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December 01, 1928 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UA CE TO

THE- MIS CAN

DAILY

THE MIOH4GAN flATLY

_, T_._ ._ _._ _, -_..,,

STUDENT VOLUNTEERS BLIND STUDENT IS ELECTED
AS CLASS HEAD AT CI
HEAR OLD MISSIONARY,
IN OPENING M EETING *.:................................

HICAGO

any further discussion of the naval COOLIDGE FAMILY enjoying the
disarmament question by the3an attractive
BL I PAF League of Nations, the government RESTS IN VIRGINIA There was
would consider viting the Frenchdge, moreov
and American governments to par- B t doc e P ess) some quail sh
NA'V AL UDISRMAIMEI ticipate in a conference with Great SWANNANOA CLUB, Near Way- here, althoug
Britain insofar as the problem con- nesboro, Va., Nov. 30.-After an ac- were definite
(By Associated Press) cerns the three countries. tive Thanksgiving, President and The presid
LONDON, Nov. 30.-Prime Minis- In reply the premier said that Mrs. Coolidge settled down today returned to
ter Baldwin and his government his government was considering to get the most of the rest and evening for
have under consideration what the steps that could usefully be recreation that their country resi- after a day in
steps can be taken to promote taken for further naval limitations. dence at Swannanoa affords, they attendee
agreement on further limitation of "I doubt whether thel speclit Neither arranged for any par- I luncheon wit
naval armaments. expedient proposed by my honor- ticular engagements today andIpresident of
Mr. Baldwin was asked in the able and gallant friend would be Saturday. While the president en- and watched
house of commons by Sir Freder- likely to attain the object which gages in some clay pigeon shocting, ginia-North
ick Hall whether as preliminary to he evidently has in view." Mrs. Coolidge looked forward to game.

DR. A. PTETERS, OF WESTERN
SEMINARY, SPEAKS AT
FIRST SESSION
MOL WELCOMES MEMBERSI
Mrs. Helen Scott And Dr. C. H. Haas
To Address Morning Sections
At 9:15 O'Clock
Dr. A. Pieters, for many years a
missionary in Japan, and now a
member on the faculty of the
Western Seminary at Holland,
Michigan, was the principal speak-
er at the opening session of the
annual Student Volunteer Confer-
ence, held last night at Lane hall.
The conference was opened by
the Reverend Samuel S. Harrison,
director of the Wesley Hall Stu-
dent work, who delivered the in-
vocation. Martin J. Mol, '30, presi-
dent of the Student Christian asso-
ciation, delivered the welcome ad-
dress.
Delegates from 15 colleges in the
state attended the opening session.
The convention, which is being
held under the auspices of the Stu-
dent Christian association, is the
eighth annual affair of its kind,
and is made up of students in-
terested in doing religious, educa-
tional or medical work abroad. The
conference will continue today,
when three sessions will be held
and tomorrow, when there will be
two sessions. All sessions are be-
ing held at Lane hall.
The first session today will be-
gin at 9:15 o'clock in the morn-,
ing. The speakers will be Mrs.
Helen E. Scott, who has been doing
educational work abroad for sev-
eral years, Dr. Cyril H. Haas, '04M,
the director of an American hos-
pital in Turkey, and the Reverend
Harrision.
A business meeting will follow
the regular session. The secondl
session will be opened at 2:15 o'clock
in the afternoon, when Dr. E. M.
Dodd, a mission worker in medical
fields will address the meeting on
"Boards of Mission and Enter-
prise."
At 3 o'clock, Dr. Norman A. Wood,
curator of birds of the Zoology
Museum will deliver a lecture on
China. At 6 o'clock tonight, a ban-'
quet will be held, at which for-
eign students will be the principal
speakers.
The evening session will imme-,
diately follow the banquet, and will
be addressed by Dr. Haas and
Floris Vanderstroop.
Subscribe for the Michiganensian
now. It costs only $4.00.

r
,rr
"rr

COSMOPOLITAN OPENING

A

Our First Great JOY MONTH Attraction---And We Mean Great----With Many
More to Come During This Gala Celebration

.,,
..

Herbert F. Geisler (left), blind ber of the editorial staff of the Il-
student now attending the Univer- linois Law Review.
sity of Chicago, has been elected This photograph shows Geisler
by the senior law class as their transcribing his lessons on the
new president. He has maintained Braille typewriter for the blind
a straight "A" average throughout from the dictation given to him by
his entire law course and is a mem- Jacob Geffs.
Bull Fights In Mexico Make No Money,
So Law Against Them Is Now Observed

Two Champions in the Realm f
of extraordinary Cinema Art.,

Bullfights, bootlegged or other-
wise, are practically unknown in
Mexico now.r
There has not been a legal bull- !
fight in Oaxaca City or State forj
about three quarters of a century,1
and the people have become so in-
different to, bullfighting, and so
ignorant of it, that efforts to vio-
late the law have practically ceased.
Oaxaca is the only city in Mex-
ico without a bullring. The State
is the only one in the Republic
with a law prohibiting bullfighting.
Benito Juarez, the George Wash-
ington of Mexico, had that law
'passed when he was Governor of
Oaxaca, his native state, about
eighty years ago. He hated bull-
fighting and he enforced the law.
Now generations grew up which
did not miss bullfights because they
had neveir seen any. It was as
natural to them not to have bull-
fights as it was natural to Mexicans
of other states to have bullfights.
Sometimes there were clandes-
tine performances. But even the
effort has almost stopped. Of all

stale, flat, and unprofitable enter-
prises a secret bullfight came near
heading the list. The bullfight
bootleggers ? have just about gone
out of business simply because the
Oaxaca public is uninterested in
their wares. Everywhere else in
Mexico the sport is lawful and
flourishing.
Detroit Theaters
CASS THEATRE
Prices: Evenings $1 to $2.50

its

i

Matinee
"The

Saturday-75c to $1.50
Silent House"

SHUBERT
LAFAYETTE
"TIDE GRAND STREET
FOLLIES"
with
Albert Carroll
Nights, 50e-$2.50; Thur. Mat.
50e-$1.50; Sat. Mat., 50c -$2.00

I

11

Starring Alone
They're Wonderful
Imagine Them
TOGETHER!
ACAA
50 Stars Are in This
Picture-
DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS
CHARLIE CHAPLIN
HAROLD LLOYD
NORMA TALMADGE
JOHN GILBERT and
~ Others Act Themselves.
Briefette
A laugh; a tear-at the expense
Hollywood and its shame! All love isi
-Mbunk-only most of it
POLIC:
2:0O-3:35-35c, l0c
:00-8:40-0c, 101
,Startling the Mass of Humanity
More Sensationally Than the Mem- X
corable hit of 1928-
"OUR DANCING DAUGHTERS"
--Surprise after Surprise Awaits Your
Most Futuristic Thougts.-

'"Maiestie Amonintment ____

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