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February 23, 1930 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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SU7NDAY, _ M13 Ml'ARtY 23, i130

THE MI:CHICAN DAIL*Y

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MEET FOR CHAMPIONSHIP IN INDOR!FEMININE FLYING
T TOGS EXHIBITED
SPORTS IS PLANNED FOR MARCH 27
BY WOMENS ATHLTCA9SSOCIATION, # :

WARM WEATHER USHERS IN,
ACTIVITIES OF SECOND
Aie b ar ethrofteWheelingW. V,
FuOR w [XT F IOAV Addb wr ete ft phine Kreiser.
mester social activites has come open-house tea
Women's Athletic Association into swing with quite a flourishing Alpha Chi On
and League to Give start. The sororities on campus a dn frh
have carried over the festive atmo- rations for whi
Party Together.hi sphere created by the Hop and thete, and blu
i A~p ~ita rb ine ainHorp: theme of a G

SOCIAL
SEMESTER

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and of Miss Jose-
'31, of Detroit.
Pi is holding an
this afternoon.
mega held an infor-
day night, the deco
ich were in red,

HONORARBY SOCIETY
HOLOS INITIATION
Kappa 'Phi Has Recognition
Service Honoring New

F_ :I I . ". ....' I

Matches Scheduled in
Archery, Fencing,
. and Rifle.

Bowling,
Golf

MASLEN IS CHAIRMAN
Practices in All Sports Begin
Immediately in, Palmer
Field House.
Matches in bowling, rifle, arch-
ery, fencing, and golf will be con-
ducted at the annual all-campus
indoor meet, which will be spon-
sored by the Women's Athletic As-
sociation March 27. Albertina Mas-
len, '31, is managing the meet, in.
co-operation with the intramural
board of W. A. A.
Practices are starting immedi-
ately in all sports, as the board is
anxious to have the meet an exhi-
bition of skill in the various acti-
vities, as well as a contest between
the women on campus. There will
be cups awarded to the final win-
ners of each event.
Women may practice bowling any
day from 4 to 6 o'clock, and from 7;
to 9 Monday and Wednesday, at
the Field house. Any one who in-
tends to compete in the meet must
have at least five practices, as the
scores of the bowlers are to be kept
track of, and the competition at
the meet will be-limited to a maxi-
mum of the twelve women who
have the highest scores in their re-
spective practice strings. A fee of
five cents a string is charged for
pin boys.
Rifle practice is to be held from
3:30 to 5:30 o'clock on Tuesday,
Wedne'sday, and Thursday of each
week until the, meet, at the range,
in the Field house. Beginners asl
well as experienced shots are in-]
vited to come out for this and for
every other sport.
Archery will be practiced from
4 to 6 o'clock on Fridays, while,
golf may be practiced at any time.
The. first practice in fencing will
be held at 4 o'clock Tuesday, Feb.
25, at the Field house. Women who
wish to fence are asked to come in
-gym clothes.
The meet is, open to all women
on campus, and an unlimited num-
ber of entries is permitted for
every sport except bowling. It is
expected, however, that all wo-
men who enter the meet will at-,
tend a reasonable number of prac-
tices in the event they wish to
enter.

CHINESE ALUMNA I
ATTAINS HONORSI
IN NATIVE LAND]
In a picturesque setting not far!
from Shanghai, China, is situated
a small college for women which
should be of interest to every
Michigan student because of its
famous president, Dr. YI Fang Wu
who graduated from the University;
of Michigan in 1928.
Dr. Wu entered Michigan in Sep-
tember of 1922 and received her
noctor's degree in June, 1928. While
she was here she lived for two
years at the Martha Cok building,
and was loved and admired by a
hosts of friends who were pleased
to learn that in November of the
year. she left Ann Arbor she was
inaugurated as president of Ging-
ling College at Nanking.
Gingling College was founded 15
years ago and now has an enroll-
ment of 166 students gathered
from 11 of the 18 provinces, Hang-
kong, Java and Macao.
.Miss Grace E. Richards, adviser
of women, recently heard from Dr.
Wu telling of her work at Ging-
ling and her other interesting
achievements. This fall she was
greatly honored, when she was
made a delegate from China to the
third biennial,. conference of the
Institute of Pacific relations at
Kyoto. She wrote Miss Richards
of this conference, mentioning dis-
tinguished people whom she met,
and stressing "the spirit of co-op-
eration and friendliness even when
such a ticklish question as the Jap-
anese Interest in Manchuria was
discussed very freely at the Round
Tables."
However, Dr. Wu's main interest
centers about Gingling: Here she
has carried back with her many in-
novations from America, and more
particularly from Michigan. For
instance they now have a Fresh-
man Week at Gingling, in order to
receive the incoming students and
acquaint them with college life.
The faculty at Gingling is com-
posed of prominent women such as
Miss Emily Case, formerly director
of health education in Central
Branch Y. W. C. A., Chicago; Miss
Harriet Cogswell, Secretary of the
Y. W. C. A. at Stanford Univer-
sity; and graduates of Smith, Wel-
lesley, Columbia, Chicago and other
well known institutions. Dr. Wu,
as president is known as one of the
foremost educators in China. Those
who knew her, or who are familiar
with her interesting work, recog-
nize in her a graduate of whom
Michigan may be justly proud.
.Athena literary society will
hold tryouts for the second se-
mester at 7:30 Tuesday, Feb. 25,
in the Athena room i Angell
hall. All women are eligible for
trying out, according to an an-
nouncement made by Gale
Saunders, '33L, secretary of the
organization.
Tryonts are requested to
come -prepared to give a two
minute speech on any subject.

PLAN FASHION SHOW
Jane Yearnd, '30, has announced
the first League party of the year
to be combined with the Women's
Athletic Association, Friday Feb.
28. The largest gathering yet as-
sembled for any League party up
to this time is expected, becauseI
added to the attraction,. of the
combination of the two organiza-
tions will be a fashion show in
which eight women from thq Uni-
versity will take part.
Dancing will begin at 3:30 to Bob
Carson's orchestra, with an inter-'
mission from four until five o'clock
at which time the fashion show 1
will take place. .
The style show, the first of the I
season, is sponsored by Rose Root !
of Detroit, and will include a dis-
play of the latest spring fashions
in sports, afternoons and evening,
jgowns. The names of the eight wo-t
men to participate in it will be an-
nounced at a later date.l
After the show refreshments will'
be served, and the dancing will
continue until 5:30. All university
women are invited to attend.
Outstanding women flyers have
organized as the Ann Lindbergh!
flyers of San Diego and have made
Mrs. Annle Lindbergh, wife of the !
famous trans-Atlantic flier, a char-
ter member.

I flve ivti rstlng Gnnes, eas1 hrthiad jJnL by

and dances, and a few have done
second semester pledging already.
Collegiate Sorosis announces the
pledging of Jean Redpatch, '31, of
Maplewood, N. J.
IAlpha Xi Delta gave a formal
(tinner dance Fridayevening at
the Union in honor of the tenth
anniversary of the founding of the
Michigan chapter of the sorority.
The decorations were of ferns, pink
roses, and colored lights carried
out the rose dance motif.
Delta Delta Delta held a formal
tea Thursday afternoon at the
chapter house in" honor of their!
province deputy, Mrs., Edwardl
Haan. Spring flowers were used as
decorations.
The pledges of Kappa Delta en-
tertained the chapter at an infor-
mal dance at the house last night.
The decorations were green and
white. and Bob Carson's orchestra
furnished the music.
Kappa Alpha Theta gave a sup-
per on Thursday night for the al-
umni advisory board of the soror-
ity. The guests were Mrs. Alexan-
der G. Ruthven, Mrs. Thomas Lin-
coln, Mrs. Frances Speddler, Mrs.
Thomas Cassady, and Mrs. Elton
Weiman.
Delta Zeta gave a formal dinner
Wednesday evening in honor of the
new sorority chaperone, Mrs. Myra
Wilcox.
Theta Phi Alpha announces the
pledging of Miss June Hill, '32, of

Alpha Gamm
tai at a tea

'is f e"non ive

for the mothers who live in Ann
Arbor at which Mrs. Walter Ford
and Mrs. Robert Taylor will pour.
Women jockeys rode in a race
Sunday at the Agia Caliente race
track in Mexico. Tecate, the win-.
ning horse, was ridden by Miss Ar-
dath Schnider, a Long Branch
high school girl. She received $100.1
The Misses Mabel Strickland and
Vera McGinnis brought in the
>orse pl c ig second and third
respectively.

Methodist church yesterday after-
noon. The ceremony was folloW-
ed by a recognition service for its
ii-w patronesses, Mrs. Alexander
0. Ruthven and Mrs. George C.
Carrothers, and the initiation ban-
quet which was held in the ball-
room of the League building. Mrs.
H. M. LeSourd, grand marshall of
Kappa Phi, was present for the af-
fair and is spending the weeketid
as a guest at Martha Cook.

e, carrying out the+Patfoness.
eorge Washington
Nu of Kappa Phi initiated fifty
will enter- women in services held in the
ic ' n ft . Cr fl .vb n . .

RE o Y U, .t

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sop

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Evelyn.- Sanner,
Who demonstrated during the
St. Louis aircraft exhibition what
the well-dressed feminine flyer
will wear.
ENGLISH WOMAN
EXPLAINS ABOUT,
COLLEGE SYSTEMJ
"Our college educational system
in England is quite different than
it is here," stated Miss Agnes Ethel
Conway, of Cambridge, England,
Iwhen she was in Ann Arbor on 1r-
1 day. "You see," she said in con-
tinuing, "Girton and Newnham Are
the only women's colleges affiliat-
ed with Cambridge. Each is 9a
dormitory housing 250 women. We
have our own library in connection
with the dormitory, but we share
the university laboratories for any
research work we wish to do along
that line."
Competition for entrance is keen,I
for . out of the thousand or more
women who apply only 500 are al-
lowed 'to go up,' this is enter Cam -
bridge."
Miss Conway herself is a gradu-
at of Newnham College, Cambridge,
She was in the class of 1907. While
in college she was a pupil of the
late . Miss Jane Harrison, noted
archeologist. Miss Conway first
became interested in Greek arche-
ology and has now gradually shift-
ed her field of interest to Petra and
the Edamites. She further stated
that the field of archeology hasl
opened up tremendously since the'
World war and many women are
doing prominent work along that
line. The entrance of women into
this field is no longer difficult now
that the situations in the Near
East have come under control as
a result of the treaty of Versailles.
In 1926 Miss Conway received a
Masters degree. from the Univer-
sity of London in medieval English
history.

YOUR H AT

Panamalaque-'- the new
shiny, light-weight straw
-sponsored by all French
designers -, spring styles
feature brims and shal-
lower crowns. $20.00.

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NEW SPRING
FOOTWEAR

YOUR JEWELRY
Chane's latest costutfe
je w e Ir y - distinctive
pieces for every occasion
-init tion herneite or
colored enamel. 2.2
an'd :up.

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SERVICE WITH

IS PORTRAYED

IN

THESE
JACQUELINE
MODES
i A SMILE

YOUR BELT

Belts to define your new
waistline are of the- ut
most importance-bikles
to match or contrast are
of equal moment-rhine.
stone -metal - ivory
and enamel.

yes we'll~ admit1
its a bit early but the
fsh ionable woman or Miss

I,

IJUNIOR PLAY REHEARS LS

wants new styles early
We are sure you'll
every one of them.

. .
like

YOUR GLOVES

Monday, Feb. 24:
3:30-4:30-Chorus
Room.
3:30-4:30-Chorus
3:30-4:30-Chorus
Room.
4:30-5:30-Chorus
Room.
4:30-5:30-Chorus
4:30-5:30-Chorus
Room.

G. Garden
E. Cave.
FY Ball
A, Garden
C, Cave.
H, Ball

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$5.50, $6.50, $7.50, $8.50
Jaeobson s
THE PRETTIEST SHOES IN TOWN

Gloves of suede - the
fashionabest leather-are
that smart longer leng h
Jo wear with shorter
sleeves : - nutmeg -
bisque - ashes - mode
seed -, are the new
colors. $3.95.

7:30-Cast, Act II, Lounge 2.
7:30-8:30-Chorus B, Commit-
tee Room.
7:30-8:30-Chorus D, Cave.
7:30-8:30-Chorus E (2), Ball
Room.
PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
We have all makes.
Remington, Royals.
Corona, Underwood
Colored duco finishes. Price $60.
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State St. Phone 6615

YOUR HANDBAG

1.

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j .. ...._.. .. . .... ...._. -- - i f i PEI12

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For formal wear the
trend . is toward smaller
bags-deeper than they
are wide -- for spotts-
larger frameless or cover-
ed frame bas $6.95 and
up.

YOUR-LINGERIE

iftekvu
t Y
Close to a Perfect
Understanding.

Perfectly smooth - fitting
lingerie is indispensable-
p r ibhcess petticoats
purethread crepe de chine
trimmed with Alencon
type lace in flesh-white,
eggshell are $5.95.

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YOUR HOSIERY

Sheer chiffons in modified
sun'- tans - Beige Blonde
- Aloha - L'Avenue-
with French heels. $1.95.

II

YOUR SHOES

II

Opera pumps -- sm artc
for every occasion - ex-
cept active sports.- in
t~idl ' m t.-i4nrhr

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( Jia,' ..... ..... ,.. ... ...

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