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June 01, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-06-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, JUNE 1, 1930.
UIJIIDKITY ndsen Elected Head ir
UIIIWL tJIII | IILLI' Iof Architectural Club u \1 L
Percy E. Knudsen, '31A, was
elected president for the coming J L
.year of the Architectural society,I
in the poll held Wednesday and1
School of Forestry Aids State Thursday, according to returns an- Division of English to Sponsor
by Instructing Teachers nounced last night. Knudsen led New Volume of Student
on Value of Forests. three other candidates, Martimer Compositions.
oVuoFesHawkins, '31A, Coit W. Mead, '32A,C
and Floyd R. Johnson, '31A, by an,_______________
HOLDS OUTDOOR CLASS easy margin. J,(Continued from Page 1)
Lyle F. Zisler, '32A, received thef
Co-operating with the conserva- vice-presidency. Miss Marjorie G with the grey of last year's book.
tion department in fire prevention McGuire, '31A, and Robert G. ri The new book," Prof. Rowe stat-
work, Professors Ernst V. Jotter and ' 'ar ed recently, "will be not only larger
Shirley W. Allen of the Forestry wick, '31A tied for the secretary- than last year's, but I believe of
school have each spent considerable ship; the disposition of the office more distinction. This is due in
time with an assistant district war- will be settled by next fall. Claude part, of course, to the fact that one
den helping him to bring to the lo- 1M. Gunn, 31A, was named treas- of the best plays of last year ap-
cal people, through school children, ,urer, while Martin E. Cow, Jr., ears with the best plays of this
an appreciation of the value of '31A, was elected curator. year."
forest resources and approximate The Architectural society spon- "Last year's book," he continued,
action to prevent and control fire. sors the annual May party, as well "was the first of its kind to appear
One other interesting extension as all other student activities in at the University. It grew out of
activity is the successful carrying the architectural school, such as the all-campus competition in play-
out of the second annual forestry tours, lectures, banquets, and arch- writing sponsored by the Division
day for the rural school teachers ! itectural publications. of English, the reward to the au-
of Washtenaw county. The object thors being presentation by Play
of the forest days, which were or- Reichstag Production under the direction of
ganized by Prof. Jotter, is to in-g Valentine B. Windt.
spire the teachers to carry on some Visits Prof. Pollock "From the success of the com-
teaching of-forestry at a definite 1petition this year, and particularly
time in their own schools and in Dr. Kaisenberg of Berlin, was the much larger number of good
connection with other subjects. I guest of Professor James K. Pollock plays from which to choose," he
One day last month, 120 teachers of the Political Science department stated, "this second volume should
with instructors from the school of .during his recent brief stay in Ann mark the establishment of a per-
forestry and conservation met at Arbor while making an extensive manent institution for stimulation
Saginaw forest, near Ann Arbor, trip through the United States in and encouragement to dramatic
ard the day was spent in outdoor an endeavor to study federal and writing at the University of Michi-

TAE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

a.. wT.R:

SCHOOL OF FORESTRY EXPERIMENTS Fish Expert Discovers ?LANE CRASHES
WITH TIMBER FROM SOUTH AM ERICA Spawning Abnormality WHILE STUNTING
University Conducts Research . which are worthy of more thorough Lloyd T. Pullum, in charge of the (By ISat Pirs)
i tBozeman fisheries sub-station at SYDNEY, N. S., May 31.-A pilot
With Samples of Wood Sent investigations for industrial uses.orted and his passenger were killed today
From American Jungles. At the present time there are tpwhen the propeller snapped off his
either under experiment, or on the hplane as it was stunting at 500 fee
At the present time the school of yt male Loch Leven trout. This is a and the plane fell into the middle
Forestry and Conservation is carry- way for such investigation, a total marked aberration in the spawning of the main street at Tamworth.
ing on a most important reesarch omof this species since the egg collec- Thie pilot was Frank Mitchell, one
lombia, Mexico, Peru, and Nicara- tiononormally nm of the most widely known airmen
in connection with the timber of tii omly ternh:_asin De ms; ua iin .Australia.
Brazil and certain other . Southbr Only four major institutions exist MP.
American countries. Through the lhuhn n r~e>Vee MS
Amrcncutie.Truhtein the world today which specialize AIhuhn r> ae wr MS Iowa ( APB-The fiti
-pr n heTp-in tmer r d tihpecie available, the eggs were fertilized farmers' annual summer training
er ation in timber research and the Uni- with milt from a rainbow trout. school of the mid-west region wiil
search foundation in Washington,!versity of Michigan is one of the The female Loch Leven died after be held at Ames during the week
D. C., the Astoria manufacturing very few universities carrying on the spawning. of July 14.
and importing company in New work to compare with these organ- -
York, and the Brazilian Forestry izations.
service, samples of South American The importance of this work as
timber are being brought here well as the great benefits to be de-
without any expenditure on the rived can be gleaned from the fact
part of the university. that there is practically no infor- UN D A
Here they are put bhrough a mation now at hand, with rare ex-
number of exploratory tests by ceptions, with respect to the prop- j
Prof. W. Kynoch and his assistants ertes of these woods in South
to secure information on their me- America. Other countries in South
,hanical and physical properties to America are also awakening to the
a sufficient extent to determine importance of this research and
are making numerous inquiries.
(~D' 0 ~ TOURISTS _

i

iA

'THtIRD GLASS
ANY LINE, ANY
, COUNTRY
One. Was,, Round 't'ri,.
or a Rea Low Price Tsui
BOOK NOW
AUTHORIZEDS[EAMSHIP Ad,.
E. G. KEBLER, All Ui
601 E HURON. ANN ARDOIR

PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
We have all makes.
Pemington, Royals.
Corona, Underwood
Colored deco finishes. Price $60.
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State -St. Phone 6615

recminn'8

200 CHAIRS

ONE BLOCK NORTH OF HILL AUDITORIUM

instruction.

sta

ate administration.

gan."

F4

The girl the license
the minister-but the
ring! OH! THE
RING!!
'Wedding rings in the new-
est styles-engraved or
set with jewels.

.,a

t'

Again

1 l i ' I l I I ! 11 1 J i l l

$3,000 PRIZE
For a Campus Novel!
Miss Bett White, a Northwestern co-ed, won the first annual
campus Prize Novel Contest, conducted jointly by College Humor
and Doubleday-Doran, with her novel, "I Lived This Story."

i
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i
t

Who will win the 1930 prize?
Why not YOU? Here is a chance
to win fame and the beginning
of a writing career. The contest;
is open to undergraduates, and
graduates of not more than one
year, of any American or Cana-
dian school.
The novel may be placed in
any modern environment and may
be woven about any set of char-
acters. Choose your own title.

The prize of $3,000 goes to the
best novel submitted, as judged
by the editors of the sponsoring
publishers, and covers serializa-
tion of the story in College Hum-
ot and advance royalties on pub-
lication in book form.
Typed manuscrin't of not less
than 70,000 words should be sent,
with return postage, to either ad-
dress below-must be post-marked
before midnight, October 15,
1930.

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AVING the honor of serving your family dur-
ing graduation exercises will be a pleasure, we
present a menu with a variety which is sure to please
everyone.

lCe' AV%

-

e ur .r

120 West Liberty
CHOP SUEY DINNERS WED. AND SATURDAY
Strawberry short cake with home made b'scuis and real whipped

I

CAMPUS PRIZE NOVEL CONTEST

Care of College Humor
1050 North La Salle St.
Chicago, Ill.

Care of Doubleday-Doran
Garden City
New.York

.. _.
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SEwN IOR % 193V
The Alumni Association of the Unihersitg of Michigan-to which gou will soon
eligible to membership--is the liaison agent charged with maintaining close contact betw6
University and Alumnus. Herewith are detailed just a few of the Wars in which it zz
perform this task next year:
1. Help "interested alumni" to secure special 5. Issue "The Michigan Alumnus" 36 times
consideration in the distribution of tickets to Michi- during the year.
gan's football games in Fall. 6. Cooperate with local University of Michi-
2. Introduce "1930's" to University of Michi- gan Clubs-there are more than 150 of these in all
gan Clubs all over the country-or in foreign parts of the World-in keeping alive the Michi-
lands. gan spirit in their communities.
3. Stage National Dinner in Boston the night 7. Conduct the Third Triennial of University
of November 7th, on the eve of the Michigan- of Michigan Clubs at Cleveland in May when
Harvard football game. alumni will gather from all parts of the World for
4. Aid in prosecution of the Ten-Year Pro- a Michigan conference.
gram-the alumni plan for supplying Special 8. Promote reunions in June for alumni rce
Needs of the University. turning for class gatherings.
If 1930 is to plaa its part in Michigan' 8Alumni historg everg member m ust imm
. , _ .,.P _ 1 1 ., A .;1-.1

be
.enn
'ill

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