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June 01, 1930 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-06-01

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAIEY

SUTNDAY, JUNE 1, 198.

7: r L ,-,7 Z

- - - __ - - 1 _ - ..... a r.

Publiaed every morning exeet Monday t
tuing the ~niversity ear by the Board inh
Contl of Studen Publication.
Member of Western Conference Editorialh
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis- zl
patches credited to it or not otherwise gredited
n this paper and the local news publishedf
herein.
4 Intered at the postoffice at An Arbor,p
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
mater General.a
Subscription by carrier, $4.oe; by masl,
6dfices: Ann Arbor Press Building. May-
Hard Street. t
Phones: Editorial, 4925: Business, 21a14.
EDITORIAL STAFF,
Telephone 4925x
MANAGING EDITOR i
ELLIS B. MERRYY
Editorial Chairman.........George C. Tlley
City Editor................Pierce Rosenberg
News Editor...............Donald J. Kline
Sports Editor........Edwar L. Warner, Jr.a
Women's Editor......... .Marjorie ollmer
Telegraph Editor.......Cassam A. Wilson
Music and Dama...... William JLGorman
Literary Ftitor.......Lawrence R. Klein
Assistant City Fditor.... Robert J. Feldmanl
Night Fitors-Editorial Board Members1
Frank E. Cooper flenry J. Merry
William C. (entry Robert L. Sloss
Charles k1. 'iauffman Walter W. Wild
Gurney Williams
Reporters
Morris Alexander. Bruce JM anley
Bertram Askwitp Lester May
Helen Barc Margaret Mix
Maxwell Bauer David M. Nicol 1
Mary L. Behymer William Page
Allan H. Berkman Howard H. Peckham
Arthr J.Bernstein Hugh Pierce Vco
Artur' Victor Rabinowita
S. %each Conger Jh .Raeindel
Tkdmas M. Cooley Jeannie Roberts
Helen Domine Joseph A. Russeli
Margaret Eckels Joseph Rwitch
Catherine Ferrin Ialph R. Sach
Carl F. Forsythe Cecelia Shrive
Sheldon C. Fullerton Charles R. Sprow
Ruth Gallmeyer Adsit StewartI
Ruth ueddes S. Cadwell Swanso
Ginevri. Ginn Jane Thayer
ack Goldsmith Margaret Thompon
Emily Grimes Richard L. Tobin
Morris Gr overma Robert Townsend
Mfararet Harris Elizabeth Valentine
Culen Kennedy Harold 0. Warren, Jr.
tean Levy G. 1Lionel Wie
Ruasell E. McCracken Barbara Wright
Dorothy Magee Vivian Ziist
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
A. J. JORDAN, JR.
Assistant Manager
ALEX K. SCHERER
Department Managers I
Advertising............. T. Hollister Mabley
Advertising ........... Kasper H. Halverson
Service ............George A. 'Sater
Circulation,... .............. J. Vernor Davis
Accounts....... .....John R. Rose
Pblications... ..... George R. Hamilton
Business Secretary--Mary Chase
Assistana
ames E. Cartwright Thomas Muir
obert Crawford George R. Patterson
Thomas M. Davis Charles Sanford
Norman Eliezer Lee Mayton
Norris Johnson Joseph Van Riper
Charles Kline Robert Williamson
Marvin Kobacker William R. Worboy
Women Assistants on the Business
Staff.
Marian Atran Mary Jane Kenan
Dorothy Bloomgarden Virginia McComb
Laura Codling Alice McCully
thel Cont:s Sylvia Miller
osepine Convisser Anm Verner
ernice rGlaser Doothea WatermanI
Annta Golderger Joan Wiese
Hortense Goodiug
SUNDAY, JUNE 1, 1930.
Night Editor-RICHARD L. TOBIN
CONDUCT OF EXAMINATIONS.
Current argument ovr the im-
pending honor system for conduct-
ing examinations in the Literary
College has narrowed itself to a
controversy of principles. Propon-
ents of the idea state that under
the proposal honor is elevated to
its peculiar position of importance
in values, and base their discus-
sions upon the theory involved or
examples of honor system successes
in other colleges. The opposition
reinterpret the honor system theory
and cite examples of the plan's
failure in different schools. The en-
suing discussion has shown little
sign of leaving off its theorizing and
reapproaching the problem from

the view of its relation to the con-j
duct of examinations in our own
Literary college.

does not cringe or become embar-
ssed when he sees a policeman on
he street. He merely recognizes, if!
he thinks of the officer at all, that
he is an instrument which society
has provi'ded for his protection and
o delegate away from private citi-
zens the responsibility and worry of
furnishing their own. So is it when
the student being examined sees a
proctor.
All attempts to compare the
amounts of cheating under the
honor system and under the proc-
or system are of necessity vain.
The issue becomes centered, there-
fore, around which method of su-
pervision would be most effective as
a preventive. Those who favor the
honor system ignore the hetero-
geneity, the size and diversity of
interests and the general lack of
an esprit de corps which exist in the
Literary college. Under these cir-
cumstances any proposal which
looks to personal relationships and
mutual intimate concerns for en-
forcement is blighted from the
outset.
In view of the situation as
sketched above, we favor the reten-
tion of the proctor system as being
the most natural, efficacious and
completely satisfactory solution. We
favor this, however, in the belief
that in essence it embodies every
prerequisite for the elimination of
cheating in the Literary college in-
sofar as that is possible under any
circumstances. It is further evident
that the grounds for virtually every
indictment against the present sys-
tem made by proponents of the
honor plan can easily be removed
by slight adjustments in the
proctor method. Elimination of
watchdog methods on the part of
some proctors, establishment of
closer and friendlier relations of
mutual respect between instructor
and class, entire admission that the
primary aim of the student is to
take the examination at hand
without other responsibility to
police the same all are possible un-
der the proctor system and could
alleviate the slight grievances of
those who see its faults as gravely
inimical to the ideals and self-re-
spect of the students.
We are convinced that the pres-
ent situation calls neither for the
honor plan cure-all nor the com-
placency of its opponents who are
satisfied with circumstances as
they are, but for a rejuvenated
proctor system, quietly and ex-
peditiously functioning without
bluster or watchdog tactics. This
method of conducting examinations
when operated along lines of de-
cent mutual regard by both parties
is not only natural but is without
straining to make a fetish of honor.
0-
THE YALE PLAN.
Yale's recently announced "Aca-
demic Concentration Plan," which
is basicly an attempt to reduce the
intellectual restrictions which are
now attached to the educational
method at the eastern University,
may be regarded as a step in the
right direction toward the perfec-
tion of the slowly developing Amer-
ican system. In a recent statement
tendered by the editors of the
"Yale News" the explanation of
"restrictions" was given a definite
meaning-that of determining just
what and how each student shall
study. Any attempt to clarify and
make advancement upon the pres-
ent "restricted" system is therefore
a definite movve toward improve-
ment.

In urging the adoption of the
concentration plan, the Yale
"News" stated that "the college
mill, which continues to grind out
its diploma stamped products .
should give the more serious mind-
ed raw material a more enlightened
treatment." According to present
'plans, the new system would pre-
sent an Honors course in each field
capable of giving those few schol-
astic minds to be found in each
educational institution a chance to
develop under a highly concen-
trated method.
At present, Yale has a so-called
"honors system" which is so highly
specialized as to limit the student to
but few subjects in each category
outside of the present field in which
he is working. The "News" states
that "the student is forced to
change horses back and forth while
crossing the college streams under
the old plan."
The arguments favoring the pro-
posed "Academic Concentration'
plan are numerous. Besides encour-
aging a sounder and more intimate
relation between student and pro-
fessor, and besides carrying the
"Honors system" to its logical con-
clusion, the plan is one method of
breaking the "lock-step" system of
education. The "News" considers
the newly proposed structure "a
plan wherein the scholar and the

II

OAS c
COMPOSITE
COLUMN IN

11

rt

COMPOSITE COLUMN
By the time this goes to press,1
dear readers, I shall be safe in the
great Northern wilds, which, all
things considered, is extremely for-
tunate. All the boys are turning out
to help me get this off my chest sot
that I may be free to wander at my
own sweet will, my duty to my pub-!
lic discharged.1
Jealousyr
* *
The first thing on the program is
a poem by Johnnie. Wait-I forgot
the main point of this column. I
have grown so envious of the Dra-
matic Festival, the May Festival
and similar nuisances that I have
determined to have a POETIC
FESTIVAL. Now to get on with it.
There was a young girl from
Wacousta
Who was able to crow like a rooster,
Which she did so they say,
'Till a dog bit her one day,
Now she don't do no more like she
usedta.
And here comes one from Frank
Merriwell, a newcomer in our midst.
By the way if Frank doesn't do bet-
ter than Johnnie this column will
never get to press , and thar's my
hand on it, stranger.
* * *
Dear Dan:
I am introducing myself by sat-
isfying one of your dearest longings.
I am allowing you to print my lat-
est limerick, and I doubt not that
it will brighten up the column' no
end.

Music and Drama
MONDAY NIGHT: The opening
performance of Oscar Wilde's Lady
Windemere's Fan with Margaret
Anglin in the role of Mrs. Erlynne:
the Mendelssohn Theatre at 8:15.
-0-
LADY WINDEMERE'S FAN
Margaret Anglin's final appear-
ance= with the Dramatic Festival
company marks at once an antidote 1
to the strenuous intensity of the!
Antigone role and a striking test of
her versatility. Miss Anglin was the

American creator of the role of Mrs.
Erlynne and it has remained the
best example of her work in mod- j _
ern drawing room comedy. The
Festival audience has the privilege
of witnessing her transition fromI
heroism and majesty to the arch-
ness and sophistication of Mrs.
Erlynne. The two appearances
very pleasingly indicate the scope
of Miss Anglin's art.
To Oscar Wilde of the flowing
lavender ties is credited the con-
siderable achievement of restoring
to the English stage the rare quali-
ties of Restoration Comedy. Again
the Tattles and the Mistress Frails,C
the Prues and Sir Simpson Legends
strut the London drawing-rooms,
this time in evening gowns and
swallow tails. It is precious comedy
that Congreve wrote and after the
eighteenth century sentimental
parody of it, English Literature had
despaired of its reappearance. But
Wilde restored it, with slight fem-
ininity, not so much strength, a lit-
tle more lavender in the air, but
none the less effectively.
The Festival Production of Lady
Windemere's Fan presents Miss An-
glin in the role of director. She is
personally supervising the whole
production, manipulating it to her
famous interpretation of Mrs. Er-
lynne, and drawing on her years of
experience in modern comedy.

BROWN-CRESS
Company, In.
INVESTMENT
SECURITIES
Orders executed on allex-
changes. Accounts carried
on conservativ, margin.
Telephone 23271
A N ARBOR TRUST BLDG.
jbts#LOORJ
Some worthwhile
savings on
SHOES
at
ALEXANDER' S
Removal Sale
OVER CALKINS
on State Street

-1
I GERMAN-AMERICAN
HAHN'RESTAURANT
512 East William
The Best Home Cooking
SUNDAY' CHICKEN DINNER,
All Fixings 65c
Breast of Veal, All Fixings 45c
Roast Pork 40c
SUPPER
All Kinds of Steak
Bring Your Family and Friends
G. GIRRBACH, PROP.

Li

Hark To His Master's Voice? Saying

GOTo UNIVERSITY MUSIC HOUSE
For Everything Musical

Lowest Prices:
TFRMS
To Suit.
Play While
You Pay.

Radios:-
Majestic, Victor, Crosley
Pianos:-
Baldwin, Kohier & Campbell
Orchestral Instruments
Victor, Columbia, Brunswick
Records

mm#. a m
NW!BAY l
ix iii mI.

ASK THOMAS HINSHAW, Mgr.
601 East William Street Phone 7515

i

I

There was a young
Orange,
Who didn't like life

man from East
in East Orange.{

But on leaving East Orange,
He stopped at East Orange,
So remained all his life in
Orange.

East

FRANK MERRIWELL.

* * * ..
In order to get the Poetic Festi-
val off to a gay start I have delved
into my treasure trove of' reminis-
cences and have dug up a quaint
old Chinese adage done in perfect
iambic pedometer which I ran
across in one of my literary orgies
some years ago. When I came out
of my trance-but then you
wouldn't be interested in my
headaches anyway. (If you are,
drop around and I'll tell you all
about it)-At any rate, here is the
verse:
A frank, unexpurgated transla-
tion: "Lo, lo, lo, for though imperial
suns reign we delight yes but who
will hold the horses?" Nothing
quite like a Chinese lyricist, is
there? No, I. thought not.
And to end the Poetic Festival
with a bang (proverbial) I offer this
juicy morsel (It's so juicy it drips)
Here's to the Student Council Boys,
Their like you'll never see;
Inactive, yet corruptly so
Divine sublimity!
We said, 'Awake ye councillors
Publicity you've had
Recline no more, nor always snore,
Such lassitude is bad."
"An hundred houses have you called
You've promised this and that-
Come, come O dearest council sweet,
Let's see where you are at."
Alas! the council heaved a sigh,
And nodded it's weak head,
And, turning over, yawned at us,
And went right back to bed.
Jack Rover.
SUGGESTION
As I have been wandering about
the campus of late listening to the
cry of the American Indian, the
Egyptian Sphynx, and the ineffably
sweet melody of the good old Eng-
lish anvil, not to mention the lovely
voice of that famous old Irish insti-
tution the stump speaker, it has oc-
curred'to me that these honor ini-
tiatibns might do a lot better with
a few nice brass cannon to disturb
the peace with. I might add that a
little concrete mixed with the
brick dust that plays such a prom-
inent part in such ceremonies
might add a lot to its permanence
as a lawn wrecker.
He Man.

JOANICA STARRS.
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thurs-
day of this week Play Production,
will' present the prize-winning play
from the recent long play contestI
in the University Hall Auditorium.
This will be Play Production's final
presentation of the season. Tickets
for any of the nights can be ob-
tained by calling at Play Produc-;
tion office in University Hall any
time after two o'clock Monday aft-
ernoon.
Joanica Starrs is the third play
of Mrs. Elizabeth Smith's that has
seen production this year. The con-
sistent quality of Mrs. Smith's cre-
ative work in the drama has at-
tracted considerable .interest in
her work as being the most prom-
ising in the now two-year old tra-
dition of Michigan Plays.
In "Joanica Starrs" Mrs. Smith
takes several hints from her own
one-act play, Wives-In-Law, and
works them out more seriously andf
solidly, in the high comedy vein.j
In the lively banter of the im-
personating blackguard in Wives-'
In-Law there was implicit some en-
tertaining views on the relationship
of husband and wife. In her long
play Mrs. Smith uses a pleasaptly
conventional and tractable plot for
the treatment of these views.
Joanica Starrs, the heroine, takesl
husband David's decision to leave#
home for the glamour of an ignor-
ant harlot very cooly, understand-
ing him well enough to know the!
inevitability of his returning to her.
He, of course, does return, humbly
reconciled to his wife's superiority.
The tragedy of Joanica is that the
wear and tear of this little drama
of departure and reconciliationI
stifles in her finest motives and in-
terests.
STUDENT RECITAL.
Rachel Ramsay; pupil of Nell B.
Stockwell of the School of Music,'
will appear in recital Tuesday night
in the School of Music Auditorium.
Miss Ramsay will be assisted by
Lucille Hoffman, pianist and Helen
Stoddard, Contralto. Her program,,
which follows, closes with two
movements from Arensky's Suite
for two pianos which has been:
popularly received in the recent
recording by Ossip Gabrilowitsch
and Harold Bauer.
Invention .................... Bach
Prelude, Op. 28, No. 15.... .Chopin
Impromptu .............. Reinhold
Rachel Ramsay
Thou'rt Lovely as a Flower......
.IhfJmLUII i ,

FIRST METHODIST
CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Rev. Arthur W. Stalker, D.D., Min-
ister; Rev. Samuel J. Harrison,
B.D., Associate Minister; Mr.
Ralph R. Johnson, Student Di-
rector; Mrs. Ellura Winters, Ad-
visor of Women Students.
10:30 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"THE LARGEST FORGIVE-
NESS," Communion Address, Dr.
Stalker.
12:00 M.-Three Discussion Groups
for Students at Wesley Hall.
6:00 P. M.-Wesleyan Guild Devo-
tional Meeting. Special Senior
Meeting, led by Don Hubbell.
Meet at Wesley Hall promptly and
go out on the hills.
7:30 P. M.-No Evening Service.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
On East Huron, below State
Rev. R. Edward Sayles, Minister
.-oward R. Chapman, Minister for
Students.
9:45 A. M.-The Church School.
Mr. Wallace Watt, Supt.
10:45 A. M.-Church Worship.
Sermon, Mr. Sayles: "In Remem.
t°brance."
The Communion Service
4:45 P. i-All students invited to
meet-at Guild House and walk to
the place of annual senior out-of-
doors meeting. Frank Chandler
will lead. Many seniors will speak.

I

., 1 1

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Mrs. Nellie B. Cadwell, Counsellor
for University Women.
9:30 A. M.-Church School.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon: "The Birthday of the
Christian Church."
5:30 P. M.-Social Hour for
Young People.
6:30 P. .-Young People's Meet-
ing. Installation service for the 1
officers of 1930-1931.
Detroit UNITY Association
REV. V. P. RANDALL
Minister
Sunday Morning Service
-at-
Detroit
Civic Theatre
Woodward at Eliot
11:00 O'Clock
Part of this service is broadcast
through WJR at 11:30 o'clock.
Wednesday Evening Service
-at-~~
Maccabee Building
5057 Woodward
Ground Floor Auditorium
at 8 O'Clock

615 E. University

HILLEL FOUNDATION

THERE WILL BE NO SUNDAY
SERVICES HELD 'D U R I N G
THE REMAINDER OF TIIE
YEAR.
8:30 P. M.--Open House at the
Foundatiot,

. ,

Dial 3779

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
Stare and William
Rev. Allison Ray Heaps, Minister
SUNDAY, JUNE 1, 1930
10:45 A. M.-Morninr Worship.
Children's day program.

;...
-

w .v®e....e.. .. ..ae .........m... ....... . ."11

1.

In an effort, therefore, to i
this academic merry-go-roun
the horseplay of a few of t
terested persons also justifi
figure), we respectfully sugge
the problem be readjudged ar
without either the missionar
of those who hold a brief fi
honor system panacea o:
skepticism and self-justificat
those who oppose the honor Ir
It is undeniable and lame
that cheating exists in the Li
college classrooms; but its ar
though nebulous, may hart
called deplorable. A recognit
this fact has induced the sup
the honor system to base its
cipal arguments rather upon
fits to the entire body of sti
than upon the plan's ability
duce the amount of cheatin
in truth, both sides of this tw
argument in favor of the
plan are equally refutable. I
cursory survey of student o
reveals the reluctance of the
eral run of students to play v
dog' to their peers. But morei
tant than this is the unjusti
expecting that students shot
police duty when they are si
ed to be writing examinations

BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod of N. A.)

11'

11

Fourth Ave. between Packard
William
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale

and

BE CONSISTENT
IN YOUR RELIGION
ATTEND CHURCH
REGULARLY

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Sts.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Rev. T. L. Harris, Assistant
8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion.
9:30 A. M.-Holy Communion.
(Student Chapel in Harris Hall.)
9:30 A. M.-C h u r c h School.
(Kindergarten at 11 o'clock.)

9:00 A. M.-Bible School.
10:00 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon topic: "The Meaning of
Church Membership."
11:00 A. M.-German Service.

11

7:00 P.
League.

M.=Young

People'sI

11:00 A. M.-Holy
Sermon by Reverendl

Communion:
Mr. Lewis,

G' '1

#' '

1

E
f
f
t

. .. .. .. .. . . .. . . .cnumann;
He, the Noblest of the Noble....
........Schumann
Helen Stoddard
Adagio .................... Haydn!
Arabesque ................ Debussy
Juba Dance .................. Dett

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. at Fifth Ave.
Rev. Stellhorn, Pastor
9:00 A. M.-Sunday School.
9:00 A. M.-Service with sermon.
10:30 A. M.-A Preconfirmation
Service.'

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. MRegular Morning
Service. Sermon topic: "Ancient
and Modern Decromancy, Alias
Mesmerism and Hypnotism, De-
nounced."
11:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow-
ing the morning service.
7:30 P. M.-Wednesday Evening

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Third and West Liberty Sts.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor
9:00 A. M.-German Service.
10:00 A. M.-Sunday School.
1. I ~ . A RAT ._._r.--l:..1 ..- C

S. most t

I

!f

1I 11

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