100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 06, 1928 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T H E

MICHIGAN

DAILY

RATURDAY_ C)C';TC)lARR. R 199A

uTH E- aa-v ax a em. 1 l1" L LY 1. LL '

. vrs, ts, o, lv a

e mirhigait ont-Ill

I

'ublished every morning except Monday
ing the University year by the Board in
trol of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
ociation.
he Associated Press is exclusively en-
d to the use for republication of all news
patches credited to it or not otherwise
lited in this paper and Vie local news pub-
ied herein.
entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
higan, as second class matter. Special rate
postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
ster General.
ubscription by carrier, $4.0o; by mail,
S o.
)ffices:Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
"d Street.
nones: Editorial, 4925; Busines, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
KENNETH G. PATRICK
itor... ................... Paul . Kern
y Editor. ....Nelson J. Smith
ws Editor ..... ........Richard C. Kurvink
rts Editor.. ..........Morris Quinn
men's Editor ......Sylvia S. Stone
tor Michigan Weekly.-.. J. Stewart _Hooker
isic and Drama.............R. L. Askren
istant City Editor......Lawrence R. Klein
Night Editors
.rence N. Edelson Charles S. Monroe
eph E. Howell Pierce Rosenberg
nald J. Kline George E. Simons
George C. Tilley
_ Reporters

for their work. Even an hour a
year as a bare minimum would
have a salutary effect in bringing
attendance at rehearsals and pub-
lic appearance to the highest pos-;
sible level; and has a University
which gives scholastic credit for
courses in Roman band instru-
ments and Greek vases any right
to refuse it to students who are
gaining something practical and
educational?
Then the view which regards the
band as a competing activity is a
false one. It is an educational
activity pure and simple-surely
as educational as a course in crea-
tive listening-and as such there
seems to be no reasonable basis
for excluding freshmen from its
ranks. Carrying the argument
back to our previous analogy we
have only to point out that Presi-
dent Little actually URGES fresh-
men men to join the R. O. T. C.
Let no one misunderstand-this
is not to be construed as an attack
on the R. O. T. C.. as a non-mili-
tary organization. It is, however,
a plea for the band-a plea that
the band be given at least half a
chance to make good. Never has
a group displayed a finer spirit in
the face of adversity-the times
they have given up trips in order
to have better appearing uniforms;
the times that men have come
back to the band after being for-
ced into other activities during
their freshmen year are too num-
erous to mention here. It is about
time-and high time-that the
University authorities took some
recognition of this musical activity
and put it on a par with similar
activities at other Western Con-
ference universities. If such action
is not taken it is only safe'to pre-
dict that Michigan's fighting band
has not many years to survive as
the outstanding musical organiza-
tion that it now is.
0
A HOLIDAY-
TO LAUGH AND PLAY

I

aul &. Adams
[orris Alexander
:sther Anderson
A. Askren
ertram Askwith
'enelon Boesche
oulse TBehymer
krthur Bernstein"
sabel Charles
. R. Chubb
aura Codling
crank E?. Cooper
[elen Domine
dward Efroymson
ouglas Edwards
'alborg Egeland
obert J. Feldman
[arjorieFollmer -
scar Fuss
William Gentry
om Gillett
,awrence Hartwig
flis Jones
ichard Tung
harles R. Kaufman

Ruth Kelsey
Donald E. Layman
C. A. Lewis
Leon Lyle
Marian MacDonald
Henry Merry"
N. S. Pickard
William Post
Victor Rabinowitz
Tohn T. Russ
Harold Saperstein
Rachel Shearer
Howard Simon
Robert L. Sloss
Arthur R. Strubel
Beth Valentine
Gurney Williams
Walter 'Wilds
Edward Weinman
Robert Woodroofe
Toseph A. Russell
Cadwell Swanson
A. Stewart
Edward L. Warner Jr.
Cleland Wyllie

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
EDWARD L- HULSE
Assistant Manager-RAYMOND WACHTER
Department Managers
Aderisng. ..........'.Alex K. Scherer
Advertising... ......... A. James Jordan
Advertising.............Carl W. Hammer
Service............Herbert l~. Varnum
Circulation.... ........George S. Bradley
Accounts............Lawrence E. Walkley
Publications............... Ray M. Hofelich

r
i
i
r
r
t

rving Binzer
ary Chase
anette Dale
'ernor Davis
[elen Geer
.asper Halverson
gne i
ack Horwitch

Assistants
AGeorge R. Hamilton
Dix Humphrey
Bernard Larson
Leonard Littlejohn
Carl Schemm
Robert Scoville

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1928
Night Editor-GEORGE C. TILLEY
WELCOME
Welcome Ohio Wesleyan!
Michigan is glad to act as host
today to the school at which
its famous mentor, returning
to active coaching on this oc-
casion after a lapse of a year,
first undertook his duties as an
athletic director. It is hoped
that Michigan and, Ohio Wes-
leyan will continue this year
and in the future the friendly
competitive spirit that was
started at the opening game of
the 1927 grid season.

Already, as in the past, a new
Freshman class is voicing the
question: "Why is not the Friday
after Thanksgiving day a Univer-
sity holiday?" And Sophomores
and upperclassmen who have un-
dergone the general inactivity of
the day between the. holiday and
the ensuing week-end can only re-
peat the lyric, and devise ways to
avoid classes and 'yet escape the
three-bolt penalty.
The lone Friday classes between
Wednesday artd Monday !compli-
cates maters for both students and
faculty members. Homesick fresh-
men, lovesick upperclassmen, and
holiday-sick people from both
groups find the irksome Friday
one in which it is hard to accom-
plish anything. The faculty finds
it hard to teach the young idea,
and classes decimated. The day is
trying on both groups.
The question of Saturday classes
arises. Those who have experi-
enced Saturday classes after a
Thanksgiving holiday know that
few beside residents of Los Angeles,
London, and Timbuctoo come to
class.
There is much to be said on the
other side; arguments that the
long week-end does not augur for
a brilliant Monday following and
that the day is needed to fill in the
I University requirements are strong.-
It would, however, be a glorious
experiment to try the setting aside
of the "Thanksgiving" Friday as a
holiday. To many students, it is
one anyway. A few beloved instruc-1
tors and professors make it one.1
0- t

CAMPUS OPINION
Annonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded =as
confidential upon request. Lettersepub.
lished should not be construed as ex-
pressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily.
SMITH FOR PRESIDENT
To the Editor:
Unlimited optimism and su-
preme confidence of victory is what
we expect to find in both political
camps a month before election day.
It is not particularly surprising,
therefore, to find both Smith and
Hoover men laying claim to the
electoral votes of New England, the
middle west, and the far west,
Some .of their surveys, of course,
are amusing, such as Hoover opti-
mism in New York and Smith op-
timism in Kansas, and some, such
as the recent report of mounting
Hoover sentiment in the solid
south, are startling and signifi-
cant.
Since we know from past experi-
ence that only one candidate can
win the election, it follows that
the protagonists of the other must
be doing a lot of empty ballyhoo-
ing. Meanwhile the public classi-
fies all preliminary prophecies
from campaign headquarters as
bunk of a purity approaching ivory
soap.
With reason, therefore, we ply
the salt shaker before swallowing
Republican tales of wholesale
Democratic defection in the south,
but there can be no doubt that a
defection exists in quantities large
enough to produce several ripples
and a couple of good-sized waves
in the calm political waters of the
south for the first time in more
than fifty years.
Its significance lies not in the
possible effect on the vote of the
electoral college, for there is little
fear that any state of the solid
south excepthKentucky will find its
way into the Hoover column, but
rather in the intolerance that is
piling up Smith opposition. On
the streets, in political gatherings
from the platform, and through
the press, one hears that Smith
is aTwet, that Smith is in the toils
of Tammany. Prohibition is the
Hoover selling point worked over-
time by precinct talkers.
And behind the talk one senses
that Smith is a Catholic. We won-
der it the home of corn liquor and
mint juleps would bolt in any
numbers from Governor Ritchie,
to whose dampness Smith can't
hold a candle, had the Democrats
made him their standard bearer.
It may be relevant, also, that the
stamping ground of southern
baptistry, southern methodism,
and other forms of theological
bigotry boasts two such institu-
tions as the Ku Klux Klan, of
slightly anti-Roman leanings, and
Senator Heflin, who looks under
his bed every night half expecting
to surprise the Pope.
Aside from all 'histrionics on re-
ligious toleration for which this
country has bled, this saying one
thing because the other can be im-
plied without hurting consciences,
is un-American. This monster of
hypocrisy lives in the stagnant re-
cesses of a whispering campaign,
fed by bigots who stubbornly re-
fuse to let it be dragged into the
sunlight.

Governor Smith is the most en-
thusiastic, the most representa-
tive, the most thoroughly Ameri-
can American on the public stage
today. He has tried to drag the
monster into the open where it
would lose its terrors. When whis-
pers were heard that Smith was a
Catholic, it was the part of Smith's
sincerity, straightforwardness, and,'
strategy to shout, "I'm a Catholic."
Thinking people looked at each
other and said, "That's so; why
not?"
When it was whispered Smith's
a wet, he shouted, "I'm a wet." He
heralds a new era of straightfor-
wardness in politics. Without cir-
cumlocution, ?without fvague Ian-
guage and double meanings he has
told the people so that every one
cane understand it where and how
he stands on religion, prohibition,
farm relief, water power, water
vays, and tariff. No one has
challenged his utterances because
they stand unimpeachable.
John Roach Straton, on the
>ther hand, has yet to debate
Smith on his record as a Tammany+
assemblyman. Hoover has yet to
show how the Teapot Dome fits
nto his party's scheme of responsi-
bility:, New YoRAilin r1.

TONIGHT: At the Whitney
theatre, at 8:15 o'clock, the
Provincetown Players present
"In Abraham's Bosom."
HALF-MEASURES
Valentine Windt, with the co-
operation of some hundred mem-
bers of play production and acting
classes in the University, has been
making, in the past weeks, an at-
tempt to renovate the old Uni-
versity Hall auditorium for the
purposes of a labratory theater.
Such improvements as the clean-
ing and painting of the' walls, the
repairing of the lighting equip-
ment, and the improvement of the
dressing rooms, has been done. .
It is understood that classes in
play production, stagecraft, make
up, and other fields pertaining to
the theatre, are being conducted;
and further that a campaign will
be launched to secure funds for the
continuation of this laudable work.
The striking feature of this news
is the fact that a little more than'
a hundred students are earnestly
striving to do experimental work
in the theatre. It reveals, at least,
that interest in this highly impor-
tant field of contemporary art, is
keenly alive at Michigan.
The only trouble with the pro-
ceedure which is being adopted, is
that it is merely a half-measure.
The fact must be faced that at the
present time Michigan is without
an adequate theatre either for ex-
perimental purposes, or for the
production of the work of mature
playwrites. Certainly, University'
Hall auditorium, however much it
may be improved, cannot offer a
satisfactory solution of the prob-
lem. What is necessary is a co-
ordinating of the interests of all
organizations interested in drama-
tics. Only such cooperation will
be sufficient to bring about a cam-
pus theatre.
P. L. A.
* * *
AT THE SHUBERT LAFAYETTE
One of the big events in the De-.
troit theatre business is the ar-
rival of George Arliss. Last year
it was "Old English" he brought
with him. This time, opening Sun-
day night at the Cass theatre for
a run of just one week, he is bring-
ing his interpretation of "The Mer-
chant of Venice."
It usually takes a pretty big
name to carry a Shakespearian
production to financial success.
Arliss has that of course. But his
treatment of the part of old shy-
lock has for a long time been the
talk of New York and that, com- I
bined with the splendid production
Winthrop Ames gives, his shows,
should make an important event
foi the Detroit theatre business.
Arliss' career has its significance.
Beginning as a "super" in London
stock, he did a long term with com-
panies touring the provinces. When
he finally got a engagement in
London he fell under the influence
of Mrs. Patrick Campbell and
much to his surprise found himself
in this country making quite a
success. After playing some time
with Mrs. Campbell he played
with Blanche Bates in "The Darl-
ing of the Gods." He was with Mrs.
Fiske, thereafter, until in Molnar's
"The Devil" he got his first star-
ring part. More recently memor-
able are his Rajah of Rukh in
"The Green Goddess," his Disraeli,
and his "Old English."
With Mr. Arliss is Frieda Ines-

court in the role of Portia. Play-
ing the leading roles in such plays
as Phillip Barry's "You ;and I,"
Galsworthy's "Windows" and "Es-
cape," and featured in Pinero's all-
star revival of "Trelawny of the
Wells," Miss Inescourt is one of
the outstanding of the younger
actresses and should make an ad-
nirable foil for the old Jew.
R. L. A.
* * *
"IN ABRAHAM'S BOSOM,"
A Review by R. Leslie Askren
In Abraham McCranie's bosom
there burned a half mad desire to
arry the negro people-his own
people-out of the superstition
,nd darkness traditional with the
darky" and educate them to lead-
,rship among men. His white'
>lood, a heritage from Col. Mc-
'ranie, drives him and tortures
im to fulfill the dreams his twist-
d mind paints for him, but the
lark blood drags him down, against'
imself, making him kin with the'
inging, boozing gang on the plan-
ation. The drama created by the
~ ...~ i £.-- - -

$1.50

$2.00

f

Music And Drama

i

AT THE

UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Oct. 10

ROSA PO N S E L L E, Re-
nowned Operatic Dramatic So-
prano.
Amelita GALLI-CURCI, Dis-
tinguished Coloratura Soprano

Jan. 18 ROLAND
Tenor.
Jan. 24 PRAGUE
CHORUS,
Conductor

HAYES, Negro
TEACHERS
Metod Dolezil,

Oct. 22

A LIMITED NUMBER OF TICKETS FOR
INDIVIDUAL CONCERTS WILL PROB-
ABLY REMAIN FOR SALE BEGINNING

_ __

Feb. 13

Nov. 12

VLADMIR

HOROWITZ,

S E RGE I; RACHMANI-
NOFF, Pianist
YELLY D'ARANYI Violin-
ist

Soloist with the Detroit Orches-

Feb. 20

tra.

Nov. 23

FLONZALEY

STRING

QUARTET, Farewell Season

SIMON lI

Monday, October 8

Mar. 11 DETROIT SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA, ALFRED
HERTZ, Conductor of the San
Francisco Orchestra, Guest Can-
ductor.

--8:30 A.M.

Dec. 13

FRITZ
King

KREISLER,

Violin

$3.00

A FEW SEASON TICKETS STILL ON SALE
Subscribe to The Michigan Daily Want Ads Pay

1 A~

ABOUT TIME
We have an R. 0. T. C. which
drills and marches and dresses in
iniform and never' accomplishes
anything for the benefit of the
Jniversity as a whole. We have
a band which drills and plays and
'ehearses and dresses in uniforn
nd which forms the center of all
ampus enthusiasm' for athletic
earns, radio programs, prep meet-
ngs, etc.
The members of the R. 0. T. C.
eceive one full hour's credit for
heir work and infinite praise
rom such gentleman as President
;larence Cook Little for the fine
raining they get. The members
f the banc receive little else than
chance to make martyrs of them-

h
n
I
c

NII
.7-77:

iwl

yh

Ives for their dear
ater. The members
C. are paid during
id senior year. The
.e band receive- an
ip or two during the:
r their pains.

old alma
of the -R. 0.
their junior
members of
economical
same period

Persons looking at the situation
fairly are likely to feel that it is
unbalanced-tiniat somewhere there
has been/an injustice done. Per-
ons in, general will be hesitant
about criticising the R. 0. T. C.,
ind there is no reason why they
hould be criticised. Why the'
)and should be so completely ig-
iored in the manner of reward,
zowever, is rather a different
hing--a thing which is puzzling to
hose who take an interest in the
rganization. When anyone ex-
ects something for nothing he is
ikely to be disappointed, and if
he University is ever disappointed
: its band it will be because noth-
ng has been given.

CHORAL UNION CONCERTS
Hailing this year's series of con-
certs as the semi-centenary an-
niversary series, the University
musical society is offering music
lovers here a group of artists who
together constitute what is one of
the finest series of concerts ever
presented to! one city in one year.
Among the singers who will ap-
pear on the programs are included
Rosa Ponselle, Amelita Galli-Cur-
ci, and Roland Hayes. Two out-
standing pianists of the present
day, Vladimir Horowitz and Sergei
Rachmaninoff add further weight
to the events. For added variety
in the series, Fritz Kreisler and
Yelli D'Aranyi, famed violinists,
will appear. Among the. other
bookings are the Flonzaley quar-
tet and the Prague teachers' chorus.
An old favorite with local audi-
ences, the Detroit symphony or-
chestra, with Alfred Hertz as the
guest leader for the occasion, will
close the 1928-29 choral union
series.
Such an array of talent is un-
umni lfnr A. iaa n-n,.r aria

HAT'S the telephone"Hello"in Madrid. In London, it's"Are
you there?" But in many foreign countries, Americans find a
universal language in the telephone salutations. It's good old
"Hello"-.a subtle tribute to the fact that the telephone is an
American invention.
And so it is with elevator service. Even though they say "Diga"
in Spain, the architects of the magnificent new Madrid Telephone
Building unhesitatingly said "Otis" because Spain demanded the
last word in elevators. You will find in Madrid the same type of Sig.,
nal Control Elevators that are now installed in those monumental
telephone buildings in America, in New York, Cleveland, St. Louis

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan