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October 06, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PG'

EW POLICY ADOPTED
AORICL BOARD

DAILY EDITOR ESTIMATES SMITH'S STRENGTH IN ELECTORAL VOTES

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To Take Over All Intercollegiate
Debating and Oratorical
Contests Here
COMMITTEES APPOINTED
The oratorical board embarks on
a new program of expansion at the
first meeting of the year when
committees were appointed by
Robert E. Gressner, '29, president.
Aside from local public speak-
ing contests which heretofore
have been conducted by the board,
it will this year assume active con-
trol of all intercollegiate debating
and oratorical events with the ex-
ception of picking and coaching
the contestants. The board also
intends to cooperate more actively
with the four public speaking or-
ganizations: Adelphi, Alpha Nu,
Athena, and Portia.
Following are committees which
will serve during the ensuing year:
Social committee, Earl Gremel, '29,
chairman; Walter K. Schmidt, Jr.,
'29, Benjamin Marcus, '29L, Miss
Helen M. McComb, '29Ed, Miss Nau-
rene Jones, '29.
Local contests: Russell M. San-
derson, '29, chairman; Lawrence
Walkley, '30, and Earl Gremel, '29.
Committee on extension of
board's activities: John Webster,
'30P, chairman, Russell M. Sander-
son, '29, Miss Helen McComb, '29,
and Miss Naurene Jones, '29.

(Continued from Page 1)
be two of the group will vote for
Hoover this year.
In addition there are three other
southern states, Kentucky, Ten-
nessee and Oklahoma, which are'
normally Democratic. Kentucky'
has twice voted the Repubican
party since 1880 and Tennessee
and Oklahoma once each.
Hoover already appears the win-
ner in Oklahoma, which went to
Harding in 1924, and he may be
of sufficient strength to swing both
Kentucky and,' Tennessee to his
support. But altogether these are
35 electoral votes which may have
a very deciding nature in the final
count.
Considering the results of the
past four presidential elections
only, there are 14 other states em-
bodying a total of 103 electoral
votes which have voted for the
Republican leader twice and the
Democratic nominee twice.
These states are: Ohio, North
Dakota, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho,
Missouri, Montana, Nebraska,' Ne -
vada, New Hampshire, New Mex-
ico, Wyoming, Kansas and Mary-
land.
In order to carry the country,
Smith will need 266 votes in the
electoral college. To swing that
support, he must carry New York
with 45 votes; the ten sou}hern
states which are staunchly ;-
cratic and control 114 votes; all of
the 14 states with 103 votes which
have twice swung to the Demo-
cratic columns in the past 16 years,
and one of the three southern.
states which is usually Democratic
but has departed from the party
standard on at least one occasion.,
The above statistics, however,
are not' the only factors to be con-

sidered. They show only what has
happened and fail to take into
consideration other factors such
as' prohibition and religion, which
are bound to influence the final
outcome.
In the first place, Delaware, New
Jersey, New York, Rhode Island

group of states swing to Smith or
should he (and it is quite possible)
carry the Catholic centers of Mas-
sachusetts and Rhode Island, then
there will be other totals which
must be considered in the possibil-'
ities.
Massachusetts controls 18 votes
in the electoral college and Rhode
Island 5, making 23 votes which
may go to Smith. Then Delawaref
with 3, New Jersey with 14, andI
Connecticut with 7, make anotherl

24 which added to the 23 mention-
ed just above give Smith a possible
gain of forty-seven votes not in-
cluded in the first estimate of his
strength.
These factors point to the fact
that Smith may very possibly poll
as high as 310 votes in the electo-
ral college but also that if he is to
win his greatest support must
come from the 14 "doubtful" west-
ern states and that failing to carry
these states his cause is lost.

Scranton, Pocahontas
Kentucky and West Virginia Coal
Solvay and Gas Coke

CORNWELL COAL - COKE

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Exclusive First
Run Attractions
at Popular
Prices.

ARCADE

Popular Prices
Mats. 10c, 20c
Evenings
I10c, 20c, 30c

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This business has been growing ever
since it was established. The secret-
"giving absolute satisfaction to our
customers." We believe it pays to do
business in a friendly way. If you
think so too, let's get together.

If1'il, J F r
Herbert Hoover
strong R e p u b1i c a n candidate
against whom Alfred E. Smith will
have to pile up 266 electoral votes,
to become the next president of
the United States.
and Connecticut are "wet" states
and for the most part Republican,
but there is every possibility that
Smith may carry one or several,
of the group. Pennsylvania is also
preponderately "wet" but so defi-
nitely Republican that it is re-
garded almost as a certainty that
it will vote for Hoover.
Should the majority of thisl'

TODAY ONLY

JAMES OLIVER CURWOOD'S
DRAMATIC MASTERPIECE
I OBE

We are bringing this picture back in honor of the famous
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CORN WELL COAL - COKE
OFFICE, CORNWELL BLOCK
Phones, Office : 4451-4552 Yard Office : 5152
Read the Class ified Ads

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Original Production
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The Season's Dramatic Sensation
Run of Over 200 Performances in New Yorki
Awarded the Pulitzer Prize for "the most original American play
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Intimate glimpses of .the backstage
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There are few men with so small
an income that they cannot afford
to lay aside a part of it for the
future.
The earning days of Youth are
soon ended, and leisure and comfort
1 1 7 1 ,

-ON THE STAGE-

JIM'KY

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Late Star of the Greenwich Village Follies
with

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