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October 06, 1928 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OCTOBER 6, 1928

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

PAGE

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RMEN TO HEADVAIRI
FOR SOPHOMORE Cl

MISS JOHNSON . SAYS PURPOSE
OF CIRCUS IS TO HELP
ITO UNITE CLASS
VOTE WILLBE MONDAY
Women Are Urged to Contribute
Both Ideas and Work to
Success of Project

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Nominations of the committee
chairmen for the Sophomore Cir-
cus were made yesterday. The
nominees for the various commit-
tees who will be voted on at 4:00t
o'clock Monday afternoon in the
parlours of Barbour Gymnasiumf
are: General Chairman, Roberta
Reed, Barbara Swift and Hermine,
Soukup;, Finance, Janet Woodman-
see, Ruth Van Tuyl and Isabelle,
Rayen; Stunts, Helen Wilson, Ade-
laide Symons and Jane Robinson;1
Music, iMaurine Jacobs, Jane Year-
nd and Grace Taylor; Properties,
Janet Michael, Jeanette Dale and
Ruth- Taylor; Costumes, Florence
Frandsen, Dorothy McGuffie and
Frances Jennings; Publicity, Helen
Humphrey, Helen Dominie and
Hilda Braun.
Beartice Johnson of the Advisors'
office in an interview Friday, ex--l
plained the purpose of the Sopho-1
more circus as being an effort to
unite the class in the interests of
a large project. Each year friend-
ships are broadened, concentrated
work achieved and much valuable
experience obtained from partici-
'pation in the circus.
At the fourth annual Sophomore
Circus to be given during the Wo-
men's League and Inter-Church
.Bazaar early in December there
will be two performances on Friday
and three on Saturday. The per-
formance .held Saturday mornig
is for the entertainment of the
small children. In the past, after
the bills rave been paid by the
Finance committee, there, was usu-
ally $200.00 cleared and these pro-
ceeds were given to the Women's
League for the undergraduate quo-
BOARD OF REPRESENTATIVES1
The Board of Representa- I
tives of the Women's league
J will meet this morning at 10
o'clock in room 110 at the Li-1
brary. Presidents of all Lea- .
gue houses, dormitories and
sororities are expected to be j
present, and important busi-
ness will be taken up at the
meeting.'
MIC HIGAN DAMES'
REOPENMEETINGS
The first meeting of the Micd'
gan Dames, the social club for the
wives of students, was held this
week. Each meeting consists of
some sort of: entertainment, as
well as a short' talk. At this meet-
ing Miss Beatrice Johnson discuss-1
ed a few of the achievements
madei by the University in the pastJ
year, notably the University col-
lege and the ;new field house fo
women.1

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LEAGUE TO GIVE ROSA PONSELLE, WHO WILL SING IN AN
FOOTBALL PARTYi WEDNESDAY, HAS LED FAIRY-LIKE
fl S RENO INrA___ (By R. L. K.)
CWhoeverhas heard of a football Onceupon a time-and so starts
__________________ patythe story of Rosa Ponselle's dram -
ta toward the new building. That, We hadn't either, until they told atic soaring to the heights of ope- e
so far as is now known, will be the us about it, and now it appears ratic fame. It seems like such a(
plan for this year. that the Women's league is going fairy story that written down in,
to give one of the things next Fri- black and white, it sounds as{
Women with ideas which they day We just got wind of it, but though the chronicler was a mem-
believe would contribute to the dy ejs o ido t
success of the project are urged anyway, it is to be in Barbour ber of the clan of Ananias. It is !
sogest in tuh pwijth the hairman gymnasium at 4:15 in the after- a Twentieth Century tale that
to get in touch with the chairman noon. smacks more of Grimm than pro-E
after the elections Monday, or to Sarah Caswell Angell hall is to saic Today.
talk with Miss Johnson. All Soph- be decorated to' look just like a foot- Ponselle Born in Connecticut ,
omore women should come out, as ball field; greensward, goal posts, Rosa, as a, wee little girl, lived in
there is need for versatile talent stadium,; and everything. There Meriden, Conn., where she was,
and the meetings which will be will be a University band to play born. Her parents were both born{
held at the first week are primar- (for dancing), and a new fangled in Italy but had emigrated and'
ily to find women with some spe- kind of tag dance, called a football settled in the United States in an.
cial aptitude, and to place them dance. Hot dogs, cider, and pea- unpretentious home in Connecti-'
on committees. nuts maybe, will be given out from cut. There, were a number of oth-
"Although the practice for about a very "atmospheric" hot dog er children, but Rosa seemed to be _
two weeks before the performances stand. Some sprightly entertainers the one who sang and sang and,
is necessarily strenuous," conclud- are promised by the committee in sang.
ed Miss Johnon, "sophomore wo- charge of the party, and a sort of Always at her simple household
men who have participated in past a football clog is to fill the bill. duties, she warbled-songs if she Rosa Ponselle
circuses all agree that a great deal The only thing which will dis- knew them, if not, just bits of mel-
of fun is to be derived from both tinguish everything from a real ody. The neighbors all knew Rosa1 "nickelodeon" houses-recognized
the practices and the four per- football game is the fact that and her pretty voice, and remark-aindhosa t
formances themselves." things will be free. l ed how constantly she sang. It n rnning card and hireAnd er
was in her and she had to sing. Saturday night Rosa would receive
Prof. Nelson Believes In Freedom Of Father, coming home from work, her wages from him, hurry home
was always greeted by her merry to Mother, and tumble twelve dol-
Expression In College Class-room voice.s heaudie lar bills into her lap-proud of be-
Soon she increased heuricer ing able to help Mother, and flush-
"Primness in class-room discus- my last four years. But there ex- by singing inthe church choir, ed with the joy of recognition..
"Prmnsswhere she got her first bit of train- Even in this little movie house,
sion, the one great objection to isted another equally poor extreme ing. Every Sunday regularly, Rosa Rosa Ponselle's fame spread, and
co-education, is rapidly disappear- wherq' a Radcliffe student in walk- sang in her childish treble variou it was not longse before the owner
ing," stated Professor Norman Nel- ing down the campus felt that she, kinds of ecclesiastical music, of the leading hotel in New Haven
son of the Rhetoric department. as a woman, was just merely tole- Sings in "Nickelodeon" House !had made a special trip to Meriden
"Both in my under-graduate work rated . The village movie manager
at Minnesota, and later in my "It was with gladness that 1 her ville movie p ri to investigate the reports of 'a child
teaching, I resented," complained again entered a mid-western uni- ownerfone_ fthosprimiivt wonder, and stayed to offer hei
Professor Nelson, "the' lack of free- versity. Here I noted with pleas- rfte dollars a week-a fabulous
dom which marked the discussions ure the fast disappearance of fortune-thfanc With high hopes
that took place in mixed classes. primness and lack of freedom of TWut A ILR INS and fancy dreams, Rosa set off on
"Later at Illinois the same fault expression in the classroom. the long road, the end of which
was noticeable. This situation did "Students should appreciate the AT
not exist at Harvard where I spent value of their contacts with men Travels With Vaudeville

N ARBOR NEXT Women Co-operate
LIFE AS WARBLER With Regents In
but six months to study grand op-
era methods, and at the early age "No Smoking" Rub
of twenty-one, Rosa Ponselle join- -
ed the Metropolitan Opera com- Although all women on campu
pany. may not be aware of the fact, ther
Appears For Third Time Here is a ruling made by the Regent
For ten years she has been add- of the University p r o h i b i t i n
ing triumph to triumph and in- smoking in all University build
creasing her fame, not only as an ings, and the Judiciary council o
operatic singer but as an artist on the Women's league is co-operat
the concert stage. Ten years ago, ing with the Regents In enforcin
she made her debut in New York this rule. The Council Issued
as a supporting artist to Caruso warning yesterday to all Univer
The following spring she appeared city women that action will be tak
before Ann Arbor audiences dur- i n tsa action i ge
ing the annual May 'Festival Con- en in case of any case of infringe
cert Series. Two years ago shement, beginning immediately.
agai graed. Hill yAditriuag h Smoking in rooms of the Librar
again graced Hill Auditorium; and and Angell hall has continued i
now on October 10th--next Wed- spite of the Regents' ruling, bu
nesday-she appears for her third will not be allowed to continue
performance in Ann Arbor, far The League does not take a stan
more famous than ten years ago, either for or against women
but beautiful, charming and ver- smoking.
satile.
GRANDMOTHER IS STUDENT CHEMICAL.SOCIETI
AT UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS MEETS THURSDA
"My greatest ambition now in TO HEAR LECTUR
life is to be able to write a news { k
story fit for publication," said Mrs. Simpson Memorial Hospital, th
Harriet . Hamilton, 65-year-old ne rsa ch o pi lf r, e ni
great-grandmother and second w reseah hospital for pernic
year journalism student at the ous anaemia, was the meeting
University of Arkansas. Mrs. place of Iota Sigma Pi Thursda
Hamilton. entered the University night. Iota Sigma Pi is a nation:
last fall to continue her education, honorary chemical society for jur
pickm uJ.tin the trand wha rad. hh

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g p,1C ran s wnere sne
left them more than a half cen-
tury ago.
Purdue University-T h is year
twenty-nine girls in the school of
Home Economics are specializihig

ior and senior women, and thiE
was the first meeting of the year
Dr. Raphael Isaacs, assistant di-
rector of Simpson Memorial Insti-
tute and assistant professor o
medicine, talked to the member
of the society on the subject o

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in institution management, usin
as a laboratory the' campus lunc
room in the Home Economic
building.

.gpricious anaemia ae eso
ed them through the buildi
h ota Sigma Pi does not elect
cs new members until later in I
year.

GOLF INSTRUCTOR,
GIVE*S ITE I
Golf, which is fast becoming as
great a social requirement as;
bridge or dancing, cannot be learn-
ed simply by taking a few lessons
from some high-priced profession-
al, according to Miss Ella McCor-
mick, instructor in golf for women
of the Univdrsity.
"Skill isyneeded besides mere
lessons, says Miss McCormick, and
this comes only from constant
practice.
"Freshnn women now have an
excellent chance to develop their
golf during their, four years of col-
lege life, due to the new ruling
which allows them to participate
in this sport during their first year
and continue , the sport through
their four years of college.
A tournament with breakfast
served on th golf course is being
planned for either this fall or next
spring, according to Miss McCor-
mick. Last year such a tourna-
ment was held for the first time,
and Martha Fourbes at that time
announced as the winner of the
tournament with a score of 101..
Mrs. Stewart Hanley, who was
last year women's state champion,
is planning to visit the University
to help in instructing golf again
this year.

who, as their instructors, super-t
vise and contribute to such class-
room discussions," Professor Nel-
son warned. "A man like Steward
Sherman of Illinois, who died re-
cently, did much of his open-mind-
edness to pave the way for Carl
Sandberg. Such men as Sherman
wield a great influence over the
literary minds of the nation. At
the same time, because they 'come
so recently from the ultra-conser-
vative school, they bring with them
a steadiness which is of great im-
portance to the modern school of
literature.
"Nor should the work of Irving
Babbit, and Paul Elmer More, both
Harvard men who -represent the
ultra-conservative school, be over-
looked," cautioned Professor Nel-
son, "for their personalities, and
the clear depths of their thoughts
play a great influence on modern
literature. Again, I say students
should value instruction received
through the class-room discussions
of such men as these three.
ii

Freshmen and other entering
women were entertained by W. A.
A. yesterday afternoon at the new
Field House.
The occasion was a tea given in
the reception room for the purpose
of introducing the entering women
to the Advisers of Women. The
party was very informal and bridge
and dancing provided entertain-
ment.
The staff of the physical educa-
tion department and other mem-
bers of the faculty were present.
Those who are interested in class
or intra-mural teams had the
privilege of talking and becoming
acquainted with the various in-
structors who will direct athletics
throughout the year.
About 150 women were present
at the tea.k

Her elder sister, also gifted, had
in the meantime entered "small
time" vaudeville, and after a time
Rosa left the New Haven hotel,
joined her sister, and together
they traveled from coast to coast
on the Keith circuit for about
three years, eventually becoming
reigning favorites. This was an-
other invaluable lesson for Rosa,
because on the vaudevilleystage,
she became versed in the ways and
traditions of the stage, and was
ready when the big opportunity
came to her to bid for the highest
honors within the gift of musical
America.
Caruso himself became interest-
ed in her ability, suggested her to
Gatti-Casazza, and the resulting
audition ended in Miss Ponselle's
signing "on the dotted line" for a
contract for an operatic role. With

== IIIIIIIIIIII ltll l llill llt lilll lll ll lli111I111Uilt1111111t11'111N 1f11111 il
IClark's T'ea Roon11
-= is opening today to
give you those real
HOME COOKED DELICACIES
you have been looking. for
Delicious Salads and Sandwiches
w Pies and Cakes
South versity
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! 1

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SELL CHRISTMAS CARS
PERSONAL STATIONERY
CORP. OF NEW YORK
Here is your chance to earn big
money in spare time. No experience
necessary, selling newest thing in per-
sonalized Christmas cards. Available
for the first time. Assortment of -20
different designed cards, all steel die
engraved with choice of greeting and
name plate engraved to match. Box
of 20 cards retails for $2.25 of which
75c is yours. Easy to sell from our
beautiful selling display furnished free.
Write today-Dept. C 42, 503 5th Ave.,
New York City.

._,!

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-77 7,--'

Just a Reel of
Really Real News
from the
FEDERAL
ATTENTION
Faculty-Student Body
and Townsfolks
We invite you to eat your
meals and lunches amid home-
1 i k e surroundings, in our
restaurant. Everything as
mother would have it.
Full Meal .... 45c
Vege. Dinner . 35c
Plate Luncheon . 35c
Soup, Sandwich
Coffee ......25c
We serve Breakfast, Dinner
and Supper. Lunches in be-
tween. Open from 7 a. m.
to 7:45 p. m., week days
only.

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1+ t r
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Vj $

7'

Open the Door of Wealth

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)Jl,~jg-/Telif twooiensj

I

Fashion offers a becoming color
for every type this season and
we offer the newest fashions in,
their newest colors.

Sensible,

warm, sturdy and

At

F

wearable, the light woolens of
this season's lsports dress is a
dress of distinction. Trim, well-
tailored, with individual touches
that are new. In all the most

Open the door of greater opportunity by

accumulating money.

Create opportunities

for yourself in later years by saving now.
Men of wealth are looking for men with
money sense. Cultivate that sense by prac-

You will likewise f
delicatessen departme
interesting and con
for a hurried lunch fo
hike, or picnic.

"A

Potato
beans,
boiled
coffee,
pint.

salad, cold slaw
spaghetti, m
ham, pickles,
all by the q2

ind our
nt very
venient
r home,
u, baked
acaroni,
, olives,
uart or
-all set
line of

ticing the art of saving.,

favored colors.

The blouse this year is an im-
portant part of the costume. In
this group you will find many
that can create a costume! Of
rich satin, heavy crepe, plain

H'

Make your Fortune give you the chance
you want.

Plates, Napkins, cups-
to take out.
And finally, a full
baked goods.

e t

Rolls and Pastries by the
dozen or hundred dozen.
We cater to the home, fra-
ternities and sororities. Prices
will interest.

I

and printed velvet.

ANN ARDOR SAVINGS DANK

Brisk fall days, bridge, teas, luncheons, football, and syncopated
rhythm. You will need the smartest of sports frocks, snug little
felt hats, velvet frocks for afternoon, and chiffon party frocks.

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