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November 25, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-11-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 25,

192 .

THE. MCI

DA LY

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NR L 10 ELOS ANGELES INVENTOR DEVISES HUGE PARACHUTE 1UAmerican Warcraft I
NEWBERR L HAIL TO TO LOWER ENTIRE AIRPLANE SAFELY TO GROUNDILIITIGATll RfIIL A

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REMODELED INTO NE
MUSEUM FOR CLASSICS,

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NEW UNIT EXPECTED TO OPEN
SOON AFTER BEGINNING
OF YEAR
WINTER TO HAVE CHARGE
Material Gathered On Expeditions
To Be Put On Display In
Renovated Building
Organization plans for the new
Museum of classical archaeology
having been approved by the Re-
gents at their meeting Friday, the
work of remodeling Newberry hall
and installing exhibition apparatus
will be begun immediately, and it
is hoped that the museum will be
open for public exhibition soon aft-
er the first of January.
The new museum will be a unit
in the group of University mu-
seums under the directorship of
Dean A. G. Ruthven of administra-
iton. All teaching connected with
the museum of classical archae-
ology, however, will beunder the
supervision of the College of Lit-
erature, Science and the Arts and
the Graduate school. Prof. J. G.
Winter of the Latin department,
will be in charge of the new unit
with the title of Professor of the
Latin language and literature and
Director of the museum of classical
archaeology.
Professor Winter has been em-
powered by the Regents to prepare
a budget, appoint an advisory
board, and select a museum staff
from members of the faculty.
Museum Needed
A classical archaeology museum
has been desired on the campus for
many years as a result of the vast
amount of material which has
come to the University from vari-
ous expeditions. Although New-
berry hall is not an ideal museum
building, it will be a distinct start
which will some day lead to a large
modern museum of classical arch-
aeology, according to Professor
Winter.
Professor Winter hopes to model
the museum as close as possible to
the types of zoology, paleontology,
and other museums in the new
Museum on Washtenaw avenue.
The greater part of the material
which will go in the new museum
will be that unearthed in the Uni-
versity excavations at Karanis,
which are still going on. Undoubt-
edly some of the results obtained
from Professor Leroy Waterman's
expedition in Mesopotamia will be
exhibited, also.
Patent Seekers Set
Record For Petitions

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01 11 1 I1,01Wfil I 1I1LU1 I 8Icc(al pei lT'heDaily)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 24.-One
hundred and twenty-five of the
(By AssocitedTres) United States' mightest warcraft
NEW YORK, Nov. 24.-A theory will roll down the west coast of
that the very efforts taken by offi- South America to Callao and Val-
cers of the British liner Vestris to paraiso next February.
correct the vessel's fatal list in TegetUie ttsfet
reality contributed to her founder- The great Unitec States fleet,
ing has been advanced by Walter commanded by Admiral H. A.
F. Brown, assistant secretary of Wiley, is scheduled to sail from
commerce. Mr. Brown is aiding in Balboa, Canal Zone, after the an-
one of the two federal investiga- nual fleet concentration Feb. 21,
tions. the plans being dependent upon
It is his theory that the pumping dipolmatic exchanges with the
of the starboard water ballast governments over the use of Peru-
tanks in the lowest nart of the ves- vian and Chilean ports.

Given final ground tests, the biggest parachute ever built is prepared for the experiment of lowering
a whole airplane from the sky, in Los Angeles, Cal. T he revolutionary test is under the direction of Heard
McClellan, inventor of the 'chute, which is 85 fee t in diameter. At top, the parachute is being
inflated as a huge crew of men hold it to the ground with a long rope. Below McClellan is shown
inspecting the wooden case in which the parachute will be carried underneath the fuselage of a plane
during the test.

CONGRESS TO DEBATE FARM RELIEF,
BOULDER DAM AT COMING SESSION

(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Ifov. 24.-An
ominous silence foreshadows the
resumption of debate in the senate
on the Swing-Johnson Boulderl
canyon dam bill which lived
through a stubborn filibuster
against it at the last session to
hold its place before the senate as
the next order of business.
Supporters of the legislation,,
however, are taking heart, Senator
King, Democrat, Utah, who joined'
with the Arizona senators last ses-
sion in the successful filibuster
which forestalled any action has
indicated a willingness to let the
bill be brought to a vote.
There are rumors that the report
of the commission of engineers ap-
pointed to study the feasibility of
the Colorado river project will say
that the Boulder canyon dam pro-
posal is feasible from an engineer-
ing standpoint. The commission is
now preparing a report on theI
economic feasibility of the pro-
posal. A digest of the engineers re-j
port is in the hands of President
Coolidge.
Senator Ashurst, Democrat, Ari-
zona, who has led the fight against
the bill, is withholding any word
which might indicate his next step.
He says the next move is up to
Senator Johnson, Republican,uCali-'
fornia, the co-author of the legis-
Expert In Anatomy
To Speak Tomorrow

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lation.
Senator Johnson has been ill at
his home in California but is ex-
pected here by the opening of con-
gress. Under the agreement reach-
ed at the close of the last session,
the bill, which already has passed
the house, comes up on the sec-
ond day of the approaching shortI
term.
A filibuster which would hold
out through the entire short term
seems improbable of success.
Admitting that if the bill comes
to a vote its chances for passage
are "very good," Senator King is
preparing some amendments look-
ing to the development of the up-
per basin. He would make provi-
sions for irrigation and power pro-
jects along the upper reaches of
the Colorado to offer improvements
for states in that territory, iclud-
ing Utah.
"The Boulder canyon dam pro-
ject," he declares, "is out of reach
of Utah foi power and irrigation.
The water of our state is to be
used for practically the sole bene-
fit of California, which furnishes
none of the water. I will propose
amendments to help the upper ba-1
sin states."
Another old acquaintance, dress-
ed in slightly different raiment, is
waiting for the members of con-
gress. It is a farm relief bill,
drafted by Chairman McNary, of
the senate agriculture committee,
and it is to be pressed for a vote
at the approaching short session.
The measure calls for the es-
tablishment of a federal farm
board-but the equalization fee,
the cause of many a legislative
quarrtl, is missing. Senator ic-
Nary, co-author of the twice ve-
toed McNary- Iaugen bill, has
sought to follow the administra-I
tion's ideas on how to help the
farmers.
Senator McNary said that ad-
ministration support of his
measure is certain, and that ex-
perts from the departments of
agriculture and the treasury help-
ed him get it in shape. He believes
that it can be disposed of at the
short session. However, there are

01GT 'OA NAVIATION CONFERENE1
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 24.-Thirty
nations have responded to the in-
vitation of the American govern-
ment to send delegates to the In-
ternational civil Aeronautics con-
ference which will be held here In
December.
In announcing the group of
countries today, the state depart-
ment disclosed that 21 other na-
tions have not yet replied to the
invita'tion. The conference has
been called to commemorate the
twenty-fifth anniversary of the
first airplane flight of the Wright
brothers at Kitty Hawk, N. C.
The thirty countries which have
named delegations are Austria,
Australia, Belgium, Canada, Chile,
China, Costa Rica, Cuba, Czecho-
Slovakia, D e n rid a r k, mFinland,
France, Germany, Great Britian,
Guatemala, Hungary, Irish Free
State, Italy, India, Mexico, Nether-
lands, New Zealand, Norway, Pan-
ama, Persia, Poland, Sweden
Spain, Switzerland and Venezuela.
reports that some of the legisla-
tors are still faithful to their first
love, the equalization fee.

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(B i - Dr. T. Wingate Todd, professor
WASHINGTONov.te 24r-Insof anatomy at Western Reserve
WASHINGTON, Nov. 24.-Inven- University, will opena series of four'
tors seeking patents from the gov- or five addresses to be given this
ernment are setting new records, year by prominent medical scien-
the grand total of patent applica tists sponsored by Alpha Omega
tions reaching 116,951 during the Alpha, honorary medical fraternity,,
last fiscal year. Thomas E. Rob- with a talk on "Intestinal Motility
ertson, commissioner of the patent in Man" at 8 o'clock tomorrow
offices, said today in his annual mnight in Natural Science auditor-
report this was about 3,000 greater ium. His address will be accom-l
than the total in the previous year panied by slides and motion pic-,
and an increase of 17,000 over the tures.
patent applications of 1924. Preceding the talk tomorrow
night, the fall initiation banquet
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA: of the fraternity will be held at 61
The "Cornhusker" football team, o'clock in the Union. Dr. Todd will
ate twice or three times as much be the guest of honor at the ban-'
as the ordinary student, during the quet and many of the alumni and
football season, according to the- local members of the fraternity as
employees of the Temple cafeteria well as the active chapter will be
where they ate their evening meals. present.
Thy did 'not care for cake as During his brief stay in Ann
desert, but consumed large quanti- Arbor, Dr. Todd will be the guest
ties of bread, milk, potatoes, and of Dr. A. S. Warthin, of the path-
ice cream. ology department.
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_ SUNDAY 2 TO 6 WEEK DAYS 2 TO 9
All lovers of fine home building and artfull home
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showing.
Ann Arbor Home Builders, Inc.
F. P. Corry, Pres. S. Schultz, V. P. E. H. Smith, Sec.-Treas.
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CLARK'S TEA ROOM
Try a real home-cooked Dinner
with our tasty Pies and Cakes.
Delicious Salads and Sandwiches

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