100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 19, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCII 19, 1

A R D E N A B A N N R S N B f I G OD O N Sb
IISOHERS' OFFER
JR GOCODT

- ___.

BENNETT DENIES
ONE-MAN CHARGE

t Prison Inmates Seek
Trade With Hill for
Mild Treatment.

to

DOCK RIOT CAUSES|President of Columbia
Attacks Dry Statute
IIE fl i RESS PASADENA, Calif., Mar.'13-(ou
of Columbia University, attacked
prohibition here Tuesday night be-
New Orleans Longshoremen Fire fore a group including Bishop
on Police in Water James Cannon, Jr., of the Metho-
Front Strike. dist Episcopal Church, south, a pro-
hibitionist.
The occasion was an organization
NEW ORLEANS, Mar. 18. - I- meeting of the Crusaders, who de-
Negro longshoremen, on s t r i k e sire to elect a wet President in 1932.
along the New Orleans water front, Dr. Butler decried the Eighteenth
fired on policemen today during a Amendment as an infringement of
riot in which 150 arrests were made, personal liberty and said if the
trend it represented were carried to
None was reported wounded by its logical conclusion, California
bullets but several persons received "would be reduced to the status of
minor injuries in the clash. a modern county."
Those arrested were charged with I
offenses ranging from loitering and
[distuibing the peace to carryingt
concealed weapons and violating a l
federal injunction against disorder- L lctenI i i
ly conduct ini the strike. Weapons~ f IiifY
were taken from a score of the

JARD FREED BY JURY

ill Run Prison Without
of Prisoners, Hill
Declares.

Aid

- --

JOLIET, Ill., Mar. 18.-()-War-
den Henry C. Hill of the state pen-
itentiary, scene of the recurrent
disorders since Saturday, today em-
phatically rejected an informal of-
fer of prisoners to restore good be-.
havior in return for milder treat-
i.ll said he would -lock up the
first man who presented such a pe-
ttion into "solitary" and keep him
there. indefinitely on bread and
water.
Jury Investigates.
"I intend to run this prison with-
out any help from prisoners," he
declared.
Deports of the demand for "home
rule," came to the warden as ar
atexmath of a crqwded day. While
a coroner's jury conducted an in-
vestigation into the deaths of two
convicts-two of the three wounded
during the Saturday riot-disturb-
ances broke out in both the old
prison and the new penitentiary at
Statevile.
Yarbeck Exonerated.
The coroner's jury exonerated
Guard Frank Cutchin for firing the
bulrlets which proved fatal for Con-
victs Albert Yarbeck and George
Jakowans, but their verdict was1
not returned until after Yarbeck's
sister, Irene, attacked Cutchin,
scratched his face, and screamed
"murderer" at him and Warden
Hill.
The disturbance in the new pris-
on began when 20 convict-members
of the band debated whether to
start a prison-wide iot.
FU N A 1
Autopsy Reveals John Ballard,
Dental Student, Took
His Own Life.
Funeral services for John W.
Ballard, '33D, who, an autopsy dis-
closed, committed suicide by taking
prison, were held yesterday after-,
noon at the Dolph funeral home,
Maynard street.
The services, which were private,
were in charge of Rev. Frederick
Cowin, of the Church of Christ
Disciples. Interment was in Forest
Hill cemetery.
.Ballard, who was 28 years old,
ws a son of Mrs. Rose L. Ballard,
of 516 Walnut street. He died sud-
denly Monday night while visiting
at the home of a friend.
Suicide was given as the reason
for Ba lard's death following an
autopsy made in the pathological
laboratories of the University.
- E
4~3 QUR
It is your
v.' taxi in the cities
+ ~ and an open sesame
to country roads and towns
where old customs linger
and people are friendly ... it
is an invitation to mountains and
valleys and the secrets of undis-
covered Europe .. . Best of all a car
is not a luxury . . . we have cars to
drive -yourself from $5 a day onTa
monthly basis... Reserve a car NOW
for your trip abroad and make your sum-
iter a success ... We arrange all details
..a. .Write us or see your local agent.

f

R. B. Bennett,
Prime Minister of Canada, who
recently denied the assertion by his
predecessor in office, W. L. Mac-
kenzie King, that the Bennett gov-
ernment was a one-man govern-
ment. He charged Russian entrance
into the world markets was the
cause of the present low prices of
Canadian wheat.
DRHIVER TO ANSWER
C*5HRGSMARCH 23
Ora Jermey, Accident Principal,
to be Accused of Driving
While Drunk.
Released yesterday on $500 bond
in the court of Justice Jay H.
Payne, Ora Jermey, R. R. No. 3, is
to appear March 23 to answer a
charge of driving drunk, as the re-
sult of an accident Tuesday night
in which police said four cars were
involved, and one man injured.
According to officers, Jermey,
who is a mechanic at Yahr broth-
ers' service station, was driving
east on Huron avenue at 9:451
o'clock Tuesday night, when his
car collided with one driven by J. S.
Tomlinson, 732 Spring s t r e e t,
who was also going east on Huron
avenue.
The force of the collision caused
Tomlinson's vehicle :.o crash into a
Par owned by Carl ochwemming,
823 Spring street, which was parked
at the curb, he told police,
Ruth Nichols Equais
Hawks'Flight Reco. ci
WASHINGTON, March 18.-(>)-
Miss Ruth Nichols, society aviatrix,
today equaled the unofficial rec-
ord between New York and Wash-
ington set by Capt. Frank Hawks
with a flight from Jersey City Air-
port to the Anacostia naval air
station in one hour and five min-
utes.

prisoners.
Police said the Negroes, part of
the group of river front workers
which went on strike about a month
ago in protest against a wage cut
of 15 cents an hour by four steam-
ship companies, met after midnight
it a hall and formed a marching
body of about 200 which headed
for the river. Officers said the
marchers intended to intimidate
strike-breakers.
Arriving at the docks shortly be-
fore dawn, the marchers were met
by the police who ordered the
crowd to disperse. Retreating to
neighboring streets, the Negroes
broke up into small groups, hissing
and booing the police. Snipers at
strategic points then opened fire
on the officers, and the officers,
withholding fire, rushed into the
crowd to make arrests, disarming
several members of the mob and
rounding up the small groups.
What's
Goingj
On
THEATRES
Majestic-Jeanette MacDonald in
"Lottery Bride" with Joe E. Brown
and Zasu Pitts.
Wuerth-"Only the Brave" with
Gray Cooper and Mary Brian.
Michigan-Leon Errol in "Only
Saps Work" with Stuart Erwin and
Mary Brian.
Lydia Mendelssohn-Junior Girls'
Play "Came the Dawn!;" 8:30
o'clock.
GENERAL
Lecture--Alexander Miller on the
erection of the Manhattan building,
New York; 7:15 o'clock, Natural
Science auditorium.
Lecture-Prof. Edward G. Conk-
lin on "Fitness, the Greatest Prob-
lem of Biology;" 4:15 o'clock, Na-
tural Science auditorium.
University Lecture-Dr. S. E.
I 5 D" ard on "Chemistry in Flat-
lane. - 1:15 o'clock, room 303, Chem-
istry .lding.
Applied Mechanics Colloquium-
Prof. J. A. Van den Broek on "Ana-
lysis of Spiral Springs;" 7:30 o'clock,
room 445, West Engineering build-
ing.

Liii UIHIIUU I:UJJHI
Prominent Members of Faculty,
Students, AlumniWrite
in March Issue.:
Prominent alumni, students, and
faculty members have contributed
articles to the March issue of the
Michigan Technic, student publica-
tion of the engineering and archi-
tecture schools, which will be dis-
tributed in the halls of the East
Engineering building today.
Leading the articles in the cur-1
rent number is "Aerial Photogra-
phic Mapping," by Cedric S. Wood,
'26E. Wood tells of some of the re-
cent developments in this field and
points out several of the possible
uses to which -they may be put in
the future.
Prof. Walter C. Sadler, of the
railroad engineering department,
writes in this issue on "The Law of
Eminent Domain," and tells of
some of the cases which have arisen
under the statutes. Particular at-
tention is given to a definition of
the terms over which argument has
come up in the past.
"Modern Metal Art in Architet;.
ture," by Lyle F. Zisler, '32A, des-
cribes the use of 'metal work es-
pecially for decorative purposes as
a "premier contribution to, a newv
style." College Notes is dedicated
this month to Prof. Walter L. Bad-
ger, of the chemical engineering
department.

H|UT H(
MILL TX_[TION
(Continued from Page 1)
will makeshift somehow with the
present equipment."
Dr. Ruthven then went into the
second issue, even more "vital than
the first." The issue includes a pro-
posal to reduce the Mill tax below
its present amount and to replace
it now-and of course in the fu-
ture also-with an appropriation
made by the legislature.
"Specifically, a bill which has
come to the house limits the pro-
ceeds of the Mill tax to about $4,-
500,000 for the next biennium, a
reduction of $420,000 below the
amount now being received under
the Mill tax law, $4,920,000. More
serious than the actual reduction
in dollars and cents is the nullifi-
cation of the principle of the Mill
tax and the substitution of the
method of specific biennial appro-
priation. If this becomes a law, it
will disable the University of Mich-
igan and make it, not temporarily,
but for a long time to come, an
inferior institution. Reduction of
operating income by more than
$400,000 will in the first place create
an emergency which can only be
met by drastically curtailing the
work of the University. We shall
have to reduce professors' salaries,
too low already, dismiss men from
the faculty, reduce the number of
students through the closing of a
college or the omission of a whole
class, either one, several, or all
of these expedients will have to be
adopted."
President Ruthven then pointed
out how disastrous this change in
the actual machinery of the Uni-
versity would be and how the qual-
ity of the institution would be
affected. He stressed the fact that
the Mill tax law provides a stable
income for the University, and that
it takes the re:ns from the hands
of politics and permits the institu-
tion to have a natural, unbroken
growth. To attempt to engage pro-
fessors on a two-year basis, as
would be necessary under the new
system, would lower the quality of
the faculty at the University be-
yond repair.. The key men would
drift away, said Dr. Ruthven, to
institutions where private endow-
ment would insure long-term con-
tracts at godd salaries.

Matthews to Appear With Grace
George in First
Mrs. Frazer.'
A. E. Matthews, who plays oppo-
site Grace George in "The First
Mrs. Fraser," which will be pre-
sented Monday afternoon and eve-
ning in the Lydia Mendelssohn
theatre. has laved in manvn arts i

i

all over the world in his stage Fellowship Awarded
career. He has toured Australia and
South Africa in the days when for Academy at Rome
distance was conquered by the stage
coach. NEW YORK, March 18.-(/)-
In London, he has been seen in 'Award of fellowships in classical
Drury Lane, with Ellen Terry, studies at the American Academy
Marion Terry, Sir Charles Wynd- in Rome was announced today to
man, Sir John Hare, and Sir Arthur Frank E. Brown, of Carlton College,
Bouchier. Before taking up the pro- now a gradtuate student at Yale;
fession of acting, he was appren- Alfred Gelstharp, Jr., of Amherst
ticed to a firm of wholesale book- and Princeton, and Agnes Kirsopp
sellers on Newgate st.reet opposite Lake, candidate for a Master of
the old Newgate prison. Arts degree at Bryn Mawr. The fel-
Ruth Benson Blinn, who has been lowships carry a stipend of $1,750 a
absent from the theatre for over sixyear for two years.

years, will appear in the play. The
daughter of a major, she was born
in a military post, Fort Logan, in
Montana. After acting in several
amateur dramatic societies, she
went on the stage and was first
seen in "Love of Crutches." Since
then she has played in "The Cat
and The Cherub," "It Can't be
Done," "Little Face," and others.

I

m

ACTOR HAS PLAYED WITH FAMOUS
COMPANIES IN TOURS OF WORLD

. .
r
t
1

"It 'sA

W

1931 Junior Girls' Play
Tonight Through Saturday
Matinee on Saturday
Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre
Tickets at the Box Office

NOW
SHOWING

,er'.fh

2:00-3:40
7:00-9:00

Buy a

rI

GARY COOPER
Only the
.MARY BRIAN

I

J q9YaramozmttJctiaz

,,
r

A-t

COMING SUNDAY
GEORGE "THE SEAS BENEAT H"
O'BRIEN

Fountain
Pen and

4.

Get a
Pencl to
Match
FREE!
W E have just received a big
new shipment of several
leading makes of fountain pens,
all latest models and finishes. To
the first 200 who buy a new
fountain pen, we will give a fine
a u t o m a t i c pencil, to match,
FREE! Included are Moore,
Schaeffer, Parker and Waterman
pens-a wonderful assortment.

i

I 4

i

'i{

alesIi

Daily at
2:00, 3:40, 7:00,
9:00

A New Twinplex Stropper
for Orily $1

JUST bring in your- old
Twinplex and trade it
in on one of the wonder-
fu1l new models. Your old
one and $1 gives you a
brand new Twinplex - an
unusual offer for a limited
time. If you liked your old
Twinplex, you'll, like the
new model 100% more.

c
o

218 Madison Ave., New Yoric
11 Rue Boudreau 9 3 Regent St.
Paris London
BRIGHT SPOT
8(2 PACKARD ST.
TODAY, 11:30 to 1:30
BAKED BEANS WITH
VIRGINIA BAKED HAM-
VEGETABLE SOUP
HAM SANDWICH
COTTAGE CHEESE SALAD
CUSTARD
MILK OR COFFEE
.30c
5:30 to 7:30
ROAST BEEF, HORSE RADISH

I

JC-AneTTG lALD
JOHN GAPJK YOULL
JOEE.KOVNLIKE
ROBETAT CHI.SHOLM. .
JOSEPH MACAULAY DLOERY
7AC l 1T1 g y BRIDE"

x
;;
.
,:

And Here's a Bargain for
the Shavers
How's this? A full-sized 35-cent tube of Mennen's Shaving Cream and a
25-cent can of Mennen's Talc for Men. A 60-cent value the world over,
now special at the C-F stores-
Both for Only 47c!
$10 Dunhill Lighters, $3.95
That famous lighter, as finely and carefully built as a watch. Always
work, last for years. The pioneer among lighters-and the best. Get now
at a reduction of nearly 60 per cent.
Calkins-Fletcher

III

L'- -SHORT SUJECTS !11

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan