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December 01, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

JRDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1928

THE MIC.HI GA.N.

DA I L Y

as

MUSEUM Of IgzoOGY GIVEN CREDIT FOR TEXAS FRATENITIES
ZEPPELIN FLIGHT
ISM DIVIDED IN SEVEN, VOTE AGAINSTAZING

CLUB DISPLAYS POLISH HANDIWORK IFrench Actor Will WILL INTERVIEW_
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IIIAIN RUMUH UNI1Y

TRAITS OF ANIMALS EXAMINED
BY INVESTIGATORS OF
MAMMALSj
GAIGE DIRECTS DIVISION
Much Of Work Is Carried On In
Two Experimental
Laboratories
One of the oldest and certainly
the largest division of the present
University Museums'is the Museum
of zoology. In 1913 the Museum of
zoology was entirely divorced from
the department of zoology and es-
tablished as an entirely separate
unit.
It comprises today seven large
divisions, reptiles and amphibians,
fishes, mollusks, crustacians, birds,
mammals, insects, and two sub-di-
visions, parasitic worms, and pro-
tozoa. Mr. Frederick M. Gaige,
assistant director of the Museum
of zoology is directly in charge,
under the general supervision of
Alexander G. Ruthven, who is both
director of the University Museums
and director of the Museum .o
zoology.
One of the most interesting di-
vision in the zoology museum is
the mamal division which, under
the leadership of Dr. L. R. Dice,
curator, investigates in detail all
those animals which suckle their
young, are covered entirely or
partly with fur, and are warm
blooded.
Harris Is Associate
Connected with Dr. Dice in this
division is W. P. Harris, Jr., of De-
troit, honorary associate curator,r
who is especially interested in in-Y
vestigation of squirrels of the Ori-
ent, and a number of graduate stu-
dents working under fellowships1
or part tim, cataloguing, measur-
ing, breeding, feeding, etc. the vari-t
ous animals which the division isl
interested in.
The work is done on the third
floor of the University Museum int
two experimental laboratories, a
skin, a bone room, a preparationI
room, office, library, and four re-
search rooms. It is expected that
the University will build an ani-
mal house where the live animalst
o 0
EDITOR'S NOTEf
This is the second of a series
of articles being published by i
1The Daily illustrative of the 11-
work now being conducted in I
the University Museum.t
0 0 1
may be bred, in order that the
rooms now utilized for that pur-
'ose may be used for other re-
search work. Dr.dClarenceeCook:
Little utilizes one of the rooms of
the mammal division for a labor-
atory to investigate the problems
of the breeds of mice which he is
interested in.
Both live and dead specimens
are used in this work. Each dead
specimen is skinned, wired and
labeled as to locality, sex, date of
capture, and a series of body meas-
urements..
They thus may be compared as
to color and general development
In the various seasons. The whole I
aim is to obtain a large enough
collection which will reveal the
basis for variability of animals in
the same localities and variability
from locality to locality, such as
animals on the plains and animals
in the mountains. Through these
statistics it is hoped that workable
theories covering variability of all i
the .species of mammals may be
formulated, including, of course,
man.
Study Squirrels
A great deal of the work of the
mammals division is concentrated
on the study of the breeding of
live mamnals. Most of the work
is done with species of mice, deer-

mice, harvest-mice, reo-back mice,
pocket-mice, kangaroo- rats, wood-
rats.
Also the habits and pecularities
of squirrels are studied. The aims
in the breeding of these specimens
is to obtain larger collections and
to determine whether the differ-
ences between specimens and
species is due to hereditary or en-
vironmental reasons. So far it has
been determined that the funda-
mental differences persist in the
laboratory in spite of similarity of
environment and food. At a later
time the diet and conditions will
be changed. from species to species
and specimen to specimen in an

TEXAS-In answer to a letter,'
sent by the Dean of students to the
thirty-one fraternities at the Uni-
versity of Texas, twenty-five ans-
wered in favor of abolishing their
policies of hazing neophytes and
freshmen. Only one fraternity was!
not in favor of forgetting its, for-
mer practice.
The five unaccounted for, failed'
to make their decisions known. The
request for the present policies of
these organizations, as regards
hazing, came as a result of the
death of a student who succumbed'
while crawling between two elec-'
trically charged bed springs.
"'he elimination of all "horse-
play" was very unanimously sup-
ported, although many expressed
themselves as being in favor of
paddling their pledges, especially
on days directly preceding athletic
contests. The elimination of all
dangerous practices was seen un-
necessary by several groups, for the
reason that their ceremonies con-
tained no harmful or injurious pro-
ceedings and were strictly in con-
formance with all regulations laidl
down by their respective national
offices, which forbade all practices
of brutality.
CLASS HASDIFFICULTIES
MINNESOTA.-The peak of stu-
dent industry was reached here
recently when a French instruc-
tor announced in French that the
students could go on reading at
sight or be excused from class.
The class remained silent, so the
surprised instructor took the si-
lence to indicate that they pre-
ferred to stay and recite, and the
class was kept to the end of the

Maurice Chevalier, French mati-
nee idol, arrived in this country re-
cently to play the leading role for
the Famous Players-Lasky corpor-
ation in "The Flea Market," one of
the short stories in "The Innocents
of Paris," a volume of short stories
written by Prof. E. C. Andrews of
the English department of Ohio
State university.
Chevalier has proceeded to Holly-
wood where camera work on the
story has already begun. The pic-
ture will be in sound as Chevalier
not only possesses a rich speaking
voice, but sings in both English and
French. The picture will be direc-
ted by H.. D'Abbadie D'Arrast, a
friend of Chevalier.
The role which the French star
will play is that of handsome, Vil-
lon-like Marcel Corrozet.

Pictured above is one of the dis- Literary Circle, which opens at 10
plays which will be shown in the o'clock this morning. This display
first annual bazaar of the Polonia is of Polish handiwork.

- "_ _

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Dr. Ludwig Duerr
Builder' of the Graf. Zeppelin, is
givenmuch credit for its successful
trans-Atlantic flight.
attempt to determine what are the
most important factors that deter-
mine variations.
Specimens are also cross-bred so
that attempts may be made to de-,

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IF YOU WANT A
FINE HOME-
COOKED M E A L
AND AN EXCEL-
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CHOOSE FROM,
STOP AT THE
WOLVERINE
RESTAURANT
329 S. MAIN ST.
QUICK AND COURTEOUS
SERVICE GUARANTEED
"The Pride of Ann Arbor"
Radio Music Private Booth

.

.

i

termine the reasons for the na- hour. The class was one in French
tive characteristics of wild animals, pronunciation and a survey taken
Long tailed animals and short tail- later revealed that the students did
Sanima are crossed, as are lighnot know what the instructor had
and dark animals. The result of
these experiments so far have re- said.
vealed that divisions of one species NORTHWESTERN.-Loving cups
will readily cross, but two separ- were presented to 59 freshmen stu-
ate species will not cross. dents at Northwestern university
In connection with the work in recently in cognizance of their
the mammal division a library con- high record in scholarship. Thel
taining pamphlets describing sim- cups were presented by President
ilar work in other institutions is Walter Dill Scott before Univer-
maintained so that the research sity hall.
workers may correlate their work. - sity hal_
In order that the deductions may
be entirelyraccurate the live speci- -AR AD E
mens are raised to a uniform age, X ,-T HEAT RE-E1.
and are all killed at the same
time, in May. They are all, then,i Today Only
uniformly measured and stretched,
and the color of the hair is an- 100 Big Lafs
-

1

hs

2v.

:

FEDERAL
Good Things to Eat
and Christmas
Are Two
Inseparable
Thoughts
The Spirit of Christmas
goes on and on, year after
year, century after century,
never changing.
Appetites, however, do
change, and so we of the
Federal are busy at this
particular season each year,
revamping uor entire line of
sweets, in a way to satisfy
that craving. for something
different which more and
more each year seems to be
a part of Christmas.
Whether for use at the
table, in the gift package, or
on the Christmas tree, you
will find the following pleas-
ingly appropriate:
ANISE STARS
PEPER NUTS
SPRINGLES
LEBGUCHEN
SCHNITZBROD
HONEY COOKIES
DELICIOUS FRUIT
CAKE
SMALL SIZE DINNER
ROLLS
PARKERHOUSE OR
FINGER BUNS
FRUIT AND NUT
FILLED COFFEE
!'N'A VT" 'A XT1

I~o :?4IIH4h5m I

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A Big Time
Comedy of A
Small Town
Romance
with
MARY ASTOR
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LOUISE FAZENDA

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In Addition
Charlie Chafe Comedy

I.

News

6 _ t
.

-4

STARTING-TOMORROW
This theater again crashes into
the front with a spectacular ar-
ray of attractions for the first
week of
JOY MONTH
Look 'Em Over!

L

- the
YOVusc

i
k

Sunday Only
"OLD IRONSIDES"
Monday Only
Emil Jannings inI
«VARIETY"
_r.uesday Only
"THe SHOWDOWN"
Wednesday Only
ftkbrd'Dix -in
"THE QUARTERBACK"
Thursday Only

Remington-Rand
Business Service
218 E. Liberty Street
Ann Arbor, Mich.

WARITER'S cramp may sound
like a joke to some, butto the student
who has spent several long hours
writing a thesis or report by hand, it
looms as a very real malady.
Eliminate the drudgery and slowness
of writing by hand--get a Remington
Portable. Your work will be neater
and you'll get it done far more quickly.

: " me ffortd

I

I wwmm i "puqMTIL g twi # %E t l EU E ERUM

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