE SERVICE
Tel. 2-2812

Radios

61..,W.lam

LAST
TIMES
TODAY

4 j§MWF *AW AWW 'M
Fh

Continuous
1:30-11:00

U

4

With
EDWARD G. ROBINSON
DOUG FAIRBANKS JR.
Rico ruled supreme, for in his racket he was judge,
jury and executioner. He made only one mistake in his life
--he tried to break a bond of love!
The Gangster.Picture
ADDED ATTRACTIONS
"their ives Vacations"
An Excellent Comedy

f ,LSEFE GUwith

EXTRA
SECOND CHAPTER
"INDIANS ARE COMING"

COMING SUNDAY
"FIGHTING CARVANS"

U

MONDAY, APRIL 6
KENNETH MACGOWAN and JOSFH VERNER REED
preNE
IN A NEW PLAY BY BL'NN W LLW

ART

& MRs. B OTTLE

An hil rinus comedy upon the pretentiousness
of the .arty" artists and adolescent love

PAT T A.C

D A PXATTk i

m

I v/AU f 13 l ARt~AMOUN~YT I

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