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March 19, 1931 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-19

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19, 1931

THE MICHIGAN DAT Y4

Fill 1[| . 0 S0
FINANCIL 1MINDS
FORESEE DEFICIT
IN FEDERAL FUNDS
Delinquent Income Tax Returns,
Veterans' Demands Create
- Problem.
LEADERS AWAIT FIGURES
Smoot Estimates $500,000,000
Treasury Shortage at End
of Fiscal Year.
WASHINGTON, Mar. 18.-(P)-
Confronted with a Government in-
come outpaced by expenditures,
financial minds today cast about
for a method of shortening the
distance between the two.
The picture was presented clearly.
On March 16, the Treasury had an
actual deficit of $437,515,713. In
addition to this, there was a de-
mand from the Veterans Bureau for
$500,000,000 to meet loans on vet-
erans compensation certificates.
On the other side of the ledger
were lagging income tax receipts.
The first day's collections dropped
$5,000,000 under the first day of a
year ago, despite a one per cent
increase on ndrmal income taxes.
The report for Monday, March 16,
showed $13,100,362 as compared
with $18,148,963 for the last filing
day last year.
Await More Figures.7
This, however, was not consider-
ed by officials as indicative of the
trend the total receipts will fol-
low. Referring to the records forl
the second and third days after the
closing date last year, they pointed
to tomorrow and Friday as the days
which would give a better indica-
tion of the trend.
Chairman Reed Smoot of thes
Senate Finance Committee, whicht
handles revenue legislation for thatt
branch, expressed belief today theP
Treasury deficit would be larger
than present estimates. He esti-
mated it would be at least $500,-
000,000 at the end of the fiscalx
year, June 30.s
He said either a tax increase or a
slice in the amount put aside for
the sinking fund would be neces-
sary. He did not regard a tax in-t
crease favorably at this time.
For the present, however, theV
Treasury was busily occupied with
meeting its immediate pressing de-
mands. No plan has yet been an-a
nounced for raising the additionalu
$200,000,000 Veterans Administratore
Frank Hines has informed it willa
be necessary to care for veterans'
loans.
On Monday it sold $300,000,000 of
six months 1 per cent certificates
of indebtedness. That amount was
expected to take care of the veter-
ans' loans for three months. Hines
said $500,000,000 would be needed'
to care for the first six weeks' loans.C
Restates Estimate.
Hines said he believed his pre-
vious estimate that 75 per cent of
the veterans would apply for loans b
totaling $1,000,000,000 would bet
borne out. In the first two weeks,P
he told' the secretary, 1,372,06 ofv
the 3,500,000 veterans had filed ap
plications.
In the face of the changing situa-
tion, the Treasury quickly began
revising financing plans for the re-
mainder of the fiscal year
LIBRARY SETS UP
CARNEGIE OFFICE
Owing to the large amount of
business which has grown up as the

result of huge Carnegie grants to
college libraries, a central organ-J
ization to deal with these grants
has been set up in the University
library under the direction of Hugh
Go'urlay, 128. The office will be 1- '
cated in the present map room on
the third floor of the west book
stack.
Inquiries regarding discounts,
kinds of books to be ordered, gen-
eral policies to be adopted by the
colleges in the expenditures of these
grants will come under the consid-
eration of Gourlay. He will work
under the general supervision of,
William W. Bishop, head librarian.
Van den Broeck to Talk
at Colloquium Tonight
Results of his research in the
study of spiral springs will be pre-
sented at the applied mechanics
colloquium tonight in room 445,1
West Engineering building, by'
Prof. John A. Van den Broek, of
the engineering school.
Prof. Van den Broek has been
studying for some time, combining
analytical and experimental meth-
ods to the work.
OpW.E
AWATC H I

I
r

Mayoralty Candidate
Speaks to Democrats
Washtenaw c o u n t y Democrats
held the -second of a series of meet-
ings in the County building lastI
night in an attempt to familiarize
party members of the Democratic
platform in the biennial election to
be held April 6.

Prominent city and county can-
didates gave addresses. The princi-
pal speaker was Charles J. Hutzel,
mayoralty candidate.
A Republican rally will be held
next week, party officers announc-
ed yesterday. At a recent meeting
of the party, William M. Laird, at-
torney, was elected city chairman.
EXHIBITS FEATURE'1
AMERICANARTISTS
Alumni Memorial Hall Displays
Include Modern Works
From New York.
An exhibition of contemporary
American art sponsored by the Uni-1
versity division of fine arts and an
exhibit of paintings by young mod-i
erns from the Dudensing galleries
of New York City sponsored by the
Ann Arbor Art association are be-
ing shown this week in the galler-
ies of Alumni Memorial hall.
The contemporary art exhibit in-
cludes both oils and water colors as
well as 25 prints by some of the
leading artists of the present time.
The oil and water colors are all be-
ing shown in the north and south
galleries of the building while the
prints are hung in room A. The ex-
hibit, which is the fourth of the
series sent around to various uni-
versities by the College Art associa-
tion is scheduled to close Sunday,
March 22.
The Ann Arbor Art association's
exhibit is located in the west gal-
lery of the building and includes
paintings of some of the young
students of the New York school.
The works of this latter exhibit are
in the main modernistic and' are
put on display to illustrate the
trend of modern art, stated officials
of the organization. This exhibit
will run till the end of the month.
The galleries for tne contempor-
ary art exhibit are open from 9
until 5 o'clock daily while the other
exhibition is on view between 1:30
and 5 o'clock in the afternoons.
GLEE CLUBS PLAN
TO HOLD " DANCE

DISEASE SPREADS
iIN ALASKAN TOWN
Fight With Diphtheria Epidemic
Retarded by Lack of Food,
Hospital Supplies.
POINT BARROW, Alaska, Mar. 18
-(P)-The fight against diphtheria
raging here the last two weeks has
suffered a setback with the dis-
covery of twonew serioushcases,
the natives restless under quaran-
tine and food and hospital supplies,
shrinking fast.
All available hospital space was
filled today and Dr. Henry Griest
was compelled to return to homes
all cases showing the slightest im-
provement. This situation resulted
in the serious relapse of one pa-
tient.
The financial depression caused
a 50 per cent cut in aprpopriations
to the Presbyterian hospital here.
Dr. Griest said, resulting in a short-
age of food and supplies.
Kentucky Farmer Asks
for $100 Federal Loan
- WASHINGTON, Mar. 18.-()P)-A
Kentucky farmer needing cash to
make his next crop would like to
borrow $100 from President Hoo-
ver.
In a letter to the president he of-
fered a lumber stand of 200 pine;
and popular trees "and three times
that amount in ash," as security, so
he can "make my family something
to live on."

DRY 1LEADER SEES
SUCCESSFUL 0DRI
Woodcock Declares Governmern
Will Stamp Out Commercial
Liquor Violators.
WASHINGTON, Mar. 28. -(P)-
Amos W. W. Woodcock, Federal pro
hibition director, expressed the be
lief today that the governmen-
would be successful in the renewer
campaign to stamp out large com
mercial violators. The campaign
will begin soon with the increase
force provided by Congress.
He voiced his optimism just be-
fore he left today for a tour of in-
spection into Kentucky, Missouri
Kansas, and probably Oklahoma
and Arkansas, which is preparatory
to the new drive to open July 1 with
the 500 additional agents.
Under Woodcock the enforcement
campaign has changed its approach
He began with the premise that it
is impossible and useless for the
Government to bother with small
cases, minor infractions by the in-
dividual citizen. He mapped out a
campaign restricted to elimination
of the large sources of supply.
His reorganizations of the prohi-
bition forces has been on this basis.
For nine months he has been work-
ing. He awaits the test confidently.
Asked today what he thought of
the prospects, he said:
"I think we will be successful
against the commercial violators.
The bureau is improving in efficien-
cy and morals. You can't go into
the homes. You can't go into hip-
pockets."

DIRECTOR OF APPOINTMENT BUREAU
SAYS STUDENTS SLOW TO REGISTER
* Purdom Commends Faculty Aid son for early student enrollment
in Work; Claims Bureau the fact that re-enrollment coming
Lacks Information. from alumni already in the field
it who were desirous of new positions,
The characteristic procrastina- were pouring into the bureau at the
tion of stndents who desire posi- Irate of about ten a day. This ma-
tions after graduation, yet who do terially cuts down the student's
not take the trouble to register with caancs of scuin a position. It
- and present their c edentials to the vas mentioned th atny student
- University bureau of appointments could register with the bureau free
- and occupational information until of charge, except in the case of
a short time before graduation, was those seeking teaching positions,
- deplored by Dr. T. Luther Purdom, where a one dollar registration fee
- directcr of that organization, in an is charged after Nov. 15.
d interview yesterday. "In order to benefit those who
"Although the faculty has cooper- have already signed up with us,"
- ated with us mavelously," Dr. Pur- Dr. Purdom concluded, "the bur-
- dom declared, "students seeking eau has generally adopted the pol-
employment from this agency have icy of not publishing in newspapers
not taken the matter seriously notices of positions, giving first
enough. They delay in supplying us consideration to those about whom
with information about themselves, we already have information."
so that a last-minute pre-gradua-
t tion rush is brought about.
Especially in times of depression
t the recruiting officers of large con-
cerns seek to pick their new em-
ployes early in order to get the
pick of the field. Lack of informa-
tion concerning an applicant only
puts him at a disadvantage. Two
valuable positions were lost during " e -
the last week, because of this very
reason."
Dr. Purdom cited as another rea- When it comes to
"zero hour. If it is a
IFAMOUSARCHITECT ter, a Jacquette or Sc
now".or we sell furs ]
time duringour26yea
Irving Pond, Designer of Union, Lowest price now
League, to Deliver First which you well knc
SF r apromptly by experts.
Irving K. Pond, internationally-
known Chicago architect and ex-
president of the American Institute C
of Architecture will deliver the first
of the series of four lectures on ' call o
04eW~y as wie c
architlecture a a C' o, e :ay
in the auditorium of the Archi-
tectural building. The subject of Liberalaowance
the talk is "Laying the Foundations o
of Architecture."
In the lecture Pond, who is the at moderate price.
designer of the Union, League, and
the new Press building as well as
numerous famous skyscrapers inw,
Chicago, Detroit, and New York,
will discuss what architecture has 9
meant in the ages. 1904
Tomorrow at the same time and
place, Ford will deliver the second j
lecture of the series, "Possibilities
in American Expression," a discus- _ _.----__-_____
sion of the new trend in American ---- -
architecture. To both of the talks,
the public as well as students and
faculty members of all schools are
invited.
Freshmen Defended.
UNIVERSITY OF D E N V E R-
Freshmen may grow mustaches
without fear of upperclassmen. The
attorney general of Colorado has
warned the older men that they
are open to persecution for assault
and battery for shaving off fresh-
men "cookiedusters."

If,

i- ---

f

News

From Other Collees

IlI

I'__________________a_________

FLUNKERS ARE FETED.
COE COLLEGE -.Students here
are planning a large ball, the an-
nual "Flunkers Frolic," in honor of
the members who have flunked out
the first semester. The chairman
and queen are picked from those
who have not passed a course while
in college.
BOLTS AID STUDENT MARKS
WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY - Al-
though unlimited cuts were allowed
in all major courses this year, the
present upper classmen have made
better grades than did last year's
juniors or seniors.
STUDENTS NOTED UNPOPULAR.
C O L U MB I A UNIVERSITY-A,
questionnaire conducted by the
Columbia "Spectator" ievealed that
New Yorkers do not like college
students. Five out of every six
questioned believed them to be lazy.
COLLEGIATE FOOTBALL
DEBATED.
JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
-Arguing that the U n i v e r s i t y
should not abolish intercollegiate
football, the freshman class debat-
ers recently defeated the sopho-
more team at one of the weekly
assemblies.

CO-EDS MAKE PROTEST.
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO.--
Women of the University of Chi-s
cago were so infuriated by a "Co-
ed's Diary" which appeared in the
last issue of the Chicago Phoenix,
that they have refused to subscribe
to the magazine.
MANY FAIL IN CHICAGO.
UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO -
One-fourth of the freshman class
in the department of mathematics
failed the course last semester.
Nearly as many more withdrew..
Members of the faculty gave poor
preparation in high school and the
inability of students to apply them-
selves as the chief reasons for the
large percentage of failures.
WOMEN ONCE SEGREGATED.
UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS--When
the legislature of 1864 passed an
act providing for the University of
Kansas, one of the specific provi-
sions was that there should be two
branches of the University, a re-
port reveals, a men's and women's
branch. The buildings of the men's
branch were to be entirely sep-
arate from the buildings of the wo-
men's branch.

A joint dance by the Men's and
Women's. Glee clubs will be held
Saturday, March 28, at the Delta.
Gamma sorority house, Gayle Chaf-
fn, '31SM, manager of the men's
organization, announced yesterday.
The event will be a "stag" for
both organizations and will give
the members of each club an op-
portunity to become acquainted;
with one another.

I
S.
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. ,-z
THE NEWS CARRIER OF 1870

f1

(No Admission Charge)

SCHOOL OF MUSIC CONCERTS

HANNS PICK
Violoncellist, and
ALICE MANDERBACH
Accompanist
Sun., March 22, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
WASSILY BESEKIRSKY
Violinist, and
MABEL ROSS RHEAD
Pianist, in Sonata Recital
Sun., March 29, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
JOSEPH BRINKMAN
Pianist
Sun., April 5, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
THELMA NEWELL
Violonist, and
LOUISE NELSON
Pianist in Sonata Recital
Sun., April 26, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
SCHOOL OF MUSIC TRI

I

IN A SWIRL OF DusT the pony
express arrived! Carrier of the
news in 1870! Messages from the
East, news of ships just docked
from foreign ports, dispatches of
local importance, were contained in
the sack the rider carried.
OVER WIRES AND CABLES and
through the air Associated Press
dispatches are sent to the various
parts of the country and abroad-
today. The (Newspaper) receives
these A. P. messages daily. Keep
yourself posted on' the accurate, up-
to-the-minute news of

I

Wassily Besekirsky
Violinist
Joseph Brinkman

Hanns Pick
Violincellist

C, 4r Assarlatrb Frrss

I ianist

I i

It

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