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October 17, 1929 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-10-17

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w

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1920

T HE MICIHIGAN

15 A It Y.

I ----

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nrIEAnui rnnrFall Returns to Court in Wheel Chair
RI ftr~n IN "Fail

/lA^'F!1'NS

CALLS SIX UNIVERSITY
PHYSICS PROFESSORS
Michigan Men Invited to Ad-
dress Meeting of Theoretical
Physics Societies.
TWO REMAIN IN EUROPE
Duffenback and Uhlenbeck Plan
to Continue Research
Work Abroad.
Research work, advanced studies,
and lectures took six professors
from the physics department of
the University to Europe during
the past year, some of whom have
returned this fall. Others are con-
tinuing their work abroad.
Prof. S. A. Coudsmit, who is an
eminent authority in spectroscopic
research, was invited to give lec-
tures at various universities in
Europe this summer. He lectured
on the subject of spectroscopic re-
search at the Universities of Brus-
sels, Stutgaart, Copenhagen and at
the Sorbonne in Paris. While in
Copenhagen, he attended the Con-
gress on Theoretical Physics. Pro-
fessor Goudsmit also did wask ini
spectroscopic research at the Uni-I
versity of Tuebingen in Germanyc
and, at the University of Amster-
dam in Holland.l
Prof. O. S. Duffenback attended
the Symosium of the Faraday So-
ciety held this summer at Bristol,
England, and is now in Germany
at the University of Goettingen as
a fellow under the John Simon
Guggenheim Memorial fellowships.
He~ is working with Prof. .
Franck of the University of Goet-F
tingen, and is doing research workc
in conduction of electricity
through gases. Professor Duffen-c
back is the second man from thec
physics department to go to Eur-
ope under the Guggenheim Fellow-7
ships, the first being Prof. R. A.t
Sawyer, who studed there severali
years ago.
Prof. E. F. Barker attended thex
Symposium on infra red spectrat
held by the Faraday Society att
Bristol, England, this summer.
Both he and Prof.. C. F. Meyer
were invited to read papers at this
meeting, but only Professor Barkert
went. Professor Barker read a
paper prepared jointly with Pro-
fessor Meyer on their research
work in infra red spectra done in
the department.l
Prof. Otto Laport spent the sum-_
mer at the University of Munichl
doing research work in theoretical
physics. He resumed his work inr
the department this fall.c
Prof. George Uhlenbeck spent ther
summer and is continuing this
semester at the Universities of
Leyden and Utrecht doing research
work in theoretical physics.
Prof W. F. Colby and Mrs. Colby
spent their vacation in Europe thisc
summer.P

'i

1L Z . .A~.A~ Y~AZI. J. ,ll w r rc y 1Lr LJ"odors)I

Chief Justice of Courts in Philippines
Presents Two Tables to Lawyers Club
EContinued from Page l the decisions of the Spanish Su-
_____ te "ar canals of192 wee apreme court still in our library.,
, he"arsanas"of126wrea; piansfo dmsso t hebr oThey were written in long hand.
Father of Boy Serving Life Term icantar sandas" o baro The ink they used must have been
Seeks Parole on Eve of forget their examination papers of a very fine grade of ink. The
because of the high standard set writing does not seem to have
Departure for West. by the Supreme court, in which is fadded. The writing is as plain to-
vested the authority to grant ad- day, apparently, as the day it was
MATTER IS DROPPED mIission written. Very few decisions of that
he Court cover more than one-half of
(y .ciatedress) "When I arrived in Manila,"h the ordinary size of a page. it is
LANSING, Mich.,Oct. 16.-Ar- writes, "the insurrection was still indeed very interesting to read
thur C. Ric , of Battle Creek, will on, and I was not permitted to go them.
thu C.Ric, o BatleCrek, illoutside of the city of Manila with-cuti o
remain in the Michigan State 1out e fthcity or m w "The Supreme court is now com-
Prison, where he is serving a lifeliary escort. I traveled osed of nine justices-five Ame-
term for an attack on Miss Louise through a number of the prov cans and four Filipinos. The work
King, while she was a co-ed at the for the purpose of organizing of the courts has increased rapid-)
Battle Creek College. His plea for courts, accompanied by military during the American occupation
clemency has been denied by Gov. escort. I encountered great hard- l uigteAeia cuain
cleteny as ee deiedbyGov -Notwithstanding, I am informed;
Green and Arthur D. Wood, com- ship. I was obliged to travel on th ta nding formeda
misson o hosebak. mad onetri covr- that there are pending for triali
mission of pardons and paroles. horseback. I made one trip cover bout fifty thousand cases
The refusal to open the doors of ing about 140 miles in going from
' the prison to Rich was made one province to another. The work ,In 1901 practically all of the of-
known today after the prisoner's which I did then was surely pioneer fices in the Philippine Government
father, George D. Rich, Battle work, in an effort to establish were held by Americans. Today
Creek manufacturer, and his attor- courts throughout the Philippine practically every office is held by
ney, James Mackey, of Marshall, islands. It might be interesting to ( Filipinos. I have seen the progress
had called on Gov. Green. you to know that the Supreme of the Filipino people from the
Mr. Rich asked the Governor if, court of the Philippine islands is very beginning of the American
before the family's early departure the successor of the Supreme Court occupation. They are a good people
for California, where they will re- organized by the Spanish Govern- and worthy of all that the United
side, he might have a word of en- ment in the Philippine islands 207 States can do for them. They are
couragement that his son would be years before the Supreme court of industrious, intelligent and most
paroled. The Governor told him the United States was organized. hospifable. You have seen many of
that he contemplated no action, "We have a number of volumes of them as students in the Univer-
now or at any other time, in the mend a parole. sity."

SCHOOL O-f EDUCATION
ISSUES NEWBULLETIN

For the first time since its foun-
dation, the School of tEducati614
has published a bulletin. It is at
present more or less in the expe-
rimental stage, but it is hoped by
its sposors that, through its value
as a means of communication bp-
tween the school and its connec-
tions outside the University, it will
prove worthy of continued support.
The publication will, for the
present, be managed by the faculty
of the Educational School.

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Associated Press Photo
Afcer being warned not to continue on trial until his health had
improved, Albert B. Fall, 68-year-old defendant, returned to the court-
room An a wheel chair. His defense to the charge that he had ac-
cepted a $100,000 bribe from E. L. Doheny received a blow recently
when the jury was given the Sinclair-Teapot Dome scandal to com-
plete the prosecution's picture of corruption.

case; and that as the result of con-
ferences with Mr. Wood, "the mat-
ter had been dropped."
Rich was sentenced to prison by
Judge Charles B. Collingwood, of
Lansing. In a petition for parole
filed some months ago, Rich's at-
torney charged that Judge Col-
lingwood had erred in many in-
stances during the trial. The vari-
ous charges were investigated by
i Mr Wnnr d ndr ihis 7re ortn. wa m A p

rVi. WooU
NA V Y DA Y TO BE CELEBRA TED THIS j during s
MONTH IN MEMORY OF EDWIN DENBY Governo
In memory of the late Edwin recognization of a ratio in naval Toda
Denby,. '96L, secretary of Navy in strength as a means of avoidingI
President Harding's cabinet and (competition." Ht
one of Michigan's most famous "Two policies as laid down in this
alumni, Navy Day will be celebrated document are sound in principle Billi
on Monday, October 28, 1929, ac- and represent the professional l
cording to Colonel Walter C. Cole, opinion of the naval experts of this I
vice-president of the Metropolitan country. Support therefore of the
Trust Company and chairman of policy and the adequate naval de-
the Navy Day celebration for Mich- fense can not be interpreted as be-
igan. ing opposed to naval disarmament
"That Denby played an im- as provi ed for in treaties which'
portant part in our scheme of na- this country may enter to limit our
tional defense is evident, seeing naval armament."
that the first Naval Policy this E ------ - -
country ever; had was adopted dur-
ing his administration as Secre-
tary of the Navy," stated Cole. C
"The funds mental naval policy of
the United States is that the Navy
should be' maintained in sufficient
strength .to support the country's
policies and commerce, and to
guard its continental and overseas
possessiorns. The policy recognizes
the Washington Treaty' limitin 1 This is the Band you want to make
Naval Arament as the supreme law your party a big success.
of the powers governing their IYAINERS
naval armament as to capital ships, SIX SNAPPY ENTFT
aircraft carriers, and the size and
armament of cruisers. It also BensA Blue Blowers
recognized that the spirit of the i "We Satisfy"
Treaty indicates two elements of
international import:-a general 4310 Phones 6749
desire to avoid competition in J ,
Naval Armament and a partial

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