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November 25, 1928 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-11-25

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PACE TWO

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

SUNDAY,

NOVEMBER 25, 1928

PRESS~~~~... MEEIN.EN...a..Dleate...AD.FRMR.

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PREISS M ITING IN Rotary Delegate is tUM U
Back From Meet:
: I
Cabot, Sunderland, Shepard, And Dr. Franklin Casper Wagner,
Stalker Talk On "If I Were past professor. in the Engineering
Conducting A Newspaper".ps roesridteEgneng o
W_>__:g. Ns "college and recently president of
RSthe Rose Polytechnic Institute of'
UB E-ELET OFFICERS 1Terre Haute, Indiana, was killed
Thursday when an interurban hiti
"The newspaper is bringing to ; f''r' rithis car which he was driving off'
the individual consciousness the a the campus of the institute. It is
importance of the medical advice believed that he did not hear the
of the legally constituted medical interurban.
group of the state versus the less ! " Dr. Wagner was a very r
dependable opinion of the small:o nent alumnus of theiversit -
town doctor}" said Dean Hugh.
ton octor," aid Da n Hugh He was initiated into Tau Beta Pi,
Cabot, of' the medical school, in an ; ooayegneigfaenti
address before the University Press 1926rat the iver ty,
club yesterday, on the subject, "If h...*U er.,adls
I Were Conducting A Newspaper."' given the honorary degree of
Doctor of Engineering in 1927 by
The meeting, which was con- s the University. Last spring he
ducted in the form of a symposium spoke before the Alumni Triennial
and marked the last session of the 'meeting at Chicago.
three-day convention of Michigan -
editors in Ann Arbor, was also ad- He was born in 1864 in Ann
dressed by Prof. E. R. Sunderland, Arbor, where he was raised and
of the Law school, Prof. J. F. Shep- educated, graduating from the.
ard, of the department of psychol- I B. Sutton University in 1884 with an A. M.
ogy, and Rev. A. W. Stalker, of the President of Rotary Internation-. Mechanical Engineering in 1885.
Pirst M. E. church of Ann Arbor. al, who has recently returned to degree and received his B. S. in
Professor Sunderland speaking the United States from the sec- Following graduation he was en-
on the same subject as Dean ond Pacific Rotary conference in gineer for the Thomas-Houston
Cabot emphasized the importance Tokyo, Japan. Electric company of Lynn, Mass.,
of interesting the general public in returning to the University i 1890
the administration of justice Two Companies Send as associate professor. In 1896 he
through the columns of the news- j went to Rose Polytechnic institute,
d Geology Slides Here where he was raised to a profes-
papers." Prof. Shepard asked for ,
intellectual stimulation rather sor in 19104 and made president in
than emotional stimulation from Gifts of a number of slides to be 11923.
the newspaper. "The public needs used in various geology courses Dr. Wagner was professionally in
protection against quackery," he have come from the Union Pacific j the practice of: patent litigation,
said. "Hence the need for true railroad company and the Niagara beginning in 1893, and he was em-
scientific presentation in the news- Falls power company, it has been ployed by prominent patent attor-
paper." annunced., rm h neys of the country. He was a
E The slides from the Niagara fellow of the American Association
Reverend Stalker said that cmayaeo heflsadwl
though the press should not takescomany rustra thegalls and ill, for Advancement of Science and
'over the function of the pulpitsret lutat h elgclwas author of "Notes on Applied
there shouldbe mortin the plpt development of the falls. The ones Science" published in 1903.
there should be more in the papers from the railroad company are
about the simple ethical pfinciples colored and will very well help tq He is survived by his wife and
of social relations, "the great prin- correlate the work in a number of five children; a sister, Mrs. A. W.
ciples upon which humanity is courses Tanner of Ann Arbor; a brother,
built.' ______es.Charles Wagner, Barton Hills; and
'.^flluwing the meeting, the dele- The officers of the club were a nephew, Paul Wagner, an Ann
ates of the club were guests of unanimously reelected for the en- Arbor clothier.
icidiml H. Yost and the Board in suing year at a short business'
Controi of Athletics at the football meeting which preceded the sym- Subscribe for the Michiganensian
!ai posium. now. It costs only $4.00.

AVIATRIX TO TRY I
FOR FLIGHT MARK l

President-Elect Ship Is1 port holes and skylights were clos- for five minutes. He then went
ed and sealed. back to sleep at his quartezs in
Halted For Bad Gale When the wind and seas were at the stern of the battleship, whzich
their highest, Hoover was awaken- was swept deep, under water and
(By Associated Press) ed. He walked around his suite the prow lifted skyward.

U. S. S. MARYLAND, Nov. 24.-
The battleship Maryland, bearing
President-Elect Herbert Hoover
and his party on his tour of Latin-
American, today was riding a gale
which at one time attained a velo-
city of 70 miles an hour.
The battleship was brought to a
stop in the heavy seas while every-
thing was made safe.
Members of the Hoover party,
who had been driven to sleep on
the quarter deck by the excessive
heat, were forced to go below as
the Maryland entered the gulf of
Teauntepec on the southern Mexi-
can coast, where the heavy seas
were first encountered. All hatches,
TYPEWRITERS
RIBBONS
SUPPLIES
for all makes of
Typewriters.

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Seats on Sale Now
for
LAST TWO N. Y. THEATRE GUILD
PLAYS

"Ned McCobbs
Daughter"
A powerful drama of conflict
by Sidney Howard, author of
"The Silver Cord," and "They
Knew What They Wanted."
WEDNESDAY EVENING
NOVEMBER 28

"John Ferguson"
St. John Irvine's dramatic
masterpiece-The Guild's first
tremendous success.
MONDAY EVENING
DECEMBER 3

r
1
f
r

Mrs. Louise Thaion

Box Office-Whitney Theatre.

Uptown Office at

THE PRINT AND BOOK SHOP

I

Oakland, Cal., aviatrix, who in Rapid turnover, fresh stock, insures
laying plans for her attempt to best quality at a moderate price.
break the world's altitude record qua y
for women, had to prepare to 0. D. MORRILL
ascend: to more than 20,000 feet. 17 Nickels Arcade Phone 6615

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51,

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"The plays are in themselves amusing and absorbing.
These actors make them rare theatrical experiences."
-Prof. 0. J. Campbell.

Lafayette
at Shelby.

SHUBERT
LAFAYETTE
DETROIT

Cadillac
8705

Last Week-Beginning Sunday, Nov. 25th
THE ACTORS-MANAGERS, INCORPORATED
present
New York's Famous Musical Revue
"THE GRAND STREET,
with FOLLIES"
ALBERT CARROLL
Hilarious skits, clever songs and dances, side-splitting burlesques
of plays and players.
For six seasons an annual event on Broadway
Nights, 50e-$2.50; Thur. Mat., 50c-$1.50; Sat. Mat., 50c-$2.00

IIIIIII|f lll IlltllIIItfll IIl l~il lIi ii IIIIIIII|tilI1ii111I1fIf
i ASS=
a" C a
r -e-
THEATRE
Lafayette at Wayne Cadillac 1100
Beginning Sunday Evening, Nov. 25th
at 8:20 O'clock
PRICES: Evenings $1.00 to $2.50
{Thugs.) $aturday
MATINEES Thanksgiving Day 75c to $1.50
-rDa
Original New York Company Direct from
I ts-Garrick Theatre, Chicafo, Triu
"The SILENT HOUSE"
DON'T MISS
All the Thousand and One Blood-Bouncing=
THRILLS! LAUGHS! CHILLS
in This Greatest Shock-Drama of the Age
:1111 tlll ll ll1lt11N llltl1tltl 1Illlllllilltilsilli l l tlll ltlll lliulllllllltllil%||111111

: .wiM". /"1./~".I"./'./"./. 'i/FIS'/'. '/'i r ,~.IJ "/".I./,/S.Y././ /l./'Jl

mo- -***00 4C

*

If you go home
I imrk of the precious p
on Thanksgiving Day.

for Thanksgiving . .
)ictures of the folks you can take
Pictures that you won't part with
h...

years from now.

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I

Stop here for your Kodak before you go. We have all
models. Prices are whatever you wish to pay.
Calkins-Fletcher Drug Co.
Ann Arbor, Mich.

Three Dependable Stores.

We have served Michigan and her students for 40 years

.J°.r , .. ", Ir.I "/.I«J"'/ ~.r"./ I1.It"~' 4'/J1.d".~J« "..+ d J'1. '.r/.'..?d"1./" ".. ./.~Jd./":/". ". AS f~./". '. " ,. OY',/311./.1. ".~l~Jw':

Tomorrow the Michiga
you with a marvelous p
COMPLETE entertain
two solid hours you wil
;,the happier with a phot
turing the leading stars<
,>">:and a twin headline stag

W UTHE

...,...

an entices
program of
ment. For
1 be made
toplay fea-
of "Wings"
e program.

e:
..

THE HOME OF DISTINCTIVE PICTURES
presents
"THE AIR CIRCUS" ALL THIS WEEK
THE AMERICAN AVIATOR
AIRPLANES and AIRPORTS
The American Aviator, Inc.
21 WEST 60th STREET, NEW YORK, N. Y.
Telephones .:. Columbus .:. 9640 - 10143 - 10144
Wednesday, September 12th, 1928.
Mr. William Fox
West 55th Street
New York City, N. Y.
Dear Mr. Fox:
The writer, who was in the photographic
service during the recent World War and witnessed
the aerial activities at St. Mihiel, had the privilege,
last night, of seeing your new picture, "The Air
Circus."
Although last night was the anniversary of the
St. Mihiel drive, I am thankful it was not a war
picture. From a photographic standpoint, as well
as an aviation standpoint, the picture was a pro-
nounced success. I will not qualify my endorse-
ment of it in any way; it is clean, up-to-the-minute,
and technically correct, and we shall unstintingly
recommend it to our friends and readers.
Wishing you success in this, and the best
personal regards, I am, as ever,
Most cordially yours,
THE AMERICAN AVIATOR MAGAZINE,
By WALTER W. HUBBARD,
Vice-Pres. and Managing Editor.
WWH-dtw

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The drama of a youth who turns picturesque river bandit
for the honor of his family. And the beautiful heiress who
braves scandal and death in her great love for him. A
strong picture of the type that is in high favor with modern
audiences.
TWIN STAGE BILL

The Michigan Takes Particular Pride in Offering
The Tidal Wave of Songland

11

11

DE
Vaudevill
JA

RA N K
e's Distinctive Entertainer
MES STEIGER

Three Golfers
in
NOVELTY
ATHLETICS

In One
l~ore
Week
--Dec. 2.

F vrvn In~terested in Aviation(I-AfFC4S

.. 1'1"laV
t T4ARI.TF CNASSF

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PM

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