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March 19, 1931 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-19

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ESTABLISHED
1890

ICg

EDITED AND MANVAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

MEMBERf. .
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XLL No. 120

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

THURSDAY, MARCH 19, 1931

PRICE FIVE CENTS

FIVE

BUILDINGS

.;
' /. ,. .
,'
;>
1
r

IN

PRISON

RIOTI

G

AT

JOLIE

RUTHYEN SPEAKS
TO ALMI BODY
ON TAX QUESTION
D e cl a r e s University
Is Now Practicing
Strict Economy.
BUILDINGSNEEDED
University Interests Are
Confidently Left
to Legislature.

MORE THAN 20 MEN BELIEVED LOST IN EXPLOSION
WHICH WRECKED SHIP OFF NEWFOUNDLANDCOAST

CONKLIN WILL OPEN REBELLION AT NEW STATEVILE
LECTUERORM PENITENTIARY CURHBED IN HOUR;
__CTH O i InFqR rTIMATFnDAT IQfU000

President Alexander G r a n t::
Ruthven frankly and openly dis-
cussed the present Mill tax sit-
uation before more than 125
members of the. Ann Arbor
Alumni association at a banquet
in the Union last night, stating
that the University is confidently
leaving its interests in the hands
of the legislators at Lansing, I
knowing "that they now, as in
the past,-will properly take care of
this and other state educational
institutions)'
Dr. Ruthven emphasized the fact
that the University is practicing
every possible economy under theT
present scheme of income and that The first Associated Press tele
the Mill tax is essential to its ex- day night by an explosion off thel
istence as an important university. thought to have lost their lives. T
That there was no controversy be- tragedy, one of the major marine a
tween the legislature and the Uni- rooned. The cause of the blast, wi
versity existing at the present time and the supply of blasting powder t
was made clear by the President. and film director (inset) was aboar
Local Taxes Heavy.
Dr. Ruthven went on to show
how the huge-tax bill is not due
to the legislation but to local as-
remedt adt he oeation of T VJR C VI IVS
cities and towns. throughout thet
state. If.the entire state tax were5
removed and the operation of all
state enterprises and offices ceased_
the tax burden would be reduced Number of Dead and Missing
but one dollar out of each nine now
paid. Not Determined; Houses
"There are today two issues be- for Injured Erected.
fore the legislature in which the
University is involved. The first is ST. JOHN'S, Newfoundland, Mar.
a question of bill appropriations 18.-P)-Relief for ,ie survivors'
In 1929, Representative Gus T. and a cieck to determine the exact
Hartman introduced a bill, which
was passed, to make appropriations number of dead or missing consti-
over two bienniums, 1929-1931 and tuted a task today for rescue ships
1931-1933, for buildings at various lying off Horse island, near which
state institutions; $700,000 wasa
thereby appropriated for lands and an explosion burned and sank the
buildings at the University in 1931- sealer Viking.
32, and $700,000 more in 1932-33. Lack of exact infcrmation re-'
Some time ago the Regents decided garding the number of persong a-I
that they would make no further i
requests for building funds beyond board the 50-year-old sealing :ship
what was already included, and when a blast tore out her stern
apparently appropriated, in the Sunday night and conflicting re-{
Hartman act. It is now possible ports on the number who had made
that the Hartman act will be modi- their way across eight miles of ice
fled in some way by the present floes to the island left the number
legislature. If not entirely repealed, unaccounted for:in doubt. Officials
the appropriations which it carries said they believed the final' check
may be postponed. In view of the would show approximately 20 in
necessity for economy in state the death list.
affairs, the Regents have decided Between 118 and 124 survivors
to acquiesce to this also, in order were huddled on Horse island mak-
to give their fullest cooperation to ing the best of the. meager facili-
the state government in thebsolu- ties and waiting for the rescue
tion of difficult financial problems. ships, S a g o n a and Foundation
Need Buildings. Franklin, with doctors, nurses and
UThis does not mneed buildins food supplies, to take them off.
We should havenan administration
building at once to rid ourselves of 'Ensian Sale Postponed
the fire menace of old University Because of Weather
hall; we are morally committed to
build a new observatory to replace Adverse weather conditions have
the old one, now hardly usable be-c
cause of the handicap of city lights, caused the postponement of the
smoke, and earth vibrations; and final all-campus sale of Michigan-
we should add to the engineering ensians which was to be today, it
building to permit that college to was announced last night by George
do even its normal, work properly. E. Hofmeister, '31, business man-
But if no expansion is possible weagrothyebok
(Continued on Page 2) ager of the yearbook.
a_ --- The sale with the provisions an- I

.-.. -- - --< - diAssociatedPress Photo
photo picture of the sealing steamer Viking which was torn apart Sun-
Newfoundland coast shows the vessel on which more than 20 men are
wo relief vessels carrying medical aid and food...to the survivors of the
accidents in recent years, reached the island where the men were ma-
hich tore off the stern of the vessel, 'was still undetermined. The boiler
n board were given as possible causes. Varick Frissel, New York explorer
rd.

NOR THWESTERN, WISCONSIN TO MEET
VAPSIT Y DEBA TERS 2iNi'AMA TEUR!SMi'
Affirmative Team Will Engage afive tetm includes Lawrence Hart-1
Wisconsin Tonight in wig, '31, Victor Rabinowitz, '31, and
Nathan Levy, '31. All these men are
Hill Auditorium. experienced, having represented the
U rUiverscith i rne.-

I
i
I
{
I
4

tMaichigan's Varsity d e b a t i n g
teams will ineet Wisconsin and
Northwestern tonight in the con-
ference debates
for the second se-
mester. The Wis-
consin contest will
be held at 8 o'-
clock in Hill au-
ditorium, and that
with Northwest-
ern will be "at
.;Evanston.
The affirmative
mal squad d ebates at
hKme. It is com-
Kimball posed of John W
Lederle '33, Leonard L. Kimball '33
and Howard Simon, '32L.- The neg-
COUNCIL SEL E C TS
NEW COM M i I T TEES'0
Definite Reorganization Attempt
Made by Student Government
Body at Meeting.
Definite attempts along reorgan-
ization lines and the appointment
of a committee to outline all pos-
sible work for the rest of the semes-
ter, featured the meeting of the
Student council last night. Two
other committees were also named
by Vice-President Richard A. Fur-
niss, '31E.
Five councilmen will compose the
newly appointed auditing commit-
tee of the council, which will in-
vestigate and pass on all financial
matters pertaining to class dances.
Those selected are: H. B. Palmer,
'31, Merton X. Bell, '31, Furniss,
Edward J. McCormick, '32, and J.
Nail Candler, '32E.
A booklet listing all the organ-
izations on the campus and a treat-
ment of the functions and purposes
of each, will be published and dis-
tributed aroundthe campus by a
committee under the direction of
H. B. Palmer. Other councilmen
selected to assist in the editing of
the booklet are: J. Harrison Sim-
rall, '31, Albert J. Donahue, '31, Al-
fred J. Palmer, '32, and John
Denler, '32.

Viou y conerenC

i

vious conference
and non-confer-
{ ence debates.
The proposition{
for debate is the
o n e selected by
the Western Con-
ference Debating
league for the
second semester,
'Resolved: that,
all colleges a n d'
Simon u niversities
should abolish the distinction be-
tween amateurism and profession-,
alism in sports to which admission j
fees are. charged."
Prof. Preston H. Scott, College of
the City of Detroit, will act as sin-
gle critic judge for the Wisconsin
debate.
Prof. Louis Eich, of the speech
-department, will
preside. The {
N o r t h w e s t err
contest is being
judged by Prof
Rexford Mitchell <
Lawrence college }
Wis.
Wisconsin will
be represented by
Theophil Kamm Lederle
holz, Otto S. Zerwick, and Aaron
Levine.
MURP HY TO SPAK
AT MASSMEETING
Hill Auditorium to be Scene of
Mass Gathering on Subject
of Unemployment.,
To educate the community to thef
problem of unemployment especial-
ly in its larger aspects, as well as
to consider certain remedies for the
present situation, a mass meeting
will be held at 7:30 o'clock tomor-
row night in Hill auditorium under
the auspices of Ann Arbor minis-
ters.
Three prominent speakers have
been obtained for the occasion by
H. P. Marley, pastor of the Unitar-
ian church, who is making general

Will Give Address on Fitness,
the Greatest Problem
of Biology.'
FORESTERS WILL MEET
Exhibit in Newberry Hall Will
Open Tonight; Reception
Will Follow It.
Prof. Edwin G. Conklin, of the
biology department of Princeton
university, will deliver the first
general lecture on the Michigan
Academy of Science program at
4:15 o'clock this afternoon in the
Natural Science auditorium. He
will speak on "Fitness, The Great-
est Problem of Biology."
The forestry section will be the
only single group to meet today. At
9 o'clock it will meet in room 2039,
Natural Science building, and sev-
eral papers will be given. Among
these will be "Some Essentials in a
Michigan Reforestation Policy," by
John C. DeKamp, of Michigan State
college, and "Forestry for Park,
Highway and Scenic Development,"
by Phelps Vogelsang, of the state
department.
Mitchell to Speak.
The morning meeting, which is
open to the general public, as will
be all the following section meet-
ings, will be followed by a luncheon,1
and another meeting at 2 o'clock.
Among the papers which will be
given at this time are "Forest Fire
Research. in the Lake States," by
J. A. Mitchell, of the Lake States
Forest experiment station; "Appli-1
cation of Research Data in Forest
Fire Prevention and Control," byI
G. L. Stewart, of the Michigan de-
partment of conservation; and "Re-I
sults of Thinning in White Pine,"
by Prof. L. J. Young, of the fores-
try school.
At 8 o'clock tonight in Newberry
hall, the annual exhibit, one of
classical archaeology, is planned.
The exhibit will be followed by aE
reception for members of the aca-
demy and their guests. Further
section meetings will be held on l
Friday and. Saturday.
Many Sciences Represented.
The Michigan Academy of Sci-
ence, Arts, and Letters is officially1
affiliated with the American As-
sociation for the Advancement of
Science.
GRIDIRON BANQUET:
TO FEATURE SKITS,
Sigma Delta Chi's Ninth Annual,
Affair Will be Held in
Union April 8.
Sigma Delta Chi's ninth annual'
Gridiron banquet, to be held April'
8 at the Union, will feature a series
of skits and an all-campus movie
on the "University's Ban System,"
chairman Joseph Russell, '31, sports
edi'lr of The Daily, announced yes-
terday afternoon. Invitations to
the banquet will be sent out today
by Harold O. Warren, Jr., '31, and
are in the form of proof sheets
telling the story of the famous Oil
Can and the possibilities of this
year's presentation.
Tickets for the banquet have been
placed on sale at $2.50 this year for
the first time, a price of $3 having
been charged annually since the in-
stallation of the function nine
years ago. It is understood that the
theme of the banquet will be con-
cerned with the "ban" system, the
recent liquor raids, and other cam-
pus events.
The presentation of the famed
IOil Can will be the feature of the

banquet, as in the past. Originally,
the trophy was given to the man
whose prominence on the campus
during the 12 months past war-
ranted "razzing" by the student
body, the faculty, and the city at
large. Last year, however, Waldo
Abbot, of the English department,

LULJIJLU LIJI l11I LU ll I UUU9,UU~U

Regent's Old School
Provides Wood Gavel,
Because Regent Junius E. Beal
wanted to commemmorate his
bannister-sliding days, Alpha Nu
has a new gavel made of black
walnut wood. The Regent was a
member of the forensic society
during his undergraduate days
at the University.
The materials for the gavel
from one of the old ward school
bannisters, which Regent Beal
used to slide down during his
grade-school career. He obtained
the wood when the school, which
stood on the present site of
Betsey Barbour residence, was
torn down.
It was made into a gavel by
the B. and G. boys, and finished
with a nice brown stain.
ALLEN NAMED HEAD
OF STATECOUNCIL
Conservation Society Adopts
Resolution Protesting
Budget Cuts.
Prof. Shirley W. Allen, of the
forestry department, was yesterday
elected president of the Michigan
Conservation council, which met
during the day at the Union. Harry
B. Black, of Flint, was named sec-
retary of the council.
A resolution protesting cuts in
the state's budget for certain divi-
sions of the conservation depart-
ment was adopted after an extend-
ed discussion. A resolution favor-
ing the passage of the Rushton
Commercial forest reserve act was
passed after discussions by George
P. McCallum, of Ann Arbor, and
Prof. Don Matthews, of the fores-
try department.
Other, resolutions, recommending
the formation of a state water code
and advocating grants of tax relief
for the practise of forestry on pri-
vately owned timber lands, were
adopted.
Adoption of resolutions favoring
a law which would take care of the
establishment of community forests
and the continuation of aerial sur-
veys of the state were other feat-
ures of the meeting.
Prof. K. C. McMurray, of the for-
estry department, spoke on the sit-
uation in Wilderness park, locat-
ed in Emmett county, and after a
discussion the council passed a res-
olution opposing the construction
of a road into the park, as recently1
approved by the Conservation de-
partment, on the grounds that it
would ruin the wild character of
the place.
The executive committee, selected
for the succeeding year, includes:
C. W. Tuller, of Detroit; George E.
Bishop, of Marquette; Arthur W.
Stace, of Ann Arbor; Harry Har-
per, of Lansing; and George Mc-
Callum, of Ann Arbor.
U. S. Will Not Engage
in Armament Question
LONDON, Mar. 18. -(P)- T h e
United States policy of aloofness
from purely European armament
problems has been adhered to in a
decision made public tonight at the
conclusion of two days of conver-
sation between Arthur Henderson,
British foreign minister; J. V. Alex-
ander, First Lord of the Admiralty;
U. S. Senator Dwight W. Morrow
and Ambassador Charles G. Dawes.

Five Workers Feared
Suffocated in Cave-in
SAN FRANCISCO, Mar. 18.-(IP)

Revolt Quelled Before
Arrival of State
Militiamen.
ESCAPESGUARDED
Second Major Uprising
of Week Starts in
Chair Factory.
JOLIET, Mar. x8.-)-lain-
ing riots held sway in the new
Stateville penitentiary for one
mad hour today.
The short-lived mutiny by 1,0oo
howling convicts, the volcanic
climax to a week of stifled rebel-
lion, ended with five buildings
prey to fire and three mutineers
wounded. Damage was estimated
at $300,000.
The cowed remainder were
safely in their cells when the first
company of state militia marched
through the prison gate at 3:20 p. m.
Starts in Chair Factory.
Surging into a furious start in
the prison chair factory, the revolt
spread until nearly every convict
out of his cell had joined to widen
destruction.
Before 3 p. m., Warden Henry C.
Hill and prison guards had sub-
dued the rioters and at 3:30 fire-
men from Joliet had curbed the
licking flames.
Outside- the wals;-'the cordon of
aighway patrolmen .and city ,po~lee
kept guard against escapes, and a
curried count of prisoners showed
3ll were safely inside.
Second in Week.
The second major uprising in a
week, amplified duplication of a
rebellion at the old state prison
zcross the town, had its inception
imong 180 convicts in the chair
.actory.
As if by prearrangement they left
;heir machinery, pounced on three
guards, lit torches of inflammable
material and rushed howling into
-he yard.
From adjoining structures con-
victs poured out, seized torches and
applied them quickly to the laun-
dry, the shoe and carpenter shop,
,he garage and the dining hall'.
Then, almost hidden in the bil-
'owing smoke, they gathered in the
open yard.
Three Men Shot.
Caught up in the turmoil, Rev.
Eligius Weir, Catholic chaplain,
;leaded for a respite. The convicts
answered him with hoots and cries
of "We want a new parole board!
Jhange the parole board!"
The guards fired low into the
mass of elbowing men. Other
guards exploded tear gas bombs,
nd as the acrid fumes spread, the
:onvicts hastened: to their cells.
' henthe prison gates were, opened
o admit the Joliet fire department
'OFFICIALS SETTL
DRINKINGCHARGES
Minnesota Students Reinstated
With Provisions for
Extra Work.
ST.. PAUL, Mar. 18.--(P)-Uni-
versity of Minnesota farm school
officials today settled the recent
liquor drinking incident on the
campus which brought disciplinary
action against 17 students. The
settlement apparently was satis-
factory to all involved.
Dean W. C. Coffey ruled that ad-
ditional school work will be requir-
ed of 13 suspended students before

they receive diplomas, two must
return to school for another term,
and thee xpulsion of two others,
for bootlegging, stands. The 13 may
perform the required school work
Airirn" +h cmm, Pihnh+ uam

state Bulletin's
(By Associated Press)
Wednesday, March 18, 1931
PONTIAC-The Peoples S t a t e
Trust and Savings bank here closed
its doors today as the state banking
department took over its . books
preparatory to the bank's liquida-
tion. R. E. Reichert, state .banking
commissioner, with the approval of
the directors, ordered the bank's
li,r af-

nounced has been tentatively set
for the first week in April, Hof-
meister said. At that time, the
pledge stubs will be redeemed for
50 cents and will be voided after
the sale. Only 240 books remain to
be sold..
Socialist Publication
to Appear on Monday
"The Socialist Student," a new
bi-weekly newspaper to be issued
by the Michigan Socialist club, was
announced last night. The first

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