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February 22, 1929 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-02-22

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THE MICHIGAN DALLY

PRMA.Y,

FEBRUTARY 22, 1929

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 1929

SURVEY OF MICHIGAN MENIN SENATE; MADE BY fORMER POLITICAL
SCENCE INSTRUCTOR HERE, REVEALS MANY NOTED PERSONALITI[S

FiVE NATIVE SONS orship. It is significent that these.
fivesenator made' the step from
DISTINGUISHED either private life or local politics
to the second highest political of-
IN SENATE fice in the United States.,
The two senators representing
Many interesting facts concern- Michigan first got their Washing-
ing Michigan men in the Senate ton office by gubernatorial ap-
are brought out in an article re- pointment; Couzens to succeed.
ceived by the Daily which was Newberry in 1922, and Vandenburg
written by John J. George, instruc- to fill the vacancy created by thei
for in the political science depart- death of Woodbrige N. Ferris, (the;
ment last year and who is now only Democratic senator froml
professor of political science at Michigan in three quarters of a
Converse College, Spartanburg, S. century). Each was subsequently
C. George received his Ph.D. last elected to a full. term in his own
June and following that time ac- name. Hale, Howell and Cope-
cepted the professorship at the land went to the Senate by elec-
southern college. tion. Hale has served since 1917,
Wrote Several Articles Howell and Copeland since 1923,1
The article entitled "Wolverines Vandenburg a little less than a

flee he went to the Senate, prob-
ably explains that. Hale is the
most regular conservative of the
four Republicans. Howell and
Couzens reserve the right to a large
sphere of party independence.
While these two do not go the lim-
it of Norris and Blaine's liberalism,
neither Howell nor Couzens belong
to the group that "will stand with-
out hitching."
Two of her sons have gone east
and became senators-an unusual
thing. Only one has obeyed Gree-
ley's injunction "Go west, young
man." Hale, lawyer; Howell, engi-
neer; Vandenburg, editor; Cope-
land, physician and surgeon; Couz-
ens, banker, business man, and
capitalist.
BISHOP RECEIVES
CARNEGIE HONOR
Librarian W. W. Bishop of the
University, has been honored by
appointment as chairman of a re-
cently constituted advisory group
of college librarians, it was an-
nounced recently by Frederick P.
Keppel, president of the Carnegie
corporation of New York. R. M.
Lester, assistant to the president
of the Carnegie corporation, is
secretary.
This group was formed to advise
the Carnegie corporation as to
grants to college libraries. These
grants will probably -take the form
of books rather than money for
buildings or operation. The group,
has held two meetings.
New Type Fish Is

Get Committee Posts ej
Ordinarily assignments to Sen-
ate committees are made on al
basis of party regularity and sen-
~iority in service. Vandenburg, a
newcomer into the Senate, was at-
tached to the committee on the
District of Columbia, Terrirtories
and Insular Possessions, and-fit-
tingly-Printing. Copeland, be-
longing to the minority party has
no committee chairmanship; het
must be content with membership

Oil Company BoardI
Chairmanship Asked
In Stewart Letters
CHICAGO, Feb. 21.--Stockhold-
ers of the Standard Oil Co. of
Indiana, who March 7 will decide
whether Col. Robert W. Stewart is
to continue as chairman of the
board, have been mailed a new ap-
peal for re-election by Col. Stew-
art.
The letter charges spokesmen of1
John D. Rockefeller, Jr., with a
"campaign of misrepresentation"
in their effort to remove Col. Stew-
art fro mcontrol. It expresses the
hope that the contest between the
younger Rockefeller and himself
be kept on a high plane. "It was
my understanding that such, too,
was the hope and intention of Mr.
Rockefeller," the letter continued.
"Then Mr. Rockefeller sailed for
Egypt," Col. Stewart wrote in the
letters which went into the mails
Wednesday night. "Mr. Aldrich
(Winthrop W. Aldrich, brother-in-
la wand attorney for Mr. Rockefel-
ler) and Mr. Ivy Lee apparently
did not understand the matter as
he did.
"After saying he would embark
on no "unseemingly scramble for
proxies," it surely must be without
his knowledge or consent that
others in his name have embarked
upon a campaign of misrepresen-
tation; that they, in a very wild
scramble for proxies, indeed, have
brought the whole force of ilhe
Rockefeller millions to bear to in-
timidate and coerce wherever pos-
sible individuals and financial in-
stitutions and all of the companies
which the Rockefeller ' interests
dominate in order to defeat the
present management of this com-
pany."
His opponents, Col. Stewart said,
have initiated a "rule or ruin"
policy bent on obtaining control of
the company "regardless of th
consequences."
The chairman denied he was
asking a personal vindication of
the stockholders "that has already
been given to me by two courts
and two juries." What he wanted,
he said, was that they vote "for
the good of the company and your
own good."
FOREIGN-Danish women are a
serious lot, according to a report
from Copenhagen. One-third of
the undergraduate students of the
University of Denmark are spe-
cializing in philosophy. Six girls
are specializing in theology, even
though Danish women tnay not
hold church positions. The report
says 163 are going to be doctors,
59 lawyers, 22 political scientists,
and 97 are studying English.
Detroit Theaters
CASS THEATRE
LAST WEEK
Evenings-1.00 to $3.00;
Sat. Matinee-$1.00 to $2.50
Schwab & Mandel present
"GOOD NEWS"
SHUBERT
LAFAYETTE
Stratford-Upon-Avon Festival
Company
Friday Evening, Feb. 22
"Kcing Richard 11111

STUDY DISCLOSES
SCHOOL CHANGES
Consolidated rural schools have
been taking the place ofone-teach-
er schools at the rate of 1000 a
year during the last decade, it has
been disclosed through a recent
comprehensive survey made by the
Bureau of Education.
Arguments in favor of the spe-
cialized school point out that the
one room schools are usually taught
by the least trained and youngest
teachers, that the percentage of
attendance in one teacher schools
is far below that of grade schools
and that the social advantages of-
fered by larger schools give them
a superiority in training pupils
that can not be reached.

Try Our Meals
You will like our prices
Chicken Dinner Every Sunday
Mrs. Anna Kaimbach

..,,,

Changing.
Horses.

'.i. ~
, A 1 .
,_~
"'".'

LANE HALL TAVERN
The choicest of wholesome foods

a .
,t .
' ,

. *

.

on Appropriations, Commerce, DiscoveredHere
Education and Labor, and Immi- -
gration. Hale is chairman of Naval Dn
Affairs, and ranking member of Due to the observing eyes of lit-
Rules. Howell, chairman of Claims, tieFrancis Hubbs, daughter of Dr.
is a member of four other impor- Carl G. Hubbs, curator of fishes
tant committees, ranking member the University Museums, there
of Interstate Comnerce, and chair-yI has been found a new type of
man of Education and Labor, hybrid fish, a cross between a
CouzensĀ° at the opening of the ( pumpkin-seed and asunfish. While
Seentiethongesswn ina ohin the live fish experiment room
Setentieth Congress won in a con- 1the other day, the little girl chanc-
test for membership on the power- ed to observe a school of very small
ful Finance Committee. By virtue fishes swimming about one of the
of these committee posts, and his tanks;very excited, she hastened
serving on Pensions, and Civil to call her father who was delight-
Service, Couzens as a committee- ed to find that the cross that he
man easily outdistances the other had attempted between the two
f r lerinsDointespecies of fish was a success.
Mih genulic ns Dominate i The pumpkin-seed and the sun
Michigan senators are tradition- fish had been placed in the tanks
ally Republican. Two of the three several months ago. They reached
migrating Wolverines to become maturity exceedingly early, due to
senators have "kept the faith." the fact that they were cared for
Copeland alone refuses the Repub- in the laboratory better than in
lican label. The fact that he be- their natural streams. And it hap-
came Commissioner of Health of pened hat both species reached
New York in 1918 from which of- maturity at the same time.

A -
if ,

F1

T the portals of our large cities-Nei
York, Baltimore, Detroit, and soo
Cleveland-a semaphore halts a luxuriou
flyer drawn by a puffing steam engine.1
simple switching maneuver, and electricit
takes charge. A giant electric locomotive
quickly under way, glides silently into th
home stretch with its long string of Pullman
Like a thoroughbred it makes the run-tire
lessly. Passengers alight in a clean terming
-clean because there is no smoke or sou
Another milestone in transportation-al
other event in the life of the iron horse!
Civilization is progressing, with electricit
in the van. How fai this advance will tak
us, is a problem for our future leaders. I
is for them to develop and utilize nei

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ALL THIS WEEK
AT THE

it
w

U HERT
=THEATER =

applications of electricity--the force that is
pointing the way over uncharted courses,
not only in railroading, but in every phase
of progress.

found on large electric
locomotives and on
MAZDA lamps, electric
vacuum cleaners, and a
multitude of otherappli-
ances which serve us all.
It is 'the mark of an
organization that is
dedicated to the cause
of electrical progress.

>57

GENERAL ELECT
GENERAL ELECTRIC CLOMP AN Y SCH ENECTAD Y, N EW YOR

AND A TEAR BESIDES!

...........-... .
d

" '

LAST TIMES TODAY
Holiday Program Today with Orchestra
at Matinee Performances

NOW Boyle Wolfolk's G
SHOWING
Great Vaudeville Unit Show
MID-WINTER FROLIC
RADIO-KEITH
ORPHEUM ACTS
With
66OIA & VERDI LOOS BROTHERS
"IN MUSIC"
Glorified Classified "All in Harmony"
Mortified
D R,.THY STAN
SUMMERS KAVANAUGH
"The Versatility Girl" "The Juggling Humorist"

1

Sor by PJOA JOHNSON YOUNG '-: Scenriej byGUM thLDIOPA
JOHN FO R oducioa

APPOINTMENTS -
All in Technicolor
"Cleopatra"
Our Gang-
"GROWING PAINS"
News - Topics - Review

GRIFFIN TWINS
Pantone and Dancing

JIMMY LUCAS & CO.
"Vampire and Fool of 1929"

11

Cosmopolitan
Opening Saturday

EIGHT KURNICKER GIRLS

.. I

TL W'UEWMLW-

II

n- T T r Lr . T a.

i I

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