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October 17, 1929 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-10-17

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NAD O

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, MA

III sums

\TRAVEL TALKS . CABOT RECEIVES /
I FEATURE FIRST Wins Beauty Contest POSITIONS FROM
CLUBMEETING HARVARD BOARD-
Ellis Ball Chosen as President Dean of Medical School Named

Victorious Airman

STOUT RECOMMENDS
IN RUNWAYS AT ANN

IMPROVEMENTS
ARBOR AIRPORT

AT DETROIT FACTORY

of University High
French Group.

Members of the French Club of
Company to Have Big 400 Acre the University High school held its
first meeting on Tuesday. Betty,
Landing Field Near Jane Dawson, the retiring presi
New Factory. dent, acted as chairman and pre-
sented the speakers of the after-
* R WILL START SOON noon, students who have recently
been in France.
E tOrB nrlnr, dnn'nAr, tha cnian

Receive Orders for Manufacture
of 1,000 New Planes
Immediately.
Detroit's newest addition to the
aviation industry, the Dare Air-
plane company, will soon swing in-
to manufacture of their product at
Milan where 25,000 square feet of
floor, space has been bought forj
production purposes, along with a
400-acre flying field, it is an-
nounced by the company.
The design of this new plane"
which has been approved by sev-
eral of the country's leading aero-
nautical engineers, will be as per-
fectly stream-lined as is possible in
a commercial ship. One of the
unique features of this new plane
is its landing speed of 15 to 30,
miles an hour, due to the variable
chamber of the wings which also'
allow the plane to get off the
ground more rapidly, with less run,
and carrying a greater load.
Two Types of Plane.
Production plans of the company'
call for the immediate construc-
tion of two planes; one a two-
place open cockpit job for entry in
the Guggenhteim Safe Aircraft
competition to be held in New York
this. fall, and one ship for general
demonstration and show purposes.
At the present time, according toj
company officials, there are orders'
for approximately 1,000 planes now
on the file, the orders ranging
from one to 48 planes. At the same
stime it was stated that applica-
tions from 1,000 student fliers had
been received during the past 30
days, with instructions to begin as
soon as manufacturing is under,
Way.I
Fourteen ships will be built be-;
tween now and the first of the
year and beginning Jan. 1, the or-,
ganization will manufacture 20
planes, with 25 in ,February, 30 in
March, 35 in April, 40 in May, 50j
in June, and 50 each month until
next October, when production will
be regulated according to the de-
mand.I

I zvereut sursiey opene atine series
of talks with a short discussion on
the massave trans-Atlantic liners
and the individual's daily routine
on ship board. Picturesque descrip-
tions of chateaux and the life in
French pensions Harriet Hunt and
Ellis Ball added to the afternoon's
interesting program.
A vivid description of Mont
Saint-Michel illustrated with pho-
tographs diversified the short dis-
cussions. The awe-inspiring ac-
count of a bicycle trip from Paris
to Avignon by Bob Howell and his
brothers typified the kind of enter-
tainment the student speakers had
for the members of the club.
Historical details of the ancient
city, Carcassonne, were revealed in
Clinton Ford's brief anecdotes re-
lating to his interesting visit there.
SCREEN
> j REFLECTIONS

School of Public Health '
Committee Head.
Returning from Harvard uni-'
versity, Dr. Hugh Cabot, dean of{
the School of Medicine, yesterday
told in an interview important
functions of the Harvard Board of
Overseers, to which he has been
recently appointed. Dr. Cabot has
been elected to several positions on
the board, including chairman of
the School of Public Health com-
mittee, and member of the Medical
School committee.
The Board of Overseers, accord-
ing to Dr. Cabot, is a college insti-
tution found only at Harvard. The
differentiating feature is that the
Board, consisting of five men serv-
ing for six years, is notappointed,
but elected by the vote of every
Assocsate rPrr. Pho>to active Harvard alumnus. Alumni
Mary Agnes Williams, are thus given an indirect but ac-
Who has been chosen the most tive part in important college
beautiful girl at Greensboro col- problems, for the Board of Over-
lege, Greensboro, N. C., in a contest seers has direct veto over acts of
held there recently. Harvard's Board of Regents. Fur-
ther indirect power of alumni
brought about by workings of the
Fire Causes Damage i Board of Overseers in advising the
to Washtenaw House various departments and in raising
endowments.
Dr. Cabot further states that
Fire of undetermined origin "Because alumni elect a body of*
which started shortly before 11 men having definite powers and
o'clock yesterday morning at 'she duties regarding the university,
home of Misses Jennie and Flora and because each alumnus has a
Buell, 2012 Washtenaw ave., caused vote in the election, alumni inter-
considerable damage to the upper est in the university is always as-
part of the structure. sured.
The fire started in the southwest
corner of the third story of the Seven hundred students and
house and had gained much head- faculty members attending the an-
way by the time the fire depart- nual College of Agriculture's peanut
ment arrived. The room in which banquet, U. of Illinois, graciously,
the blaze started was used for stor- devoui'ed 150 pounds of peanuts, 50
age purposes and the third floor gallons of cider, and eight bushels
was occupied by student roomers. of apples.

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To render the runways of Ann should be covered with a pavement
Arbor's airport fit for year-round top of some type, such as the com-
service for ships of all types and mercial Tarvia preparation. To
weights, they should be construct- further insure satisfactory main-
ed with sub-grades, ballast, and tenance of the work already done,
hard surfacing of some pavement measures should be taken to bind
material. Such is the opinion ofjthe sides to prevent sinking and
William B. Stout, president of the disintegration in the softer earth
Stout Metal Airplane Co., of Dear-|at the port," he asserted.
born, a division of Ford Motor Co.,! Mr. Stout explained that heavy
who was in Ann Arbor today for the wheel loads on airplanes of mod-
purpose of addressing freshmen in ern design make necessary a run-
the engineering college on "Avia- way which would bear up undei
tion." the load imposed by a large, loaded
Mr. Stout flew from Dearborn to motor truck. The Ford planes
Ann Arbor and return in one of place a three-ton load upon two
the Ford tri-motor ships, of which surfaces of approximately six
he is the designer. square inches each.
"The graveling of the runways In the opinion of Mr. Stout, the
at the Ann Arbor port is a helpful larger airport will be a vital part
measure," he said. "However, it of aviation for a long period of
should not end there. In order to years, despite the work that experi-
present a surface which will bear menters are doing to provide ships
up during bad weather, the gravel which will rise vertically.
toUNIVERSITY MUSIC HOUSE
For Everything Mfusical

#

Associated Press Photo
Lieut. Harry A. Sutton
Of the Army Air corps reserve
was awarded the Clarence H. Mac-I
kay trophy in recognition of the
most meritorious flight services
performed by an army pilot in 1928.
Art and Gift Shop
218 South State Street
Invites you to Inspect the
Large Line of
Hollowe'en Novelties and
Favors
Masks and Masquerade
Costumes
Foot Balls, Novelties and
Forms
Don't Forget Our Lending Library
MARY M. KRESS, Hostess

Pianos You Want. We
Radios
Phonographs
Records
Violins
Banjos
TERMS Horns
To Suit! Sheet Music
Play While You Pay Music Books

e Have It
r.0 mdfor tM ebeet in murki
Now i HAVE TWO JOBS
The best in music
~The ilnest inradio
SATISFACTION
Or Money Back
Pianos Rented
Lowest Rates

Current Features
MICHIGAN: Jack Oakie and Eve-
lyn Brent in "Fast Company."
MAJESTIC: Monte Blue and May
McAvay in "No Defense."
WUERTH: Warner Oland andE
Neil Hamilton in "The Mysterious
Dr. Fu Manchu."
Fast Comedy.
Foremost among the new order
of talking picture comedians is one
Jack Oakie, who gets his laughs
not through pantomine or any of
the old devices of the silent funny-
man, but by fast, snappy, ultra-
modern "wise-cracking." Possessed
of a voice and manner well-suited
to this style, he has already estab-
lished himself as a prime favorite
after roles in "Street Girl," "Hard
To Get," and several other films.
Now he is featured at the Michi-
igan in "Fast Company," a comedy
from the pen of Ring Lardner, in
which he is the small town boy who
makes good in a big way. Besides
Oakie, there's an able cast headed
by Evelyn Brent, Skeets Gallagher,
and Gwen Lee, the latter losing her
job at the five-and-ten "because
she couldn't remember the prices."
The picture travels along at a
lively clip, consistently amusing
throughout. It's a likeable film,
well-worth seeing.

ASK TOM HINSHAW, Mgr.
601 East William Street Phone 7515

I''',

FREE

FREE

FREE

FREE FREE FREE

SAX
Ha a l

ROHMER'S THRILLER
Ann Arbor Soell Bound-You Must Meet
"THE MYSTERIOUS
DR. FU
MANCHU"
C aramnount
giur

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FREE
WZ

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r

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Close to Airports.
Close proximity to airport facili-
ties near- Ann Arbor and Detroit,
railroad facilities and excellent1
hiWhways led to the acceptance of

NOW
SHOWIN

Four Shows Daily: 2:00--3:20-7:00-9:00
G WUFR.,TH Al

LL THIS
WEEK

9%.3

the Milan offer, it was stated. B. J. A.
According to F. G. Dunn, vice-
president and managing director Northwestern University: En-
of the organization, the Dare com- rollment is larger this year than
pany is now a closed corporation, ever before. It totals more than
capitalized for $500,000. 11,000 people.
JUNIORS
EVERY JUNIOR SHOULD KNOW
SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING
A knowledge of these subjects is of great personal
value and will open up to you many positions in busi-
ness. A mastery of bookkeeping is also useful.
One or two hours each day or two evenings a
week will enable you to obtain this practical training.
Our location at State and William Streets is close to
the campus.

SENIORS
the time is getting shorter,
shorter.

LL1
w
w
w
L~.1

MONDAY, OCT. 14 TO SATURDAY, OCT: 19
MEN'S HATS
Cleaned and Blocked Absolutely Free
With Every
Suit, Topcoat, Overcoat
Cleaned and Pressed
ALL FOR ONLY
$100

wz
1W

i

i

Get your picture

receipts

at the 'Ensian Office.
Make an appointment with
one of these Offical Photo-
graphers.

I

I

11

DEY

RANDALL-ARMSTRONG

Individual Instruction

Enter any Monday

RENTSCHLER

SPEDELING

HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
J State and William Street
THE LIVING SCREEN
Presents Today and Friday
An Alvanche of Action!
MONTE BLUE
MAY
/MAAVOY
4D:MSM
. 200

i The Talking
1K!C1 rn Screen's
Funniest
Hit!

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Cleaned and Blocked Absolutely Free
With Every
Ladies' Dress or Coat
Dresses regardless of number of pleats-Coats with or without fur
Cleaned and Pressed
ALL FOR ONLY
$150
We Call. For and Deliver

LADIES'

HAT S

W
I4

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From the
stage-hit b
Ring

ELMER'S HERE, FOLKS! And is he
modest? You should hear him! Accord-
ing to Elmer, he's the greatest thing that
ever hit this town-and he proves it! Judge
for yourself-SEE and HEAR Ring Lard-

All-Talking

W
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