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February 19, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

oT'T~' ?ILTOLTr.ANT fATI V

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THURSDAY, FM3RUAIRY 19, 1937. L- 71 t, V1 r 4 r 1s u r I

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MRS. COOiDGE WILL BE SPONSOR
30rvrnii0 EWHEN OCEAN LINER IS LAUN
PL AY REHEARSAS
Choruses of 'Came the Dawn'
to Practice Earlier Than.
Usual Monday.
Choruses for "Came the Dawn,
the 1931 Junior Girls' Play, wil Z x
meet the rest of this week accord-
ing to the schedule~ wnich has been
planned by Mary Rich and Loisf
Sandler, chairman of the dance
committee. - -
At 4 o'clock today chorus C will
rehearse in the Committee room
while chorus G is rehearsing in the
Cave, both in the League building.
At 5 o'clock chorus F will rehearse
in the Cave, and chorus E in ther
Committee room.
Tomorrow choruses A and D will
practice at 4 o'clock in the Cave'
and Committee room, respectively,r
while at 5 o'clock chorus B will
meet in the Cave and chorus E in
the Committee room.
Because no classes are being held a
Monday, rehearsals are being held

CHED

D[IIPU STUOINTS MEETINGS OF LEAGUE OF NATIONS
INSPIRE WORK OF VIOLET OAKEYIJIIVIILIL~
IN PR O KO I L TO KE O MITIArtist Expresses Minds as Wei very quality, in that they inadvert- AR ipIT IT
HI EAR BRIEN SPEAK p a ently portay the all-powerful force
Sujpeaacts.ofHer which lies behind the movement
Yearly Fete Honoring French S Csf'32For the most part Miss Oakley's Penny Carnival Chairmen Begin
Saint Forms Subject By '' sketches are carried out in the me- Plans for Annual
With the sudden concern which dium of chalk and pastel, and she Event
of Lecture. has arisenon the campus over the works in a very fine and absoluteEv
position of the United States re- line. She is fundamentally a cari-
Jeanne d'Arc and Orleans were garding the approbation of the caturist, for her every line and With the announcement of com
the subjects of the lecture which World Court movement, it is of in- caturimtdfor herheveryslihe nd mittee members for the fifth an
World ~~~~~every molding emphasizes the indi- mte ebr o h it n
Manson M. Brien of the French de- terest to consider the work of the vidual However, she uses the art nual Penny Carnival, to be held
partment gave before the Cercle woman artist, Violet Oakley, which o aiauentfrstr si under the auspices of W. A. A.
SFrancais yesterday afternoon in the was inspired through just such an the case of many an artist, but o Wednesday evening,. March 4,in
Romance Language building. interest and sympathy. Returning the better understanding and in- Barbour gym, are preceding under
He spoke of Orleans as being from the meetings of the seventh, terpretation of these men's person- the direction of Jean Botsford, '33,
known as a quiet, sad city full of eighth, and ninth sessions of the alities. general chairman of the event. Miss
older people waiting to die but said League of Nations, she brought with Botsford will be assisted by a cen-
that this is not entirely true as her many sketches of the men who Some of the portraits which she tral committee of five members,
there are movie houses, dance halls, have acted as the impetus to the has created as a result of her con- which is composed of the various
and shoes and that the younger spirit out of which the World Court tact with these men are: Viscount chairmen.
people make it a gayer place on was born. 3enex Dare Rachael Crowdy, Nico- Barbara Braun, '33, is in charge
Sundays and holidays. Before undertaking this trip, 3as Daecad Crod Nc- of booths, and Parrish Riker, '33,
where she met all of the subjects las Titulesco, and Salvador de Ma- o ots n ars ie,'3
Although it was 502 years ago rdariaga. will act as her assistant. Anna
that Jeanne d'Arc saved the city of of her historical portraits she had di Neberle, '33, is chairman of aater
Orleanstheyhave fete commem- had excellent preparation in her The sketch of Nicolas Titulesco of tainment, and Margaret Scher-
orating this each year which he work on the mural paintings which Roumania is of particular interest ma
described as beginning on the first she created for the State Capitol of in that the picture includes several ckn T3inse e an let '3
of May with bands playing at all Pennsylvania. In order to execute small drawings of hands and heads, And '32.
the historical places in the city. On her paintings she did a great deal all in different attitudes. This amal-Cgoodk332.
the seventh of May, the ceremon- of research on the life of William gamation of several drawings into Clara Grace Peck, '33, has been
ihs peegin wt the present- Penn and through his study MISS one like a page from her notebook chosen publicity chairman, and ha4
ies proper begin with the presentb Oakley evolved an understanding iS most effective in that it catches selected Josephine Stern, '33, Kath-
th n toJtedAso nnr iyof the forces which stand behind all the varying aspects of the sub- erine Barnard, '33, Margaret Keal;
the mayor to the bishop. any great political and world-wide ject, his expressive hands, his prom- '33, and Jean Bentley, '33, to serve
That night, the cathedral, whichm m inent lips, his strong brow; and all as members of her committee. Mar-
is helages i Fanc, s ll igt-movements.
is the largest in France, is all light Miss Oakley is an artist who of this in a paucity of line and garet O'Brien, '33, has been ay-
ed with red fire. M. Brien told of paints personalities; her lines and with a great strength of conviction. pointed Daily assistant. Jane Fec-
the religious, civil, and military forms express the minds of her heimer, '33, is finance chairman,
ceremonies which take place the subjects equally well as their pecu- and her committee is composed of
next day in which the great statue liar physiological characteristics. Aranen Clark, 'mi, is comey o
of Saint Jeanne reviews the sol~ Pethaps in her own keen sympathy Chi Omega Award for '33, Adele Ewing, '33, Gladys Schro-
diers, for the movement which these men Best Sociology Thesi der, '33, and Helen DeWitt, '33.
are sponsoring she has imbued B S i y eEach house on campus will have
VISITING DEAN TO them with almost too much of an Frances E. Clark, '33, of Saginaw a booth, and prizes will be offered
Siintellectual keenness. But in spite has been awarded the Chi Omega for the most attractive, and the
A AOA'Uof the similar alertness which in- prize of $25.00 which is presented most profitable. A meeting of the
vades all of her portraits as a result every year to the women student athletic managers of all the houses
of this sympathetic bias, they are who writes the best thesis in Socio- was called yesterday to consider
on Foreign Study. all the more interesting for this logy 51. the types of booths which will bC
"The topic of her paper was 'The used.
Miss Winifred Robinson, dean of Zeta Phi Eta to Hold Negro-Mexican Problem of Sagin-.
women at the University of Dela-.. aw' and received the prize because As Mme. Anna ?avlowa, world-
ware, will be the main speaker at Its Formal Initiation of its sympathetic treatment of the famous dancer, called London her
the meeting of the American Asso- Sunday, February 22 situation," stated Dr. Roy H. home, her body was cremated these
ciation of University Women to be Holmes, professor of sociology, after a period of lying in state.
held at 3 o'clock Saturda nater-

earlier in the afternoon than us-
ual. Choruses E and F will meet at
3:30 o'clock in the Committee room
and Cave, respectively. Chorus A
will rehearse at 4:30 o'clock in the
Committee room, and chorus C will
rehearse at the same time in the
Cave.
Desks May Harmonize
With Furniture, Uses,
Period, Type of Room
"There is no reason why a writ-
ing desk cannot be both serviceable
and in harmony with the rest of
the furniture in the room," de-
clares an article in a popular mag-
azine. The author further explains
this statement by advising the
prospective buyer first of allto
think where she wants it placed
and the use that willbe made of
For instance, a guest room desk,
which will be used for the infre-
quent writing of letters can be less
substantial than the one which a
husband. will use when he brings
home his papers from the office.
The business girl's desk will need
space for the storing of many arti-
cles, the downstairs hall will re-
quire a tall narrow desk at which
the household accounts may be
kept, an aristocratichsecretary will.
serve admirably in the living room,
while in the sunroom a broad-arm-
ed writing chair would be received
with gratitude.
Hanging bookshelves contribute
an air of individuality to a desk
any place. A cabinet on top with
glass-paned doors is still another
arrangement which will convert the
desk into a secretary-bookcase. A
desk of this type will give the room
where all the chairs and tables are
low an added interest through their
higher mass. In a practical angle,
they are almost indispensable, par-
ticularly if your home is a one-
room apartment, for the upper cab-
inet may be a china closet, behind
the slant front may be a mirror,1
and the many drawers below could
be used for storing everything.
Completing an aeroplane trip
around the world, Mrs. Victor
Bruce, British flier, was slightly in-
jured in Baltimore yesterday when
her plane overturned as she neared,
the end of her flight. Due to the
accident she had to forego a recep-
tion which was to have been given
at the British embassy in her hon-
or.

Associated Press Photo
Mrs. Calvin Coolidge,
Wife of the former president of the United States, who will act
as sponsor at the launching of the'new Dollar liner, President Coolidge,
February 21, at Newport News, Virginia.
MISS KA THLEEN ROBERTSON GIVES
ADVICE ON HOW TO KEEP BUDGETS

Plans for Reserve Fund Should
be Worked Out Before
Marriage .
Can two live more cheaply than
one? This question has been a
mooted one for years. The Univer-
sity is doing its bit to outline bud-
gets and plans for living expenses
in a course offered on the campus,
and Kathleen Robertson in McCall's
for March offers advice on weak
budgets.
Supposedly adequate incomes,
Miss Robertson states, rarely are
adequate. In fact, the first ten
years of married life finds the bud-
get constantly stretched to cover
the various claims on the family in-
come.
Figures are obtainable only for
"average families," Miss Robertson
says. The members of the "white-
collar" class of the United States
have an average income of $2,000 a
year, exclusive of the money earned
by the married women who still re-
tain their positions after marriage.
A balance is difficult to make be-

11

tween the actual money earned by
a married woman and the subse-
quent loss to the family income be-
cause of hurried marketing, pay-
ment for cleaning or other services,

and the Tact that the employed noonain)the Etelutayi Husey
woman must be well-dressed. Work- noon in the Ethel Fountain Hussey
ing women throughout the country lounge in the Women's League
earn an average salary of $13.75, so building. She will speak on 'Oppor-
the woman's ,contribution to the tunities for Foreign Study," a plan
family income is usually small which the University of Delaware
A reserve fund on hand, in the has sponsored for several years.
shape of savings accounts or per- Miss Mercy Hayes, of Detroit, the
fectly safe bonds, will serve as one state scholarship chairman, will be
form of insurance against unfore- present also.
seen contingencies of all sorts. Most Miss Robinson, who is a graduate
young married couples do not seri- of Michigan, will discuss and ex-
ously consider this kind of protec- plain the plan whereby students
tion before marriage. Though sys- from the University of Michigan
tematic saving may be planned, can receive credit for work done in
sudden illness or loss of jobs may foreign universities.
completely use up the savings of a-
year.
These reserve funds give a "feel-
ing of serenity," the most "potent
argument" in their favor. "The SCHOOL OF M
tragedy of so many married men is
that their responsibilities have tied (No Admis
them irrevocably to their jobs.---

Initiation of fifteen women to
Zeta Phi Eta, honorary speech and
arts sorority, has been announced
by Hannah Lennon, '31 Ed., presi-
dent. The ritual service which will
be formal, will take place from 2
to 6 o'clock Sunday, February 22,
in the Garden room of the League
building. The names of those to be
initiated will be announced later.
Plans for second semester tryouts
were made Tuesday night at a
meeting of the organization. They
will take place March 3. Written
invitations will be sent out at this
time.

{,
1
i
I

hat You Girls Need
is a
Touch, of Spring!
And the College Shop has hundreds
of suggestions for that very touch,.

OSlO CONCERTS
sion Charge)
E. ZEUCH

" - just a few of the remark-
able values to be found at the
Big Little Shop

WILLIAM

I

Wed., February

Organist
18, 4:15, Hill Auditorium

here are a few..
r-

An

Frame your waves

Chiffon and Service
Hose
A fine thread hose, full-fashioned
and with all the features of a
nore expensive number.
$1900
Cape Gloves
A South African Cape glove in
black, willow, acorn and beaver at
the unheard of price of
$1.9

Silk Net Hose
A completely new showing of the
ever popular silk net hose-so
good for school and sports wear.
$1.00
Hose and Glove
Repair Service
Now we can offer a glove repair
service as speedy and efficient as
our hose repair service.

Hats that are
different
Felt, Straw or Ribbon
Mace on the head
$5.00 and up
McKINSEY HAT
SHOP
227 South State

MAUD OKKELBERG
Pianist
Sun,, March 1, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
DAVID MATTERN, Conductor
Sun., March 15, 4:15, Hill Auditorium
HANNS PICK
Violoncellist, and
ALICE MANDERBACH
Accompanist
Sun,, March 22, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
WASSILY BESEIIRSKY
Violinist, and
MABEL ROSS RHEAD
Pianist, in Sonata Recital
Sun., March 29, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
SCHOOL O MUSIC TRIO

Crisp dotted swiss, batiste or linen, $1.95 and $2.50. Pastel
smart designs, $3.50 and $5.95.
\~ ;:<c;

A Smart
$1.95 to

I

The Laura Belle Shoppe
SOUTH ST ATE STREET AT LIBERTY STREET

.

Pull-on Gloves

1.

$3.95

MILADY
Black Kid with White
Underlay.
Putty Beige Calf with Brown
Underlay.

The Inlaid erforation
One of the smartest, brightest fashion notes
for Spring is the inlaid perforation. Here is
the clever, tried and true Milady Tie, made
of Black Kidskin with White underlay, or,
if you prefer, Putty Beige Calfskin with
Brown underlay. It's swanky, girls, and very
sophisticated, may we add.

pull-on gloves of smooth kid that wrinkle about the wrists so smartly
...off-white, beige and black . . . four to eight button lengths.

Wassily Besekirsky
Violinist
Joseph Brinkman

Hanns Pick
Violincellist

White and Colored Jewelry

Pianist
Sun., April 5, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
THELM A NEWELL
Violonist, and
T 01SEt NFI-ON Da ;t inSnna a

-

filI

$1 to $4.95
White complements the dark shades as well as pastel shades
coral, turquoise and jade . . . choker and longer lengths.
T rJ'

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